Reply to post: Re: how do you measure a change of 1/10,000 of a proton diameter with a laser?

Boffins' gravitational wave detection hat trick blows open astronomy

JeffyPoooh
Pint

Re: how do you measure a change of 1/10,000 of a proton diameter with a laser?

The paper itself is an easy read. Anyone with even a passing interest should review it.

The 'strain' (warp) is 10^-21. The signal is certainly in the noise. The paper explains how they did it.

I thought that the signal was on the order of the diameter of a proton (10^-18), not "1/10,000" that.

km-scale (10^3 m). 10^-21 strain (warp ratio). Proton (10^-18).

+3 scale, subtract 21 orders of magnitude = -18 scale

Proton.

Not 1/10,000.

Did I miss a memo?

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