Reply to post: BT have bet all their chips on G.fast. It’s a big mistake. Why? Cybersecurity.

Customer: BT admitted it had 'mis-sold' me fibre broadband

Anonymous Coward
Anonymous Coward

BT have bet all their chips on G.fast. It’s a big mistake. Why? Cybersecurity.

BT have bet all their chips on G.fast. It’s a big mistake.

Just because other Countries are rolling out G.fast does not make it a legitimate reason to do so in the UK.

Outdated Firmware issues+rogue non-compliant devices, crosstalk aka “interference” (+low level industrial machinery “pump noise”), power issues are much bigger threats/issues than BT are letting on regards G.fast rollout and they are ignoring them, to save their own skin.

But the big one, equivalent to Apple’s Bendgate (why it shouldn’t be the basis for any UK national infrastructure rollout) and what BT and other promoters of G.fast are failing to mention regarding G.fast is how susceptible this technology is to malicious interference/blackmail. Its just far too easy to take out G.fast Circuits.

You have to ask why Ofcom has not even raised the issue to date of cybersecurity/robustness/safety of network for G.fast, regards outside malicious intent to disable it.

Inteference which could be applied for brief short bursts, causing real disruption and difficult to pinpoint such sources, (either accidental or deliberate). Knocking off 100’s circuits at once. This could be done with cheap technology, placed at strategic places in the network, timed to operate at the same time. It’s a real threat and oddly, BT aren’t mentioning it.

The security/reliability of banks of G.fast connections are very vunerable to blackmail in this way. Though not a known common threat at present, its certainly a reason to question BT’s thinking/approach in implementing G.fast Technology first and foremost for large scale UK rollout.

BT’s so called ‘cheap approach’ (it isn’t if you want ubiquitous coverage) using legacy copper hybrid G.fast approach just isn’t a robust, safe one, you have to look at the potential threats in the World today.

Personally, I think the malicious threat potential alone is enough to ditch this G.fast tech, going forward.

G.fast is going to end up an expensive mess, fault finding problems mean install costs are outweighed by maintenance/malicious interference costs, over the longer term. It’s going to end up a real complex, tangled mess.

Too many things are reliant on Broadband today. BT are being somewhat reckless “blinkered” in their approach building out the UK’s National Broadband infrastructure, where it can be easily attacked through malicious means.

Attacking the G.fast network doesn’t even take direct access to BT infrastructure and the technology to do this is cheap. It’s biased technical thinking in favour of BT’s legacy copper network.

It’s just not a sensible approach, its reckless.

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