back to article Are you getting it? Yes, armageddon it: Mass hysteria takes hold as the Windows 7 axe falls

The Windows 7 hysteria machine has most definitely kicked into gear today, with Viking burials and scary statistics for the orphaned operating system. Business continuity outfit Databarracks sent a Windows 7 box out to water aboard a slightly shonky-looking (and on fire) Viking longboat, sending the OS to Valhalla, before …

  1. chivo243 Silver badge
    Facepalm

    one would think

    plugging the holes in that decade-old code... A decade to fix the initial problems? How long to fix Win10??

    1. Version 1.0 Silver badge
      Facepalm

      Re: one would think

      If they have to give up support for Windows 7 then there's no hope for any other Microsoft OS, they don't know how to write operating systems any longer, all they have is programmers adding "features" so Windows 8 and Windows 10 will be dead in a ditch soon too. Dave Cutler's just got his feet on the desk, beer in hand, playing on his X-box.

      1. ForthIsNotDead
        Meh

        Re: one would think

        They're never going to write another operating system. They are going to slowly migrate over to Linux. Windows is not where their money is anymore. It takes a shit-ton of human resources to support it and fix it, on an on-going, never-ending basis. I have a friend that is a product evangelist at Redmond, and even he thinks Windows is on its way out.

        The boundary between Linux and Windows will slowly blur in the coming years, I believe.

        1. Arthur the cat Silver badge

          Re: one would think

          They are going to slowly migrate over to Linux.

          Oh joy, the Microsoft version of systemd.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: one would think

            Actually Windows always had a "services" system from which systemd attempted to copy. Just the Windows services were designed and built in form the beginning and work far better than Linux daemons.

          2. JohnFen Silver badge

            Re: one would think

            It's the other way around -- systemd is bringing the Microsoft Way into Linux.

            1. Version 1.0 Silver badge

              Re: one would think bringing the Microsoft Way into Linux.

              "But I did fdisk the little junker, and it did feel awfully good. And then I set about forcing Linux down its ungrateful Windows-compatible little throat." - Thomas C Greene, in El Reg about 20 years ago.

          3. Jonathon Desmond

            Re: one would think

            Oh joy, the Microsoft version of systemd.

            I thought systemd was the Microsoft version of systemd......

          4. Fungus Bob Silver badge

            Re: the Microsoft version of systemd

            systemBSOD?

            1. Kiwi Silver badge
              Linux

              Re: the Microsoft version of systemd

              systemBSOD?

              Well, you got the SOD part right...

          5. phuzz Silver badge
            Gimp

            Re: one would think

            And before anyone complains about the Windows Registry, have you used dconf/gconf?

            1. JohnFen Silver badge

              Re: one would think

              Dconf/gconf is a Gnome thing, not a Linux thing. I don't use Gnome so no, I haven't used those.

        2. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: one would think

          You're looking at it upside down. Actually what they are doing is making Linux applications run on Windows... which is not the outcome you all wish for....

          1. Teiwaz Silver badge

            Re: one would think

            You're looking at it upside down. Actually what they are doing is making Linux applications run on Windows... which is not the outcome you all wish for....

            Yup, transitioning over to Linux?

            Nonsense

            they still need something They can licence for a profit, transitioning over to Linux will mean users could migrate off of Azure or whatever future base and run it without paying Miscosoft.

            It might be something almost, but not quite, entirely unlike Linux.

            1. danbi

              Re: one would think

              They can always do what good old Apple did decades ago: ditch their homegrown OS and go mainstream with UNIX, while keeping what defines "Windows" (the APIs).

              Thus they can continue to license their "way" and software "for Windows" will continue to work.

              An no, note I didn't say Linux. :)

          2. ScrappyLaptop2

            Re: one would think

            They sure went through a lot of work making SQL Server run on Linux for nothing, then...

        3. rcxb Bronze badge

          Re: one would think

          They are going to slowly migrate over to Linux. Windows is not where their money is anymore.

          Windows on the desktop PC is still a money maker, but there's more on the enterprise/server side and more importantly that is the core component that allows them all their software lock-in.

          Last I saw, Windows on PCs earns them about $15bb/yr:

          https://cdn.geekwire.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/msftrev2017-630x472.png

          Not a market to shun, even if it's not their most profitable segment.

          Microsoft Office for Linux is an also-ran. SQL Server on Linux has tons of competition. XBox got popular because it offered game developers DirectX they were using on PCs. Their cloud service is popular because they can hand out cheap Windows server licenses. Without their proprietary/monopoly advantage from the OS, Microsoft's whole profit model breaks down.

        4. BobChip
          Linux

          Re: one would think

          The boundaries probably will blur, but having made the switch to Linux years ago I will stick with it. I will never go back to anything made by / associated with $MS. Think of it as a cultural preference. OH - and a fondness for stuff that actually works, as if functionality actually mattered when I am trying to do productive WORK.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: one would think

        "Playing on his X-box"

        I think that might be where Microsoft is focusing all their talent right now, gotta get that exclusive game content, pull those licensing fees in, and turn on the microtransaction tap...

      3. RunawayLoop

        Re: one would think

        I thought xbox was windows 10 (or the other way around)

      4. Archtech Silver badge

        Re: one would think

        " Dave Cutler's just got his feet on the desk, beer in hand, playing on his X-box".

        Didn't he retire back around 2000? I haven't seen much sign of his work since Gates crippled Windows NT by insisting it retain the "known and loved" Windows GUI.

        1. Version 1.0 Silver badge

          Re: one would think

          If you ever used RSX11M then you know what a good operating system looks like and how easy it is to patch and run even when your connection is a 1200 baud modem (yes, I had one of the expensive high speed modems when I worked with RSX11M).

    2. BGatez Bronze badge

      Re: one would think

      Win 10 IS the problem

    3. Alan Bourke

      Ah, Git ...

      What's wrong with Windows 10?

      1. Someone Else Silver badge
        Facepalm

        @ Alan Bourke -- Re: Ah, Git ...

        My dear Alan-

        What planet are you from, again?

      2. Dave K Silver badge

        Re: Ah, Git ...

        Nothing wrong with Windows 10 at all!

        Well, apart from the inherent instability and compatibility issues due to constant change, forced updates, inconvenient reboots, baked in telemetry, messy and inconsistent user interface, dreadful start menu, increasing demands to require a "Microsoft" account to use it, accessibility issues ("modern" apps ignore accessibility settings), potential to be cut off from updates when your laptop manufacturer declares your device "EOL".

        But apart from that, nothing wrong at all!

        1. katrinab Silver badge
          Flame

          Re: Ah, Git ...

          apart from that:

          Auto-installation of bloatware

          Two different control panels

          1. Dave K Silver badge

            Re: Ah, Git ...

            Honestly, I posted that and wondered how long it'd take for extra items to be added. And of course you're correct on both counts. You can add "advertisements" into it as well come to think of it...

          2. The Oncoming Scorn Silver badge
            Coat

            Re: Ah, Git ...

            ...apart from the sanitation, the medicine, education, wine, public order, irrigation, roads, a fresh water system, and public health, what have the Romans ever done for us?

            1. This post has been deleted by its author

            2. ashdav

              Re: Ah, Git ...

              what have the Romans ever done for us?

              They gave us Easter.

              1. Dagg

                Re: Ah, Git ...

                Nah, the christians stole it from the pagans.

                It's in the name "Easter" pre-Christian goddess in England, Eostre. Hence all the fertility references like eggs and rabbits.

                1. jelabarre59 Silver badge

                  Re: Ah, Git ...

                  Ah, I've wondered about the logic of rabbits carrying eggs, and what relation they had to the religious day.

              2. the Jim bloke Silver badge
                Pint

                Re: Ah, Git ...

                They gave us Easter.

                Ah, thank you,That made my day.

                Have a beer

            3. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              @The Oncoming Scorn - Re: Ah, Git ...

              Roman numerals ?

              1. Anonymous Coward
                Anonymous Coward

                Re: @The Oncoming Scorn - Ah, Git ...

                I prefer my English numerals, thank you.

                We didn't go full-brexit for nothing.

                1. alexmcm

                  Re: @The Oncoming Scorn - Ah, Git ...

                  You mean Arabic numerals.

                  Did you know 56% of American said they did not want arabic numerals taught in their schools:

                  https://www.independent.co.uk/news/arabic-numerals-survey-prejudice-bias-survey-research-civic-science-a8918256.html

                  Stick with imperial measurements and roman numerals. It is the future.

                  1. KBeee
                    Headmaster

                    Re: @The Oncoming Scorn - Ah, Git ...

                    Except what we call Arabic Numerals aren't Arabic at all. I think they are actually Hindu.

                    1. fandom

                      Re: @The Oncoming Scorn - Ah, Git ...

                      They are, they are called 'arabic' because Fibonacci, who introduced them in Europe, learned about them during his travels in north Africa.

            4. anonymous boring coward Silver badge

              Re: Ah, Git ...

              I don't recall a lot of innovation from MS, however?

          3. kmedcalf

            Re: Ah, Git ...

            "Auto-installation of bloatware" - never seen that, unless you mean the crap that comes pre-installed which you can remove (though some not so easily).

            "Two different control panels" - this is annoying, yes. I haven't figured out how to turn off the new ones and re-enable the old ones (which are still there).

            "Advertizing" - never seen that, maybe you should turn that off.

          4. RAMChYLD

            Re: Ah, Git ...

            How about forced obsolescence?

            NForce 980a motherboard. Installed windows 10 on it. Windows 10 proceeded to try to commit suicide by installing two different version of GeForce drivers side by side until the registry got corrupted and it can no longer boot. And if you're on Windows 10 Home, forget about turning off Windows Update for drivers, they made it so the only way to turn it off is to use GPO.

        2. kmedcalf

          Re: Ah, Git ...

          "inherent instability and compatibility issues due to constant change" - Don't rely on shit that depends on things that change. That means you should avoid all Microsoft tools and frameworks at all costs and stick to things that don't change -- like the Windows API. Properly designed an built software from the turn of the century works perfectly fine on all versions of Windows, and there are no compatibility issues. Using shit that relies on UWP, Microsoft Compilers, WPF, Windows Forms, dotSnot and other "change like underwear" technologies from Microsoft is the root of that problem. Avoid it by avoiding that shit like the plague.

          "forced updates" - can be turned off or otherwise controlled without too much difficulty

          "inconvenient reboots" - not a problem -- you have absolute control over this one

          "baked in telemetry" - can also be completely disabled with relative ease

          "inconsistent user interface, dreadful start menu" - can be fixed with third-party replacements

          "increasing demands to require a "Microsoft" account to use it" - not required at all unless you want to use the silly Microsoft store or other silly Microsoft crapware or cloudware

          "accessibility issues ("modern" apps ignore accessibility settings)" - don't know about this one because I disable all that crap including enabling the "disable useless animations" setting

          "potential to be cut off from updates when your laptop manufacturer declares your device "EOL"" - never experienced this. One of my laptops that stopped being manufactured and supported a decade ago still gets updates.

          1. Dave K Silver badge

            Re: Ah, Git ...

            "Don't rely on shit that depends on things that change." New versions of W10 have required new drivers - thus breaking devices that used to work. Same goes for certain AV products, bits of software etc. You're right about all the various frameworks, but guess what? These are all MS inflicted. They created this smorgasborg of different APIs and frameworks, and that combined with W10's rapid changes is leading to things breaking.

            "can be turned off or otherwise controlled without too much difficulty" - only options are to either disable the Windows Update service and change permissions to stop it auto-restating (which can be risky if you forget to re-enable it from time to time), or use 3rd party programs. Hardly an ideal solution.

            "not a problem -- you have absolute control over this one" - Look around online to find out how many times people have found their W10 machine has rebooted without their say so. MS likes to claim you have control, but W10 remains far too trigger-happy to reboot by itself than earlier Windows versions.

            "telemetry can be disabled" - With 3rd party apps, yes. Or loads of firewall rules. However I shouldn't have to rely on lots of firewall rules or 3rd party tools to ensure privacy from my OS.

            "interface/start menu" - Start menu can indeed be replaced with 3rd party tools, but I'm yet to see a 3rd party fix for the "two control panels" issue.

            "accessibility issues" - Indeed, and select "disable useless animations" and guess what? All the smooth scrolling and other animations are still there in UWP programs. And as much as I avoid UWP, the Start Menu and "Settings" are UWP.

            "EOL devices" - google around for "Clover Trail Atoms" - they can't use W10 beyond the Anniversary edition because they're EOL, need a new driver and Intel refuses to publish one. Same thing can easily happen for laptops and other devices if companies decide they want you to upgrade. No more drivers, wait for a W10 update that breaks something and hey-presto, you're SOL.

            In short what you are saying is that by installing a plethora of 3rd party utilities, creating lots of firewall rules and disabling various Windows services, W10 can be beaten into some sort of shape. You're right, but does this suddenly make W10 a good OS if so much dicking around is required?

            1. kmedcalf

              Re: Ah, Git ...

              It does not require much in the way of third-party tools. And there are Policy settings to control just about everything. And if you do not buy hardware that uses ill-conceived fly-by-night interfaces then you do not have to worry about driver support. That is, don't buy a "WinModem" if you want a "Modem".

              1. fandom

                Re: Ah, Git ...

                " And if you do not buy hardware that uses ill-conceived fly-by-night interfaces then you do not have to worry about driver support."

                I long for the time where it was only Linux fans saying that.

        3. anonymous boring coward Silver badge

          Re: Ah, Git ...

          "But apart from that, nothing wrong at all!"

          Not telling us WTF it's doing when it's, presumably, booting?

      3. Dave K Silver badge

        Re: Ah, Git ...

        Anyway, being serious for a moment - the issue is that Windows 10 is a very "marmite" OS. I do know people that really like it, however there are also a sizeable percentage of people that hate it.

        Thing is, there's a number of tweaks and changes MS could make (some admittedly are major, some quite small however) that would greatly increase Windows 10's perception amongst those who currently dislike it. The simple fact is that MS isn't interested. They honestly don't seem to care that there's a sizeable chunk of people that do not like Windows 10 and they don't seem to have any interest in tackling some of the common gripes about the OS to improve its perception. Why? Because given time, people won't have a choice any more. 3 more years and W10 will be the *only* supported OS that Microsoft provides. Plus of course they're more bothered about "the cloud" these days and subscription products like O365 and Azure, so W10 development is a low priority.

        And do I want to run an OS where the company behind it isn't really bothered, doesn't care about common gripes and would rather focus their efforts elsewhere? Not really, no.

        1. matjaggard

          Re: Ah, Git ...

          I don't mind marmite.

          1. Dagg

            Re: Ah, Git ...

            Rather have vegimite not so sweet...

            1. Andy Mac

              Re: Ah, Git ...

              Fools! Promite is the only way.

              1. thebightonion

                Re: Ah, Git ...

                It's Bovril for me you nancy-boys!

                1. druck Silver badge
                  Unhappy

                  Re: Ah, Git ...

                  Back when it was made with real beef extract.

                  It's just vegetable derived shit these days.

            2. Tim99 Silver badge
              Happy

              Re: Ah, Git ...

              Gentleman’s Relish, dear boy.

        2. danbi

          Re: Ah, Git ...

          For any OS to be "good" it has to get out of the way. The less the OS puts itself in front of you, the better it is.

          Users of computers buy them not to run any "OS", but to run their applications. It is amazing Microsoft did not learn this for so many decades.

      4. martinusher Silver badge

        Re: Ah, Git ...

        >What's wrong with Windows 10?

        Ahhh! Clickbait!!!!

        There's absolutely nothing wrong with Windows 10, if you're into that sort of thing. Its a bit like switching from a computer to a phone, though -- its full 'o bloatware, its constantly being 'upgraded', the UI isn't really designed for desktop use. It's noticeably slower than Win7 running on the same hardware.

        The problem with this kind of question is that if you don't know the answer already then the answer isn't going to satisfy you. If you're happy with Win10, great. The rest of us put up with it because we're forced to and run something else when we can.

    4. Roland6 Silver badge

      Re: one would think

      >plugging the holes in that decade-old code... A decade to fix the initial problems? How long to fix Win10??

      Well given W10 is just the further development of the W7 code-base which in its turn was just a development of the Windows code-base stretching back to the 1990's, I suggest never; they will simply draw a line and rebrand it as something shiny-and-new.

      1. ashdav

        Re: one would think

        Windux/Lindows ?

        Place your bets now.

        1. It's just me
          Linux

          Re: one would think

          Microsoft already owns the Lindows trademark.

          In 2001 the founder of mp3.com released a Linux distribution names Lindows OS.

          Microsoft sued them in 2002 and in a 2004 settlement MS gave them $20 Million, they transferred the Lindows trademark to Microsoft, and changed their name to Linspire.

          https://www.operating-system.org/betriebssystem/_english/screen_gallery.php?bsgfx=linux/lindows/shot0-scr-.jpg

          1. JohnFen Silver badge

            Re: one would think

            > a 2004 settlement MS gave them $20 Million, they transferred the Lindows trademark to Microsoft, and changed their name to Linspire.

            According to the US Patent Office trademark search engine, Lindows and Linspire are dead marks.

            1. Carpet Deal 'em Bronze badge
              Holmes

              Re: one would think

              Linspire is still a going concern, however(and is even running a Windows 7 EOL special right now); registration confers more benefits, but simple active use is enough to offer basic trademark protection. "Lindows" would be more properly dead, but that Microsoft sued over it once and effectively won is more than enough to keep other people from using it.

  2. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Panic? What Panic?

    Industry and Govs have another few Years but the Public need not fear as long as they keep their firewalls and AV updated.

    Problem is too many don't have either.

    I'll be running7 for another decade until I can get a cut down version of WIN10ware without most of their "helpful" features.

    Already have a few boxes with it just sitting there next the the Ubuntu box but see no need to use them unless I have to support a CLient.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Panic? What Panic?

      If there are any security problems with Windows 7 then I might go back to XP - I don't think that anyone is writing hacks or viruses that run on 16-bit operating systems any more.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Panic? What Panic?

        Even if nobody is making new viruses for XP (I bet someone somewhere is), that doesn't mean that there isn't numerous amounts of viruses previously created, which were never patched still lurking about.

        With that said, choose wisely which websites you visit, where you download your software and p from, and you should be fine*!

        * For the love of tux, don't forget your AV / Firewall and any other defence you may need.

      2. LDS Silver badge

        Re: Panic? What Panic?

        To go back to 16 bit you need to run Windows 3.1. Even using only 16 bit applications on a 32 bit system still lets the OS itself exposed to 32 bit malware. Albeit I don't think much malware written today could run in Windows 9x.

        1. C. Patrick

          Re: Panic? What Panic?

          Problem is, everything before XP/2000 had all the characteristics of experimental technology. As in, it only kind of worked.

          1. DuncanLarge Silver badge

            Re: Panic? What Panic?

            Like windows 10 today, hmm consistency. Well done Microsoft.

      3. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Panic? What Panic?

        If you need to use file sharing with Windows XP, you only have SMB1 which is full of holes.

        You might be able to firewall your Windows XP machine to protect it from incoming nasties, but allowing SMB1 on any device to serve files will likely cause you grief at some point.

        And if you choose to browse the Internet, it looks like Firefox is the most up-to-date option with support ending in 2018 assuming all the script blockers still work with that version.

        1. localgeek

          Re: Panic? What Panic?

          I have found one browser that still supports XP, and that's MyPal. It's based on Palemoon. I was poking around on my old Asus EeePC earlier today, and there was a new version posted in just the past few months.

          Also, ClamWin still works with XP.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Asus EeePC

            "poking around on my old Asus EeePC earlier today"

            Those were the days, were they not?

            https://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/10/02/eee_girl_saga_continues/

          2. DuncanLarge Silver badge

            Re: Panic? What Panic?

            NetSurf also

        2. Ken Moorhouse Silver badge

          Re: SMB1

          The elephant in the room is the fact that many W10 installations will need to start off by turning on support for SMB1 to assist step-by-step migration. So when all the legacy boxes have gone, who is going to remember to switch off SMB1 support? Many of us are from the if it ain't broke don't fix it school, reinforced by the bean-counter who doesn't want to shell out for changes such as this, so it is likely that many W10 boxes will be vulnerable for years to come.

        3. herman Silver badge

          Re: Panic? What Panic?

          SMB1 only? Nah, Windows XP has FTP support also!

        4. Roland6 Silver badge

          Re: Panic? What Panic?

          >If you need to use file sharing with Windows XP, you only have SMB1

          Out-of-the-box/vanilla XP granted, but there are still many third-party NFS clients around in addition to Windows Services for UNIX.

          >it looks like Firefox is the most up-to-date option with support ending in 2018 assuming all the script blockers still work with that version.

          There shouldn't be a problem with the relevant data files themselves, the issues will be firstly getting XP to connect to the relevant sources to auto-update the files, the second is for the blocker add-on to intelligently stop doing software updates when the next update is incompatible with XP...

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      "as long as they keep their firewalls and AV updated."

      Yeah, because we all know firewalls in consumer routers are invulnerable, people don't open ports blindly to play games or run "file exchange applications", and laptops are never connected to public networks...

    3. Carpet Deal 'em Bronze badge

      Re: Panic? What Panic?

      I'll be running7 for another decade until I can get a cut down version of WIN10ware without most of their "helpful" features.
      Well, there is technically the LTSC version, which lacks "basic" features like Cortana and the Microsoft Store(which means you'll need to provide your own calculator and sticky notes program). The license is only available for enterprise, but it's still available to take for a joyride.

  3. Michael H.F. Wilkinson Silver badge
    Coat

    Time to grab the book ...

    and read the large friendly letters on the cover

    Best advice ever

    I'd better be going. The one with the HHGTTG cassettes in the pocket, please. Doffs hat (large, leather Nebraska, it is rainy and windy today) to the late, great Douglas Adams

    1. OssianScotland Silver badge
      Pint

      Re: Time to grab the book ...

      Unfortunately I can upvote you only once.

    2. thondwe

      Re: Time to grab the book ...

      Upvoted for the usual reference, though have doubts as to whether "Nebraska" is actually a style of hat!

      1. Michael H.F. Wilkinson Silver badge

        Re: Time to grab the book ...

        Nebraska was the brand name now faded away on the label. Think large cow-leather cowboy style hat. The rim of my Aussie thin roo-leather Barmah flaps around too much in the current wind

        1. Antron Argaiv Silver badge

          Re: Time to grab the book ...

          You want a good, stiff...waxed cotton. Mine, I think, is a Outback Trading Kodiak (a pretty good knockoff of Driza-Bone) and it's pretty darn solid. Got it for cheap off Goodwill and applied some more proofing to it, seems good as new (and it's quite old)

          1. Sir Runcible Spoon Silver badge

            Re: Time to grab the book ...

            You can't go wrong with a Tilley hat, lifetime guarantee and all that. Mines still going strong after 20 years.

        2. thondwe

          Re: Time to grab the book ...

          My Barmah is also risky in high winds - usually resort to baseball cap then - not so stylish though

        3. W.S.Gosset Silver badge
          Thumb Up

          Re: Time to grab the book ...

          Speaking as an Aussie: hear hear. Roo leather for brims is silly.

          Best such hat I've ever had, by a long way, is actually from Argentina. Stays on+stable in UK coastal winds, keeps you dry when it rains, keeps you warm when it's cold, keeps the sun off when it appears, soaks up bad treatment without losing its looks or shape.

          Estribos. Argentinian mob. Available in UK now online or rock up to one of the free polo days at Goodwood and try-before-you-buy like I did. Argentinian hide which is still the same old quality that Aussie hide used to be (no longer :( ) But normal high-street prices. Mine's 12 years old and still looks great :

          LINK "Fer" there is not a typo -- for some reason that's what they call that style of hat, like Fedora or Trilby. *shrug*

    3. lybad

      Re: Time to grab the book ...

      And only 42 years since first broadcast, given a month or so.

      1. OssianScotland Silver badge
        Linux

        Re: Time to grab the book ...

        42 (appropriately) years? It seems only yesterday I listened to it live on Radio 4. I'm officially OLD!

        icon - and, like Ford, am rapidly turning into a penguin

        1. Sir Runcible Spoon Silver badge

          Re: Time to grab the book ...

          Start to worry when the buildings begin to ebb and flow.

      2. ashdav

        Re: Time to grab the book ...

        "42" years.

        Where's my towel ?

        1. Sir Runcible Spoon Silver badge

          Re: Time to grab the book ...

          I lost my towel*, and thus all credibility in this lifetime.

          *It was an actual HHGTG towel as well, with 'Don't Panic' written on it in large, friendly, letters.

          I bet some bastard stole it.

          1. W.S.Gosset Silver badge

            Re: Time to grab the book ...

            If he stole it, he must be viewed as not hoopy but froodulent.

          2. DuncanLarge Silver badge

            Re: Time to grab the book ...

            > I bet some bastard stole it.

            Oh BELGIUM!

    4. kmedcalf

      Re: Time to grab the book ...

      Its -40 degrees here today. That is the same number whether you are using Centigrade or Fahrenheit.

      1. Sir Runcible Spoon Silver badge
        Coat

        Re: Time to grab the book ...

        ..but not Kelvin.

    5. NoKangaroosInAustria
      Coat

      Re: Time to grab the book ...

      Argh! i liked your comment and now you have 43 upvotes. A millisecond before my finger completed its vertically descending journey against the mouse button, i thought "Haha, 42 upvotes? what are the odds of that?" and now i found out, likes can't be undone.

      My profound apologies.

      This makes me feel depressed. So depressed, that i'll be leaving now.

      Mine is the one with the keys to the Infinite Improbability Drive in the pocket.

      1. Kiwi Silver badge

        Re: Time to grab the book ...

        and now i found out, likes can't be undone.

        Votes cannot fully be undone, but you can reverse them (ie if you up and didn't want to you can down). I'd love to see a remove/cancel option as well.

  4. JakeMS
    Mushroom

    Thanks Reg!

    Now I have that Def Leppard song stuck in my head....

    1. Killing Time

      Re: Thanks Reg!

      Got a nod in to the album as well...

    2. Zarno

      Re: Thanks Reg!

      It's a good earworm on a Tuesday.

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    I run Oracle VM on W7 - to use Linux Mint for browsers. The VM is a fresh clone each day just in case a browser session picks up something. Not a foolproof strategy - but it is defence in depth.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      The problem is you W7 host is directly connected to a network - if there is a remote exploitable vulnerability (i.e. remote desktop, if enabled, or any other service) and there's a way to reach your host, you're at risk anyway. Even the hypervisor itself could become a risk, if it spots a vulnerability in its network stack or something alike. You'll need to mitigate anyway the network attack surface.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        "You'll need to mitigate anyway the network attack surface."

        The house router does not permit inward connections - and is as good a firewall against speculative port attacks as can be expected. The W7 has an AV protection.

        As I said - it is not foolproof but it is defence in depth. My online bank account is protected by manual 2FA using an independent device that is not a phone nor network connected.

    2. ovation1357

      Would be a whole tonne more secure if it were a Linux desktop with Windows held captive inside a VM.

      It's not just Web browsers, if you're using MS Office or a whole raft of other software - it's going to be making http(s) calls out to all sorts of web services in the background. You might be lucky but you might not.

  6. Rich 2 Silver badge

    We’re doomed I tell you

    I heard this headline on the news yesterday and was rather puzzled by the hysterical way it was reported - email will cause untold damage - viruses will attack - just playing an mp3 will trigger the end of times (OK I made that one up) - arrrrggggggggggg.....

    My first thought was “this is Windows - what’s different?” Very odd

  7. Andy Non Silver badge

    Asteroids

    "the wailing over the perceived Windows 7 asteroid hurtling toward the huddled masses."

    It makes a change for The Express not to have a clickbait panic headline about an actual asteroid on course for the Earth today.

    I wonder if you can play that old arcade game "Asteroids" on Windows 7?

    1. DJV Silver badge

      Re: I wonder if you can play that old arcade game "Asteroids" on Windows 7?

      Try here: http://pjsfreeware.synthasite.com/downloads-1.php

    2. NorthIowan
      Mushroom

      Re: Asteroids

      According to www.spaceweather.com the nearest known asteroid today is 2020 AO. At about 49 meters it is no world killer but more than big enough you wouldn't want it hitting too near where you are. But it went by at 9.3 LD (Lunar Distances = 384,000 km or 239,000 miles) so it wasn't even close on this pass.

      1. NetBlackOps

        Re: Asteroids

        Next five rocks are going by at that distance, too. I checked ☺.

  8. LDS Silver badge
    Devil

    What about the mysterious bug in Windows cryptolibraries Krebs talked about today?

    But I guess we'll know in a few hours. Handy, it came just when Windows 7/2008 are being no longer supported for free.

    Is MS going to release a final patch or not?

    1. Thoguht Silver badge

      Re: What about the mysterious bug in Windows cryptolibraries Krebs talked about today?

      That's just like when my previous car went out of warranty and suddenly the garage found all these things that needed fixing.

      1. Chairman of the Bored Silver badge

        Re: What about the mysterious bug in Windows cryptolibraries Krebs talked about today?

        Your garage problem has a solution:

        In my town there are two principal garages. I will take the vehicle to one and say, "Please do the state inspection... But remember that Billy Bob down the street will get the repair work. I'm here for inspection only". Swap vendors as needed. Rinse, repeat.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: What about the mysterious bug in Windows cryptolibraries Krebs talked about today?

          Could be worse... I had one garage get my car through the MOT, passed with flying colours. Next day, went to start it up... BANG. IMO they redlined it far to much trying to do the emissions (only after it went back I though back to hearing too much noise coming from the test area). No way to prove it/anything though sadly. So was down a car. I'd had it all of 7 days too!

          1. Chairman of the Bored Silver badge

            Re: What about the mysterious bug in Windows cryptolibraries Krebs talked about today?

            I wonder why the heck the garage was redlining your vehicle. If your car is new enough for OBD-II fitment I'd expect the emissions check to primarily consist of reading any emissions fault codes from your ECU.

            I think there is a MOT test that checks whether your exhaust system is louder than a typical vehicle if the same type. Im not sure how redlining is an appropriate test for that...

            El Reg needs a 'screwed' icon

        2. thebightonion

          Re: What about the mysterious bug in Windows cryptolibraries Krebs talked about today?

          So when they realise you are screwing both of them aren't you going to face longer and longer journeys and piss in your tank?

          1. Chairman of the Bored Silver badge

            Re: What about the mysterious bug in Windows cryptolibraries Krebs talked about today?

            Piss in the tank? Could be! But as long as they hate each other more than me, I should be good.

  9. Anonymous Custard Silver badge
    Trollface

    This message will self destruct in 5 seconds...

    However, your old Windows 7 PC isn't going to immediately self-destruct...

    Nah, you need to wait until it's updated to Win10 for that...

  10. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    I wish old Bill (or whoever calls the shots) would just open source the Win7 code and put it on GitHub. We could finally see how bad it is (or not) and how many bullets we dodged. And we could fix / expand the OS. From what I can tell MS is not making a lot of money from OS sales anymore and the enterprise customers would remain with 10 for sure, instead of putting their IT fate into the hands of the open source community (which they cannot sue...). So I don't really see any downsides.

    1. imanidiot Silver badge

      Too much of it still in Win10 probably. I doubt core MS code is ever going to get open-sourced to that level.

      1. Roland6 Silver badge

        > I doubt core MS code is ever going to get open-sourced to that level.

        HP could kick things off and put VMS on GitHub...

    2. kmedcalf

      They can't sue Microsoft either. Don't you read your license agreements?

    3. Strahd Ivarius
      Trollface

      The NSA would not be pleased...

  11. anthonyhegedus Silver badge

    Half of our few remaining customer on Win7 are saying 'oh my god how did this suddenly happen, we'd better do something about it, I'm worried about being hacked so much that I might explode!' and the other half are saying 'I don't want to change because... change' and then whine on about windows 10 being SO different from Windows 7 that they couldn't possibly cope, and that the really important architectural drawings they've got in a 20-year-old piece of software that just about runs in Windows 7 absolutely need to be accessible despite only being told about the software no longer having support in 2005.

    1. ThatOne Silver badge

      > despite only being told about the software no longer having support in 2005

      So what? If it still does its job 15 years later, what reason would one have to not keep using it for another 15 years?

      Ah sorry, I forgot, "new & shiny"... "Upgrade yearly for that intoxicating scent of freshness (we slightly changed the background color and shuffled the menus around a bit). Your productivity will soar, your skin will feel like silk, and amazing people will want to be friends with you".

      1. anthonyhegedus Silver badge

        It’s not the ‘new and shiny’ aspect that’s important, it’s the fact that an unsupported piece of software will break, either because it’s faulty, or more likely because something in the environment changes. This is usually Windows itself. A Windows update can break an old piece of software. And why do you need Windows updates? Because the threat landscape is continually changing. New attacks, new vulns found etc. Basically if you’re connected to the internet, you need to keep up to date. It’s not for the pure fun of it.

        1. NetBlackOps
          Alert

          Ummm..., what Windows updates? Win 7. unless you fork over the Big Bucks ain't gonna see updates although methinks the crypt32.dll vuln announced today might change that calculation. Then again, it's Microsoft, so who knows?

          1. Kiwi Silver badge

            ain't gonna see updates although methinks the crypt32.dll vuln announced today might change that calculation.

            There is precedent. MS did release a patch for XP long past it's EOS date. That said, XP probably still had 50% of the market at that point while H8 was still struggling to get past 0.0005% :)

            1. Carpet Deal 'em Bronze badge
              Boffin

              While the desktop and server versions were indeed axed long ago, there were still editions in support until just recently(while officially different, the daring could still get the patches applied against the desktop edition).

        2. kmedcalf

          Luckily that problem is solved because Microsoft will no longer be fiddling with Windows 7 code. Windows 7 has entered the era of stability. As it works today so shall it work tomorrow, for all values of tomorrow (barring applying any Microsoft updates, of course).

        3. ThatOne Silver badge

          > either because it’s faulty, or more likely because something in the environment changes

          Well, if hasn't broken down in the previous 15 years, chances are it isn't faulty and unwarranted change is the only danger. That's why the OS has to stay the same, given there is no real reason for it to change. The whole "patches" thing is only relevant if you put your computer at risk to be infected/hacked.

          Imagine, I still use a computer running Win98! It has Office95 on it, and is placed in a comfortable niche I like to sit when typing long texts. It is obviously not connected to Internet (although I wonder what the modern web would look like in Netscape Navigator...), and documents are only outgoing, never incoming, so I don't care about the lack of compatibility with the newest standards. It has been working for decades, It has successfully been used to write about 5000 pages and a thesis, so why would I throw it away? Just because it's old? I'm old too.

          1. TheMeerkat

            Modern Internet won’t work with Netscape Navigator as older version of SSL would not be supported by websites and the browser won’t support new versions of TLS.

            1. ThatOne Silver badge
              Happy

              > won’t work

              Thanks, although it was more of a rhetorical question. Even beyond the fundamental issue of SSL, I'm pretty sure Navigator would choke on the over-reliance on scripts, styles and all the fuss apparently needed today to display a page of formatted text with some pictures.

        4. kmedcalf

          While your drivel is nice, it is in error.

          If it is "unsupported" (as in no longer getting a monthly molestation from Microsoft) then there can be no "updates" to break it. So having no more molestation by Microsoft is a good thing.

          New vulnerabilities are not found, because their are none (and cannot be any). Old vulnerabilities are found. In order for there to be a new vulnerability you have to update the software. If it is no longer being updated, there can be no new vulnerabilities.

          This is called "entering the age of stability", for as it worked yesterday, so it will work tomorrow, for all values of today moving forward.

          1. fandom

            It will work, yes, but next month Microsoft will fix a vulnerabity in Win10 and exploiters will check if it also exists in Win7.

            If it does, they will exploit it and, indeed, the exploit "will work tomorrow, for all values of today moving forward."

      2. fidodogbreath Silver badge

        So what? If it still does its job 15 years later, what reason would one have to not keep using it for another 15 years?

        Ah sorry, I forgot, "new & shiny".

        Proprietary and undocumented binary file format, more likely.

    2. Clive Arnold

      It's not that Windows 10 is so different it's because its so ****ing awful and a constant battle to use. I have 10 for VR gaming and the rest of the time I use Windows 7 and always will (with the usual safety procedures in place)

      7 is vastly superior to 10, hell I'd rather use Vista than 10, both have the added bonus of not having Cortana snooping in the background

      1. kmedcalf

        Cortana can be completely turned off.

        1. Roland6 Silver badge

          >Cortana can be completely turned off.

          But not uninstalled, never to reappear. So the code is still there linked into the live system; all ready and waiting for some rogue executable to access it...

  12. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Microsoft Win10 Specs

    According to Microsoft talking to the BBC, Windows requires.....

    "In order to run Windows 10, PCs must have a 1GHz processor, 16GB of hard drive space, and 1GB of RAM memory."

    So they do have a sense of humour?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

      In addition, and I can't believe I missed this. "......RAM Memory"

      Random Access Memory Memory. I need a facepalm smiley.

      1. Someone Else Silver badge
        Facepalm

        Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

        You mean this one? ----------->

        1. David 132 Silver badge

          Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

          He posted as AC. ACs don’t get to choose their icon.

          1. Sir Runcible Spoon Silver badge

            Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

            Someone used to be able to do it, but I haven't seen a recent example.

            1. Kiwi Silver badge
              Boffin

              Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

              Someone used to be able to do it, but I haven't seen a recent example.

              I believe I've seen that person this year, but it'd take a ton of hunting through the Reg topics I've read to find.

              Some time back (2+ years I believe) someone actually posted how to do custom icons (including some of the missing ones) but I've not been able to find that page on El Reg either. If I get really bored over the weekend and feel like hunting for it I will (and the tabs on my weekend computer might already have it anyway)

            2. Roland6 Silver badge

              Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

              >Someone used to be able to do it, but I haven't seen a recent example.

              I suspect that was because El Reg didn't make "Anonymous Coward" and variants such as "Anonymous Coward " reserved Forum user names...

        2. Maty

          Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

          RAM memory? Add it to the list that already includes PIN numbers and ATM machines.

          1. OssianScotland Silver badge

            Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

            PAT Tests?

      2. Roj Blake Silver badge

        Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

        Sounds like someone has PNS* Syndrome.

        * PIN Number Syndrome

      3. Sudosu

        Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

        Yeah I have a pile of RAM Memory on my shelf right next to the stack of CD discs.

        1. Kiwi Silver badge
          Paris Hilton

          Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

          Yeah I have a pile of RAM Memory on my shelf right next to the stack of CD discs.

          I don't have any CD discs myself, but I do have several digital video DVD discs..

          1. DuncanLarge Silver badge

            Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

            I have a whole stack of HDD drives to be tested in the PC computer I built for the job. My other computer isnt a PC computer but an Acorn one which has 12 MB or RAM memory and 1MB of video memory and a HDD drive which spins loudly. It run on the RISC OS operating system and looks great on an LCD display. I have a gool ol' CRT tube monitor that I cold use but the LCD display is lighter to move about.

            Hopefully I will be able to put a CD writer in it because burning CD-R recordable discs would make a good way of transferring data without having to faff about trying to get enternet working.

            Many of my other electronics use not LCD displayes but VFD displays.

            At work I'm currently moving data to a SAAS service which is pretty boring hence why I'm here.

    2. Someone Else Silver badge
      Linux

      Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

      According to Microsoft talking to the BBC, Windows requires.....

      "In order to run Windows 10, PCs must have a 1GHz processor, 16GB of hard drive space, and 1GB of RAM memory."

      Hmmm. So that means my old Sempron 3400+ box, with 2 30GB spinning-rust platters, and 2GB RAM (expandable to a whopping 3GB) will run Win10? You mean that box I just installed Linux Mint 19.3 on?

      Who knew?!?

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

      There's still a 32 bit version, if you want to try it. The flat UI should be less CPU demanding too.... <G>. What you can do with it I don't know, but the OS should run.

      1. Kiwi Silver badge
        Trollface

        Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

        What you can do with it I don't know, but the OS should run.

        I had the runs the other day after some reheated KFC. It wasn't pleasant.

        Probably more enjoyable than 10 though, and certainly in the same nature...

      2. Roland6 Silver badge

        Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

        >There's still a 32 bit version, if you want to try it. The flat UI should be less CPU demanding too....

        Needs to be, as recent generations of Intel CPU's don't support Win10 32 bit drivers. [ Intel's easy to read table and Microsofts fuller viewpoint, which includes Win10 builds, AMD etc.].

    4. katrinab Silver badge
      Facepalm

      Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

      BRB - just installing Windows 10 on my first generation AMD Athlon machine that is sitting in my collection of ancient computer bits.

      1. DJV Silver badge

        Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

        Does W10 come on 5.25 floppies? Might try installing* it on my Commodore Pet if so.

        * Sorry, I meant "downgrading" my Commodore Pet...

      2. IceC0ld Silver badge

        Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

        BRB - for a very unspecific amount of time before you return though

    5. Bob Camp

      Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

      I'm running it on a Compaq Presario, two 2 GHz cores, 4 GB RAM, and 30 GB partition and it runs great. This PC has a Windows Vista sticker on it.

      Way better than Linux, which for some reason locks up on boot, suspend, resume, or just randomly whenever it wants. I think it's the Nvidia graphics, but the open source drivers cause massive flickering and Nvidia's proprietary drivers just aren't working. I've tried a few flavors of Ubuntu, Mint, Zorin, Manjaro ... all have the same problem.

      If your PC was running Windows 7, it'll run Windows 10. One trick I haven't seen anywhere else is to disable all the background apps you don't use or don't need to run in the background. That really speeds things up.

      1. Robert Sneddon

        Last-gen fondleslabs

        I've got a couple of older Windows tablets each a dual-core Atom CPU running at 1.4 GHz and 1GB or 2GB of RAM with, I think, 32GB of eMMC storage, both running patched and up-to-date Win10. They're not blindingly fast but they run.

      2. NetBlackOps

        Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

        Likely, you need to find an older binary-blob nVidia driver for it. That's what I've had to do before.

      3. kmedcalf

        Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

        Disabling unneeded and unused services and scheduled tasks is standard minimum security procedure. How is it a "trick"?

        1. Kiwi Silver badge
          Trollface

          Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

          Disabling unneeded and unused services and scheduled tasks is standard minimum security procedure. How is it a "trick"?

          Given how many of them there are to knock out, I'm not sure the word "minimum" is appropriate....

      4. PaulFrederick

        Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

        I've run Nvidia's binary driver since the day they released it as beta software. The first few months it was pretty unstable. Has not caused me any problems since then with newer versions though. Right now on this PC I have 102 days of uptime and I am running proprietary Nvidia binary driver on it too. I cannot ask for any more stability than I already have really. I guess what they say about Linux being choosy about who it's friends with is true? I've always gotten along with it myself though.

    6. quartzz

      Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

      the BBC doesn't need a sense of humour

    7. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

      When I looked at 2 Windows 10 installations I have on my desk, (granted neither are fresh) the Windows folder alone was 28.3GB and 41.2GB. That is just the Windows folder. Now add to that...

      User data

      Hyberfil.sys

      Swap file

      System Restore

      Program Files

      16GB of HDD space seems like a pipe dream.

    8. Alumoi

      Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

      They said run, and indeed, it runs on those specs. They said nothing about being able to use it. And the 16GB hard drive refers to free space after installation.

    9. Martin
      WTF?

      Re: Microsoft Win10 Specs

      ""In order to run Windows 10, PCs must have a 1GHz processor, 16GB of hard drive space, and 1GB of RAM memory.""

      Bollocks. I have a 32G hard disk on my machine and it RUNS Windows 10. It's complaining that I need to update it to the latest version. But if I try to upgrade it to the latest version, it fails for lack of disk space.

      I don't believe 16G is anywhere near enough.

  13. Sleep deprived

    "plugging the holes in that decade-old code"

    It'll take forever actually: Windows Updates is repeatedly failing at installing KB4516065 from last September on my W7 Thinkpad...

    1. ThatOne Silver badge

      Re: "plugging the holes in that decade-old code"

      I solved a similar problem by renaming the c:\Windows\Software Distribution folder to something else (requires temporarily stopping Windows Update Services ("net stop wuauserv")), and let Windows rebuild it (happens automatically when you re-enable Windows Update Services ("net start wuauserv")).

      Note that once the new one was working I deleted the old one, it's several GB in size after all. All this needs to be done as root (administrator) of course.

      After that, Windows Update managed to install patches it was choking upon before.

      Another way to force install is to download the patch as an .msu executable (search by the KB number) and attempt a local install. It works some times. Also rebooting helps. Each time you tempt something, and even if it apparently didn't work, reboot.

      My, since I've got used to the Linux updater I can't believe how clumsy, buggy and slow the Windows one is (and that was on a clean, freshly installed Win7, nothing on it, never used). Sorry Microsofties, Microsoft themselves admit their update service is "quirky" if not partially broken, and tries to offer workarounds to that...

      1. Sir Runcible Spoon Silver badge
        Joke

        Re: "plugging the holes in that decade-old code"

        "Each time you tempt something"

        Like offering catnip to kitties?

      2. Kiwi Silver badge
        Linux

        Re: "plugging the holes in that decade-old code"

        since I've got used to the Linux updater I can't believe how clumsy, buggy and slow the Windows one is

        One of the things the keeps me sold on Linux, and I've used to sell it to others as well. None of this waiting to install updates while shutting down and starting up, seldom any really large lots (unless you go for several months without updates!), and all done quickly and quietly in the background.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: "plugging the holes in that decade-old code"

      Ever thought the problem can be in your system, since the rest of the world installed it? Maybe it's time for a clean install of Window 10 - I wouldn't attempt an in-place upgrade <G>

      1. Sleep deprived

        Re: "plugging the holes in that decade-old code"

        No doubt the problem is in my system, but how can I fix Microsoft's inabilities at applying fixes to its own OS with an error message just saying "update failed"? Or is this all open-source code and I missed it?

      2. ThatOne Silver badge
        Thumb Down

        Re: "plugging the holes in that decade-old code"

        > Ever thought the problem can be in your system

        Yes but no, in this case the problem is clearly with Microsoft: As I said above, Microsoft themselves admit Windows Update is buggy, and try to give workarounds for when patches don't want to get installed. It's a little sad for a program they have been working 20 years on (Windows Update)...

        Real life example from December 2019: I made a clean install of Win7 on a VM (so no exotic drivers), and let it install all the updates and patches, so I have a working Windows VM for the years to come.

        Well, letting a clean, fresh install of Windows download and install all its patches isn't as trivial as I expected. A dozen patches didn't go through, whatever I tried. It took me 2 weeks and about 20 hours researching the Internet to finally manage to arrive at a point where everything seems installed (or just isn't flagged as missing anymore). (Not that I really care, this VM won't see the Internet ever again.)

    3. Dan 55 Silver badge

      Re: "plugging the holes in that decade-old code"

      It may be because you're missing KB4490628, install that first.

      2020 and Windows Update still can't work out dependencies. What a time to be alive.

      1. Sleep deprived

        Re: "plugging the holes in that decade-old code"

        It worked! You did better than Windows Updates, where clicking on the failure code would never yield any useful advice, month after month. If you need a referral letter to apply for a job at Microsoft, let me know :)

        1. Dan 55 Silver badge
          Alert

          Re: "plugging the holes in that decade-old code"

          I don't think I'll be needing one but thanks for the offer anyway (I think).

  14. Ramis101

    2 fingers to GCHQ then

    I still do interweb banking & send emails using XP, surely i should have been hacked to bits by now?

    Prob because i don't use a browser made by M$ nor an email client by them.

    W10 is just as infectable as xp,7 and the others in between if your a muppet & click on the *free* whatever links etc

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: 2 fingers to GCHQ then

      "surely i should have been hacked to bits by now?"

      You have. I'm just waiting until you actually have a decent amount in your bank account before I drain it all. :-)

      1. Ramis101

        Re: 2 fingers to GCHQ then

        LOL. You'll never know :)

        I knew this would get a butt-laod of down-votes. I've been getting that since vista came out, i looked at, stood back and proclaimed "fuck that"

        3rd party firewall, plus nat plus another nat & firewall. no-script. add block. no explorer, no outlook.

        I clean peoples machines of infections on a daily basis almost, but not mine strangely in spite of some healthy pr0n & wares surfing.

        Unfortunately, i can't tell you any more or i'll have to kill you ;)

        1. Sir Runcible Spoon Silver badge

          Re: 2 fingers to GCHQ then

          @Ramis101 - do you run any AV software by any chance?

  15. Philippe

    There is a W7 update bypass tool.

    Microsoft will continue to provide updates to companies which pay for it. The way Windows Updates on 7 will work going forward is by checking if you have the "extended support license " installed. If you don't, the updates won't install

    There is already a bypass tool out there for it so that you can pass the check. It's not 100% as it doesn't let you update using the Windows Update tool anymore but you can update manually.

    This should give people another 3 years to upgrade to 10 or do something else.

    1. NeilPost Bronze badge

      Re: There is a W7 update bypass tool.

      and PosTeady 7 and Windows 7 Embedded continue on Extended Support until Oct 2021.

  16. s. pam
    Black Helicopters

    Not upgrading my Mum's Win7 PC

    My Mum is 84 and suffering from Alzheimer's more and more every day.

    Given she can barely use the PC, even though it's got good A/C on it, this will likely lead to my installing SuSE (or equiv) on it next time I am in front of her PC.

    Not that she may recall she still has it.

  17. karlkarl Bronze badge

    "and you can't rely on Microsoft to keep on plugging the holes in that decade-old code"

    Why not? I think over 90% of Windows 10 is based on "decade-old code". As is Linux, BSD and macOS.

  18. IceC0ld Silver badge

    Win7 diehard ahoy

    not by choice, but by finances, my old as feck W7 box ill not support W10, so for me the issue is how to save up for the new PC and keep the existing device 'safe'

    no more banking on PC --- CHECK

    no more E-mails on PC --- CHECK

    main concern is that my gaming is to be interrupted, don't get me wrong, I am pants at all games, but enjoy dying in style :o)

    but if Emails and banking open up the W7 to all sorts of nefariousness, then why wont games / Steam etc

    but hey ho, we will find out soon enough, all back ups are up to date, NAS is offline, Zone Alarm installed and set to be a right pain :oP

    bring it on LOL

    if I DO go quiet in the following weeks, you will know I failed, and dying in style was altered to whining like a biatch :o)

  19. PaulVD
    Gimp

    Why are you being mean about my Win10 phone?

    See title.

  20. Red Right Hand
    Facepalm

    I'm not quite sure why there is this massive hype to get rid of the OS. I understand that network connected machines, particularly those that face the Internet and/or are not behind DMZ's/firewalls are definitely subject to possible security threats and should be mitigated appropriately (shouldn't you start considering the move to linux for those perimeter servers?)

    For businesses that use appropriate controls, particularly those that meet stringent compliance requirements, PCI, ISO, etc. they should be able to continue without too much of a fuss but should nonetheless work out a phased strategy to move away from a deprecated system

    1. JohnFen Silver badge

      > I'm not quite sure why there is this massive hype to get rid of the OS

      It's because Microsoft really, really, really wants you to be using Win 10.

      1. kmedcalf

        Because as long as just one person is using Windows 7 then Microsoft has to maintain all their Windows 7 licensing infrastructure and this stuff is quite a bodge to keep going for just one copy of Windows 7. So the sooner everyone gets rid of Windows 7 the sooner Microsoft can shut that stuff down.

    2. ThatOne Silver badge
      Devil

      > I'm not quite sure why there is this massive hype to get rid of the OS

      Because they don't want a second WinXP!

      WinXP took many years to die and outlived both its successors (Win8 and 8.1). So they decided to hit hard and use every trick in the book to get people off their Win7: Scaremongering, newly discovered bugs of catastrophic level, asteroids, everything.

  21. jimprdx

    No more Windows 7 machines left at work at all, in 2019 every one was upgraded to Windows 8.1! :) For Windows XP it's a different story, we have a few still running... Apparently there's a new version out called "Windows 10", but the authorities in charge haven't started testing that yet!

  22. C. Patrick

    How many holes could it have left to plug?

    How many more in win 10?

    Shouldn't we be OK with home routers, good anti virus / anti malware?

    1. Sir Runcible Spoon Silver badge

      Re: How many holes could it have left to plug?

      That depends on many things, such as (but not limited to):-

      -Your router

      -Which sites you browse

      -Which sites anyone else on your network browses

  23. herman Silver badge

    It was a kind an gentle OS

    Win7 was a kind and gentle Operating System, provided of course, that it is really dead.

    -- With apologies to Voltaire.

    1. ThatOne Silver badge
      Devil

      Re: It was a kind an gentle OS

      > Win7 was a kind and gentle Operating System

      What really, really scares me is that in a couple years people might say similar eulogies for Win10...

      There is no limit downwards...

  24. NeilPost Bronze badge

    Meanwhile PoSReady 7 and Windows Embedded 7 continue to get extended support until 12-Oct-2021... and paid for Win7 support available in parallel too.

    Any major vulnerabilities will get a fix like Win 2K3 and Win XP continue to get despite being way out of any support.

    What’s DataBarracks address, as they have breached WEEE disposal regulations and need grassed off.

    1. jelabarre59 Silver badge

      Meanwhile PoSReady 7 and Windows Embedded 7...

      Come on, MSWindows is *ALWAYS* "PoSReady"...

  25. mark l 2 Silver badge

    Anyone still using Windows 10 mobile will probably be much safer using it without any further security patches as I doubt that there will be many hackers, virus coders, malware writers even considering going after such as small install base. After all there are many more unpatched Android handsets in everyday use due to the manufacturers either being slow to patch against vulnerabilities or just don't release updates at all.

    I used my old phone for over 12 months without any security patches from the manufacturer.

    1. Kiwi Silver badge
      Black Helicopters

      I used my old phone for over 12 months without any security patches from the manufacturer.

      Over 4 years on my current phone with no updates and no facility to. Previous phone got 7 or 8 years before its keypad started failing, also no updates.

      Next phone will probably be a Doro or something similar. What can I say? I prefer basic phones, crappy no-name tablets, basic ancient laptops, and as much-as-I-can-afford desktops. The stuff that travels with me, if I crash I don't need a tablet or laptop or broken smart phone, I need a working reliable phone (hence also my liking of flip phones - get some extra protection for the vital bits). And if someone steals my gear off the bike, I'd rather they get a $50 2nd hand tablet and a laugh-themselves-hysterical phone than a $1,000+ phone.

      (if I can find a basic flip phone with no FB etc "features" installed, I'll be very happy! Better still if I can tether over BT or something)

  26. my cats breath smells like cat food

    I've managed to convince one stalwart to install ubuntu on his aging Win7 lappie, here's hoping it has the oomph to deal with the modern gnome interface. Disclaimer: I've been using linux since the 0.9x days and I am settling into systemd life quite nicely, a needed upgrade on sysvinit with a reasonably unix way of doing things. Having not seen the planned systemd-home I agree that it sounds like a bucket of bollocks but there's no arguing that handling user storage requirements can be a pain. See also user memory limits. One thing is certain, it's far easier to deal with than whatever horror Microsoft has foisted upon lUsers in nightmare on windows 10 street.

    All we need in linux land is real open support for decent gaming graphics and it will be ready for that segment of userland. for anyone who's not into gaming there's no excuse not to make the switch.

  27. Greywolf40

    Much ado about not much. Some XP machines are still doing good work for their owners. Same will be true for W7 hardware. Old machines are good for all kinds of offline tasks, so why trash them?

    Anyhow, security risks are mostly the users, and out-dated security software. There's no reason to panic just because MS will noi longer patch holes in Windows 7.

  28. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Buying Windows 10

    Why is a product key available "legitimately" on Amazon from several sellers for less than £20?

    Amazon is a reputable seller, so I am sure it's fine!

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      @AC - Re: Buying Windows 10

      They're leftovers from the long lasting campaign of free upgrade to Windows 10. Don't buy them, they're overpriced. :)

      1. kmedcalf

        Re: @AC - Buying Windows 10

        Upgrading to Windows 10 is still free.

        1. Kiwi Silver badge
          Trollface

          Re: @AC - Buying Windows 10

          Upgrading to Windows 10 is still free.

          Not really no.. It's cost productivity, sanity, privacy, eyeballs (looking at the FLATSO FUGLY WIN-TEN-ICK DESKTOP is MURDER on the EYEBALLS, err hang on a minute need to turn my BB mode OFF...)

          (Er, where is Bob? Thought he'd be all over these threads!)

    2. Ken Moorhouse Silver badge

      Re: product key available "legitimately" on Amazon from several sellers for less than £20

      We know that MS has the ability to remote-wipe everything in your Documents folders, so that might put some people off taking a risk. Unfortunately for MS dthey id precisely this for legitimate users a while ago.

      https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/10/10/microsoft_windows_deletion_bug/

      I have also lost count of the number of times I've had to give people openoffice so they could amend Word documents and Excel spreadsheets whilst I find out why MS have disabled access to their (full-price) Office Shite for licencing anomalies.

    3. Roland6 Silver badge

      Re: Buying Windows 10

      >Why is a product key available "legitimately" on Amazon from several sellers for less than £20?

      Amazon is a reputable seller, so I am sure it's fine!

      Amazon themselves might be reputable, but not all sellers listed and especially that only sell really cheap MS Windows and Office (digital download) licence keys are reputable...

      Been looking this week for licences and it is quite a minefield - I feel sorry for any legitimate sellers of discounted MS license keys (are there any left?), as given the number of scammers selling dodgy keys, it is very difficult to distinguish between businesses, meaning it is often quicker to simply stick to the big names and pay full price...

  29. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Windows Update Hell

    Sometime last year, my perfectly good Atom system dropped its Wifi support entirely.

    Troubleshooted the problem to what looked like a broken keyboard, yet Fn + any other button worked as did the rest of the keyboard.

    Strangely enough it had a 256GB SSD and 4GB RAM, and was *technically* supported by 10 alas not the graphics driver which was

    some horrible bodge from Hell downloaded from insert_dodgy_driver_site.con but good enough to run 64 bit 7 with graphics maxed out.

    One of these days I will dig it up from the AOL layer and turn it into a picture frame PC with external card probably stolen from the

    WEEE pile of dead all-in-one printers, with a "RIP W7 2009-2020" and M$ tombstone logo etched on the inside of the glass.

    Pretty sure a few blinkenlights can be added over the motherboard, with a couple of tiny bargraphs for the dual SSDs (HD0+HD1) and

    some sort of cooling bodge.

    Not sure about remote power though, any tips?

  30. KBeee
    Facepalm

    And weirdly, today (16-01-2020), this laptop got five Win7 updates?

    1. ThatOne Silver badge

      > And weirdly, today (16-01-2020), this laptop got five Win7 updates?

      The 14th was "patch Thursday", the day MS released the last patches for Win7. I guess they took some time to arrive to you?

  31. John_3_16

    Trump & the senate majority support Win 10

    I will hang with my Win 7 until it dies a natural death. I am also slowly migrating to an all Linux system. One that can run my dieing Win 7 OS in a protected bubble. My needs are simple. I do not need ICBMs on my desktop or laptop. My 22 & 12 gauge still work fine.

    MS had huge problems updating Win 7 correctly. To be honest, they have grown too big & too greedy to even recognize or care for any individual human being using their junk. Like any controlling cartel, they push huge amounts of the "stuff" & could care less who gets hurt using it. My experience has been that it is the users who end up solving most of the problems & are most approachable for advice. Not MS.

    Linux may prove the best of both worlds & a new learning adventure as well. Win 10 has given me small headaches already just reading about the absolute disaster it has proven to be for so many using it. M$ doesn't seem to listen or learn. Insanity is doing the same thing over & over & expecting a different result. It is not working, M$. You keep it.

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