Reply to post: These Empire comments...

Brexit? Cutting the old-school ties would do more for Brit tech world

smartypants

These Empire comments...

...in this article were a very bad decision. Many people like me who want us to remain in the EU are still concerned with the huge net inward migration imbalance and the impact it has on just about everything, and it's hard to be smug when people in their 20s are having to borrow £150 grand for a poxy one bedroom flat.

Free movement is great in principle when all the countries have a reasonably level playing field. The free movement of people, goods and services was captured for the first time as an agreement in the Treaty of Rome in 1957, signed by Belgium, France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and West Germany. You could argue that Italy was a bit borderline, but you could see how in principle free movement of people wasn't a big challenge to any of them, and it turned out not to be the case in practice. And you could argue that if you added just the UK to that list of nations today, the migration issue wouldn't exist.

But now the EU has profound differences in conditions, earnings and so on between certain member states, and Britain and a handful of other nations find themselves struggling with net inward migration whilst others suffer from a continual drain of talented people.

In principle, I can see how it might stabilise as prices rise in the countries who have joined more recently as they develop, but this process might take decades, and in the meantime the EU seems to be following the lead of the Eurovision song contest in not being able to say no to an ever wider definition of what Europe is.

So to make out that people with these concerns simply have some sort of love of an Empire seems very silly and pointless.

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