back to article APEX predator? Chinese phone-flinger Vivo teases upcoming concept phone

Chinese phone maker Vivo has wowed attendees of the past two Mobile World Congress megafests with intriguing — and hugely divisive — APEX concept phones it hoped would set the industry tempo for years to come. To set the scene, in 2018, it wheeled out a handset with an almost bezel-less screen, and a selfie camera hidden under …

  1. sbt Silver badge
    Angel

    Except for the fragility issue...

    I prefer the idea of a pop-up camera rather than stupid notches in the screen. I'd be happy with just a rear camera, but I get that's not most people's preference.

    Anyway, glad there's still some folks trying to innovate in this space. I'd still like a smaller screen so it'd still fit in my pocket, though. This screen size war is as pointless as the SUV height war.

    1. tiggity Silver badge

      Re: Except for the fragility issue...

      Agree totally on front facing camera

      For non selfie takers no need for a front facing camera - rear is only one used

      1. GruntyMcPugh Silver badge

        Re: Except for the fragility issue...

        @tiggity: "no need for a front facing camera"

        Perhaps it's time to get rid of the front facing camera for public safety. There was a story in the press this week about a 21 year old Instagrammer who fell off a cliff in Australia, one presumes yet another selfie victim.

        1. Alumoi

          Re: Except for the fragility issue...

          That's evoluion in action, aka Darwin Awards. What's wrong with that?

    2. Craig 2 Silver badge

      Re: Except for the fragility issue...

      Pop-up selfie camera could also help with privacy concerns of cameras being activated silently without the user's knowledge. Hard to miss if it appears unexpectedly. (I assume it's motorised?)

      Selfie camera occasionally gets used as an ad-hoc mirror, or for checking injuries from falling off the MTB... :)

      1. Muscleguy Silver badge

        Re: Except for the fragility issue...

        Indeed, was sitting behind a young woman on the bus one morning recently who was finishing up her makeup using the front camera as a mirror.

    3. dajames Silver badge

      Re: Except for the fragility issue...

      I prefer the idea of a pop-up camera rather than stupid notches in the screen.

      However odious stupid notches and holes in the screen may be, the fragility issues are far worse. My current phone has a notch, which I hate, but I wouldn't have bought one with a pop-up.

      1. teknopaul Silver badge

        Re: Except for the fragility issue...

        Moving parts and fragility is an issue sometimes, not necessarily.

        E.g. I prefer pop-up popout swapable and fixable over soldered on.

        I never had a Ericsson or nokia foldable break

        .

  2. Natalie Gritpants Jr

    Might be cheaper to have just one really good camera on the back together with a small low res screen on the back for selfies/facetime.

  3. Artifixprime

    Have a OnePlus 7 pro and the pop-up works a treat.

    The kids love it too - hours (OK, minutes) of entertainment :)

  4. Nelbert Noggins

    The Asus ZenFone 6 works for me.

    Hardly use a front camera and the mechanism stays solidly in place in the rear facing position.

    The 180 degree rotation makes panoramic shots trivial if you ever want to take them.

  5. SonofRojBlake

    Does nobody video call?

    Facetime/Whatsapp/Skype/whatever? My mother would get withdrawal symptoms if she didn't see her grandson live on her iPad at least a couple of times a week. For that alone a front-facing camera is a must, even if you've never taken a selfie and abhor the very concept.

  6. Epitune

    I don't even have a smartphone

    Never going to get one either..I think it's the dumbest (and most useless) thing since facebook. :-)

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2020