back to article I see your blue passport and raise you a green number plate: UK mulls rewards scheme for zero-emission vehicles

The UK government has a cunning plan to help meet its carbon emissions targets: green number plates. Today the Department for Transport published a consultation on the number plates (PDF) as a way to allow zero-emission vehicles to benefit from incentives such as cheaper parking. In the foreword, transport minister Grant …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    The opposite of high-viz

    Black on green - the print will really stand out. Perhaps they'll need to alter the number-plate reading eyesight test?

    1. ArrZarr Silver badge
      Joke

      Re: The opposite of high-viz

      Which is why the article says a green flash at the side of the plate rather than, as you say, black on green.

      Alternatively, have the characters in embossed white on the top of a nice dark, nationalistic green, say British racing green and we can go back to the days of yore.

    2. Someone Else Silver badge
      WTF?

      Re: The opposite of high-viz

      Naturally, the gub'mint couldn't be arsed to provide white numbers on a green background, now could they?

      1. Fungus Bob Silver badge
        Trollface

        Re: The opposite of high-viz

        White would be racist...

  2. A K Stiles
    Coat

    Identifying 'green' vehicles

    Well, they could kill (revive?) two birds with one stone and have the audio warning for the EVs be like the reversing warning on the bin lorries:

    "ATTENTION! ELECTRIC VEHICLE APPROACHING!"

    Coat please, the green one, with the bamboo toothbrush in the pocket...

  3. Commswonk Silver badge

    Groan...

    Given that the criminal fraternity don't seem to have any difficulties in obtaining number plates to which they are not entitled to enable the cloning of vehicles I suspect that there will be no more than about 24 hours elapse before ICE vehicles are running around with "green" plates to which they have no entitlement in an attempt to obtain the "benefits" of an EV plate.

    I would hope (stupid of me I know) that misrepresenting a vehicle's source of motive power will become a specific offence.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Groan...

      Before a ticket is issued, the DVLA-lookup will determine the validity of green credentials. Parking wardens have access to similar info as well surely so can issue tickets accordingly.

      Not entirely sure how a green plate is going to be useful except as a way to let other drivers know they are entitled to use the bus lane as they waft by with a smug look on their face saying "I had an extra 30 minutes in bed 'cos I can use this lane"...

      1. Trev 2

        Re: Groan...

        Of course if the bus lane was being used properly, they'd be stuck every 30 seconds behind another bus carrrying loads of commuters who have ditched their cars.

        Taxies can already do this and are probably cheaper than a Tesla.

        1. MJB7 Silver badge

          Re: Taxis

          Taxis are probably a really good use for electric vehicles. Taxi owners care much more about running costs than initial costs (compared to normal drivers), because the vehicles are in use for so much more of the time. (Time to recharge is an issue of course.)

          1. MiguelC Silver badge

            Re: Taxis

            I recently made an Uber trip in a Nissan Leaf and when asked about it's range, the driver told me the car had to be charged 4 times a day. Even using fast chargers it's going to be still a lot more than non-EVs, and still cars (Ubers and taxis alike) are not making any money.

            1. Splurg The Barbarian

              Re: Taxis

              That's because the mark 1 Leaf has a truly horrendous range of about 90-130 miles tops, real world 70-105 or so, new one does 168-239 depending on model. Real world probably a bit less.

              Most new model EVs do 250 + real world probably from 215/220 upwards.

              One of my colleagues at work as a taxi driving friend. They shifted to a Leaf 3 years ago and can not believe how little the running costs are now compared to his diesel.

              One question about this will this apply to hybrids (plug in or otherwise)? If so can see a lot of those bought for lower company car tax burning fossil fuel while gaining the benefits. I had an Outlander PHEV as a personal car and binned it early for a diesel as the petrol mpg was poor and I could only get 17-23 miles of EV range (seemed to be an issue where some were really poor on EV while others were much better even with the same driver & driven in same way).

            2. phuzz Silver badge

              Re: Taxis

              My friend has a Tesla, and I've queried it's lack of range before, but firstly, he has a small child, so the distance between nappy changes is well within the Tesla's range.

              Also, once you've driven for two hundred odd miles, even in a petrol car you'll probably want to stop for fifteen minutes to streach your legs (etc.). That's all the time the car needs to charge back up to get you another hundred miles.

              I'll stick to burning dinos for now though.

          2. The Eee 701 Paddock

            Re: (electric) taxis

            A couple of months ago, on the spur of the moment, we at E7P Towers decided on a weekend break in Amsterdam (while we can, etc.). Upon leaving Schiphol airport, we looked at the options for getting to our hotel, and ultimately headed for the taxi rank.

            They were *all* Teslas... and let's just say, by the time we reached the hotel our daughter was saying to us, "can we have one of these?"

            For that matter, Amsterdam also has a great tram system too - what I wouldn't give for something like that where we live... but that's a whole other ball-of-Edam game :-)

            1. D@v3

              Re: (electric) taxis

              @E7P

              Was going to say similar. Was in the 'dam a couple of years back and was impressed / surprised to see the vast majority of taxis being Teslas.

      2. Arthur the cat Silver badge

        Re: Groan...

        Not entirely sure how a green plate is going to be useful except as a way to let other drivers know they are entitled to use the bus lane as they waft by with a smug look on their face saying "I had an extra 30 minutes in bed 'cos I can use this lane"...

        It's what's known as "nudge theory" - no draconian rules, no real cost, just an opportunity to virtue signal and one-up the neighbours.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Groan...

          "I had an extra 30 minutes in bed 'cos I can use this lane"...

          It's what's known as "nudge theory" - no draconian rules, no real cost, just an opportunity to virtue signal and one-up the neighbours.

          Except what are the chances of the drivers in the normal lanes letting the smug gits out of the bus lane when they want to pass a bus at a stop, or when they want to turn right? "Sorry I was late boss, I saved 30 mins coming down the bus lane, then a was stuck for an hour trying to turn into the office"

          1. Rich 11 Silver badge

            Re: Groan...

            "Sorry I was late boss, I saved 30 mins coming down the bus lane, then a was stuck for an hour trying to turn into the office"

            Easily fixed: just move the business to the other side of the road.

        2. Flywheel Silver badge

          Re: Groan...

          Based on current prices, if you can afford an EV you're probably rich enough to be worth mugging, when compared with that pauper in his BMW.

          1. Mooseman Silver badge

            Re: Groan...

            "if you can afford an EV you're probably rich enough to be worth mugging"

            Only in the UK. Other countries provide massive subsidies and tax breaks for using EVs which makes them far more affordable. In Norway people buy a Tesla rather than a BMW or Merc or Audi because they cost about the same or less (VAT at 25% is taken off, followed by various subsidies) - your Tesla model 3 at £45k here is about £33k in Norway before additional subsidies.

            1. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge

              Re: Groan...

              Other countries provide massive subsidies and tax breaks for using EVs which makes them far more affordable.

              All that does is put your taxes up, so you're still paying in the end.

              1. SImon Hobson Silver badge

                Re: Groan...

                Correction - everyone else is paying for it.

      3. Mark 85 Silver badge

        Re: Groan...

        Not entirely sure how a green plate is going to be useful except as a way to let other drivers know they are entitled

        I'm thinking this might lead to a "Car Wars" scenario where each side will be battling for lanes on the roadways and also parking spots. Class warfare of the entitled and non-entitled coming soon to street near you.

    2. IceC0ld Silver badge
      Joke

      Re: Groan...

      may take ME slightly less than 24 hrs, but a pot of green paint, and VIOLA my V8 Corvette gets cheaper parking - kerching :o)

      1. tiggity Silver badge

        Re: Groan...

        Depending on shade of the green flash some green electrical tape might be even easier

      2. Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese Silver badge

        Re: Groan...

        and VIOLA my V8 Corvette gets cheaper parking

        Sounds like some sort of a fiddle to me

    3. macjules Silver badge

      Re: Groan...

      By ‘criminal fraternity’ I presume you mean Mr Greg Shapps and his mates. Cheeky sod to take advantage of the EV incentive and then to cancel it.

  4. IGotOut

    Better incentive.

    Remove VAT on electric cars.

    Done.

    1. Unep Eurobats
      Facepalm

      Re: Better incentive.

      Or end the nine-year freeze on fuel duty?

      1. macjules Silver badge

        Re: Better incentive.

        Or cancel the doubletap VAT surcharge on fuel duty. "hey, lets charge a sales tax on tax!"

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Better incentive.

      but this would hurt the treasury, no? How to have it both ways, ie. electric cars that people pay themselves for (3 x price of a petrol one). And then, make them pay "green" extra to compensate for loss of treasurey profits from fuel-related taxes and such. OK, how about petrol v. electric road wars...

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Reminds me of diesel incentives. It'll only be a matter of time before they start charging.

    1. chivo243 Silver badge

      Nice one! Before they start charging!

    2. drawoC esuomynonA

      And it's already being discussed, there was an article in the Times about it the other day.

  6. mark l 2 Silver badge

    While these incentives might be good now, how long before the councils realise the bus lanes are backed up and they aren't making money from car parks because they are chocked full of EVs and so drop these incentives?

    What needs to be done to get people in EVs is get the price of new EVs to be cheaper than the equivalent ICE vehicles. Either through a reduction in VAT for EVs, increased tax on ICE vehicles or a scrappage scheme to get older polluting vehicles off the road.

    1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

      "Either through a reduction in VAT for EVs, increased tax on ICE vehicles"

      Which way would you bet?

  7. Dan 55 Silver badge
    Meh

    Distinctive marking

    If only we had a circular disc which could attach to the inside windscreen and allow us to "differentiate vehicles".

    We could put stuff on there like eco credentials, if the road tax has been paid or not...

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Go

      Re: Distinctive marking

      You mean something akin to the parking privileges available (in theory at least) to disabled people? Surely anyone enforcing (most) parking rules already has to check in the windscreen for blue badges?

      Go icon 'cos it's green, but should probably have used t'other one.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Distinctive marking

      If only we had a circular disc which could attach to the inside windscreen and allow us to "differentiate vehicles".

      They do that in France, a coloured disc with 6 values depending on the perceived pollution levels (i.e. using meaningless CO2 figures). When pollution in a city reaches a certain level, cars with the 'worst' discs are banned (yes, stable doors & all that).

      My yellow disc is now so faded by the sun that all you can read is the black printed licence plate number across the middle.

      1. Strahd Ivarius

        Re: Distinctive marking

        Well it is supposed to work that way, but it is never enforced.

        As an example, such a restriction was put in place last August in Paris (strangely it was after a week where most Parisian were out of the city, so not much car traffic before...).

        Since it was on a week-end where people were coming back from holidays, the restrictions were not enforced, otherwise almost nobody would have been able to go home ;-)

        And in all the other cases there was always good reasons to waive the restriction...

  8. LenG

    Green?

    I drive a petrol car. It has a small engine and I only do about 3000 miles a year. Much greener than an SUV lugging around a ton of lithium ion batteries but guess who will get the subsidized parking, despite taking up twice as much parking space.

    1. gc73

      Re: Green?

      Where I live all the car parking spaces are the same size. Are they different where you are?

      I guess you could argue having a child means you take up more space because there are sometimes parent and child parking at supermarkets.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Green?

        Isn't that supermarket parking to help with parents needing to faff about with prams, child seats, and above all car doors swung fully open while they strap the infants down?

      2. tiggity Silver badge

        Re: Green?

        @gc73

        Maybe commentard referred to parking spaces that are common in many plcaes and still seen to be based on car sizes from early 1970s (when a "big" family car was typically smaller than a modern "small" car such as a Fiesta).

        Some parking spaces near me are a struggle for small cars and Chelsea Tractors always overflow the space

      3. Wellyboot Silver badge

        Re: Green?

        Some quick numbers - The normal UK parking bay is 2.4m x 4.8m. (8x16 ft. as was)

        Nearly 60 years ago when the Ford Cortina mk1 was 1.55m Wid. x 4.28m Len (26cm of bay free at each end). - its 4.55m diagonal size was much shorter than the bay size and easy to parallel park.

        Now a new Tesla S3 (slightly smaller than a VW passat) is 1.85m Wid. x 4.7m Len (5cm of bay free at each end)). with a diagonal of 5.04m you can't park this sized car in a bay without overlapping each of the adjoining bays by 12cm. It's not possible to park three S3 sized cars in three contiguous bays and for the middle one to exit. The other Tesla models are just outright longer than a bay (S-4.98m X-5.03m) as are many large familty cars & SUVs.

        With Nose-in bays it gets worse, the Cortina has doors about 10cm deep while modern cars are about 25 deep (safety regs.), modern cars have about 5cm of open door gap when they reach the edge of their bay and about 35cm when they contact the next car over, The old Cortinas have 85cm between the cars. parking an SUV between two other SUVs requires exiting via the sun roof or rear.

        1. Rich 11 Silver badge

          Re: Green?

          It doesn't help that more of us* are fat bastards who need more room to get in and out.

          *Speaking for a friend.

  9. elenmirie

    Capitalist pig (green edition)

    I've just bought every bit of green pigment on the planet. Pay me.

    1. Adrian Harvey

      Re: Capitalist pig (green edition)

      It really does grow on trees you know!

      1. Kane Silver badge
        Joke

        Re: Capitalist pig (green edition)

        "It really does grow on trees you know!"

        Well, since we decided to adopt the leaf as legal tender, we have, of course, all become immensely rich. But we have also run into a small inflation problem on account of the high level of leaf availability, which means that, I gather, the current going rate has something like three deciduous forests buying one small pot of green paint.

        1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

          Re: Capitalist pig (green edition)

          I believe the Amazonian farmers are working on a solution.

  10. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    So not only do lucky people who can afford a new electric car get their purchase subsidised by everyone else, they also get to use the roads for free, use of free charge points and now they get subsidised parking and more benefits besides. Why so many subidies? Electric cars still consume a lot of energy shifting half a ton of batteries around. The reduced running / service costs of electric cars ought to be enough of an incentive. Why not reward those who avoid car journeys?

    Also why punish conscientious vehicle owners for avoiding the premature scrappage of a servicable vehicle? Every extra mile obtained from an existing vehicle avoids the significant environmental impact of building a new one. The more miles we get from our vehicles the better overall, but this incentive encourages consumerist consumption.

    The government are also floating the idea of introducing tolls for roads the taxpayer has already paid for, on the fabricated premise that electric cars don't pay road tax. Well treat road users equally and make them all pay road tax!

    1. Roland6 Silver badge

      At some point, within the next 5~10 years I suspect, the government is going to have to introduce fuel duties and road taxes on electric cars; they are getting too much money currently from ICE vehicle owners to simply accept a massive decline in revenues.

      1. PhoenixKebab

        A tax on EV's would help pay for upgrading the grid and building new power stations.

        1. Spanners Silver badge
          Facepalm

          @PhoenixKebab

          Ecellent. As we don't need to upgrade the grid or build new power stations to cope with the increasing number of electric vehicles, that means that we don't need to tax them!

          1. Wellyboot Silver badge

            Re: @PhoenixKebab

            There are over 38 million licensed vehicles on UK roads including over half a million HGVs, almost all are using oil derived power. The power requirement does not drop just because they all go electric. The HGVs will require battery charging in the MW range, spread across a day thats over 20,000 per hour and none of the UKs current truck stops have plug in points.

            The UK oil refineries have a combined production capacity of some 60+M tonnes per year, I believe that the electrical power equivilent of the product is something like a constant 80GW, this is quite a bit more than the average 31GW national load the electrical system currently copes with.

            Even with the lower % transmission loss of the electric grid compared to the thermal energy loss from ICE there is still a major national upgrade required to provide the power.

            The idea that we can replace all current oil & gas powered devices with the current electric generation & transmission network capacity is laughable.

            1. Flywheel Silver badge

              Re: @PhoenixKebab

              Obligatory Top 5 Electric Trucks video!

            2. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

              Re: @PhoenixKebab

              "The UK oil refineries have a combined production capacity of some 60+M tonnes per year, I believe that the electrical power equivilent of the product is something like a constant 80GW, this is quite a bit more than the average 31GW national load the electrical system currently copes with."

              Out of curiosity, how much grid power is currently used in refining oil into it's various products, particularly petrol and diesel? Is there much of an offset there or is it negligible?

          2. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: @PhoenixKebab

            There's a very fine line between sarcasm and stupidity, and I'm really not sure which side this post sits on??

          3. SImon Hobson Silver badge

            Re: @PhoenixKebab

            As we don't need to upgrade the grid ...

            That's not what the "get a smart meter" ads on radio are saying. On those adverts, they claim that lecky consumption is forecast to double, and that's not going to be reliably provided without some significant upgrades in dispatchable generating capacity.

      2. Death_Ninja

        Treasury revenue

        There are a number of different ideas they are floating at the moment, but what is definitely true is that the current regime of subsidy on purchase, zero road tax and standard electricity prices will not remain in the coming years.

        All of these things will be swept away "when the EV just becomes 'the car'" (as the government propaganda is telling us).

        I'd guess we'll see these measures in place as soon as EV's reach 20% of the vehicles on the road - not too far away I'd guess.

        Some of the different options being considered are outlined here:

        https://www.current-news.co.uk/blogs/the-tax-man-cometh-how-might-the-government-solve-the-riddle-of-ev-taxation

        The next thing after tailpipe emissions btw is particle emissions from tyres and brakes. Expect to see low pollution zones where electric vehicles are given a pollution rating and you pay a pollution charge to drive a 4.5 tonne electric peasant crusher vs a Renault Zoe. Probably also a significant scrappage charge on EOL battery packs.

        One thing is for sure though - all those people that imagine they are escaping the endless tax war on motorists by buying an EV are wrong.

    2. Cederic Silver badge

      Yeah, I see this as an attack on poor people that can't afford new cars, that live in flats that have no charging points, that need a car in order to participate in society but don't have the luxury of a high income.

      Green number plates? Sure. Virtue signal all you like.

      Using them to lord it over the rest of society? Expect a response.

    3. macjules Silver badge

      Unfortunately we live in a modern, digital age with a betamax 1970's government which is bereft of means to steal money from tax the population.

    4. 2+2=5 Silver badge
      Joke

      > Why not reward those who avoid car journeys?

      We could, but the money's all being spent on building a railway from London to Birmingham.

      1. Wellyboot Silver badge

        Good idea, my parents have been avoiding car journeys everyday since they retired.

        Can it be backdated :)

      2. Strahd Ivarius
        Joke

        And then they'll still have to build to railway from Birmingham to London

        1. Mooseman Silver badge

          "then they'll still have to build to railway from Birmingham to London"

          We already have one. HS2 will save a mighty 20 minutes on that journey.

          1. Colin 29

            Despite the misleading name, HS2 is primarily intended to increase capacity not reduce journey time

            1. Roland6 Silver badge

              >HS2 is primarily intended to increase capacity not reduce journey time

              The "increase capacity" came later, HS2 was conceived as a new shiny trainset for (Labour) politicians to show how technically with-it they were back in circa 2008, word got out and a queue of politicians from all parties formed, as they were also keen to be seen to be forward looking, with-it etc. etc.. Having had the idea politicians then went looking for things that could be misrepresented to support the need for HS2. I'm sure some spin doctor could come up with how HS2 will be beneficial to blockchain...

    5. Mooseman Silver badge

      "tolls for roads the taxpayer has already paid for, on the fabricated premise that electric cars don't pay road tax"

      All very well, except your road tax has sod all to do with roads. Road maintenance is paid for by local taxes by and large, your "road tax" (vehicle excise duty) goes to a government fund. Toll roads would be a good way of funding roads directly, and making those who use them most pay relatively more. Don't expect our glorious leaders to cut excise duty on cars to compensate, of course.

  11. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Money money money

    I'm sure I've read that the Treasury is alerady in a panic at the drop in road duty caused by the small switch to EVs and it's looking again at charging by mileage. Which would of course involve tracking every car on the road as a lovely bonus for our facist overlords.

    1. Captain Hogwash Silver badge

      Re: Money money money

      This would involve creating another expensive layer of bureaucracy. So of course they'll do it. The same outcome (without the tracking) could be achieved at no cost by simply raising the tax on fuel. so of course they'll do this too. Bastards!

      1. Kane Silver badge
        Joke

        Re: Money money money

        "This would involve creating another expensive layer of bureaucracy."

        And another database! Don't forget the database!!! Protected by blockchain!!!! With added cryptocurrency!!!!!

  12. chivo243 Silver badge

    Go Dutch?

    In NL the road tax is determined by two things:

    1) Horsepower of the engine(emissions? and ability to tear up the road?)

    2) Weight of the car (wear and tear on the road?)

    My 1L engine on a roller skate works for me...

    1. Death_Ninja

      Re: Go Dutch?

      TBH the idea of vehicle weight being a major factor is something I've long wondered why nothing has been done about in the UK.

      It goes without saying that the more the weight, the more the energy needed to propel it, therefore the more the pollution.

      Why don't we simply set a 1 tonne limit for personal vehicles and everything else is commercial?

      Why does a 2019 Vauxhall Astra weigh ~1.8 tonnes? The 1990's version weighed 900kg.

      And that's only an Astra - not some monster peasant crusher 4x4.

      1. Chloe Cresswell

        Re: Go Dutch?

        Well, if you remove things like the side impact protection systems, etc, I'm sure you'd reduce the weight of the 2019 astra a lot.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Go Dutch?

          Maybe go some way to reducing overpopulation at the same time ;-)

      2. Laura Kerr

        Re: Go Dutch?

        "Why does a 2019 Vauxhall Astra weigh ~1.8 tonnes? The 1990's version weighed 900kg. And that's only an Astra - not some monster peasant crusher 4x4."

        It weighs HOW MUCH? Sheesh, that's about the same as my Land Rover Defender, which is a monster peasant crusher 4x4. Not even my old V6 Vectra was as heavy as that. Are they casting the engine blocks from depleted uranium, or just piling on the bells and whistles?

      3. Joe Montana

        Re: Go Dutch?

        Cheaper cars actually weigh more than the more expensive models, due to the use of cheaper but heavier components and materials. And the average weight of vehicles has been going up due to the increase in features (mainly safety features).

        Many highend cars are made of carbon fibre or aluminium, cheaper cars tend to still be made of steel.

        1. Flywheel Silver badge

          Re: Go Dutch?

          If you can find a Trabant they weigh about 600Kg... I believe cardboard was used extensively in the construction, especially in the brake linings.

      4. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge

        Re: Go Dutch?

        the idea of vehicle weight being a major factor is something I've long wondered why nothing has been done about in the UK.

        Because compared to the damage done by 48 tonne lorries, cars are irrelevant. The companies that test road longevity don't even bother to take car traffic into account, it has so little additional impact. IIRC the damage done is proportional to the 4th power of the vehicle weight.

    2. Roland6 Silver badge

      Re: Go Dutch?

      >My 1L engine on a roller skate works for me...

      Trouble is the point weight of that is probably more than my 2L family mover, due to your roller skate having smaller wheels and thus contact point(s) with the road...

  13. Mike 137 Bronze badge

    Green number plates, green cars, green as grass?

    "Green number plates have the potential to be a powerful motivator to encourage road users to shift to cleaner vehicles"

    As in "encourage the rich to buy expensive new cars that shift the pollution from the road to the power station".

    Practically every single "green initiative" so far has (probably unintentionally) merely made it possible for the rich to carry on as before while limiting the options of the poor.

    1. Joe Montana

      Re: Green number plates, green cars, green as grass?

      Nothing unintentional about it...

      In fact, pricing the poor off the roads will result in less traffic for the rich.

    2. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

      Re: Green number plates, green cars, green as grass?

      "shift the pollution from the road to the power station"

      That on it's own isn't an issue. In fact it's a benefit since you only need to clean the pollution at one very large exhaust instead of carrying around the equipment on 1000's of cars. (times the number of power stations)

      Other than that, yes, I get your point :-)

  14. Velv Silver badge
    Mushroom

    Quite simply this is further shaming of the poor - it punishes those who are not in a position to purchase an up to date vehicle, and tells them they are not welcome in our towns and cities.

    Why not just have the poor wear hi-viz vests?

  15. tiggity Silver badge

    Wealthy

    EVs are still for the relatively wealthy

    I mainly use public transport for journeys of any size BUT use a car also (in the sticks, no public transport near me so have to drive to reach a bus / train station - cycling not an option as too many silly drivers and vehicle crashes on unlit narrow twisty country roads & don't want to end up in intensive car or worse if risked cycling)

    Small car I have is over 10 years old & would love to replace it with EV (cost of repair getting significant)ds replacing as starting to have lots of mechanical issues so needs replacing anyway) .

    But .. cost

    New EV car is massively expensive (NB always purchased petrol cars second hand anyway so my budget less than new petrol car price)

    Minimal EV second hand market - so second hand not a viable option.

    So, purchase likely to be yet another small second hand car to (metaphorically) drive into the ground.

    1. 0laf Silver badge

      Re: Wealthy

      So you're rich enough to buy a new EV witha green plate.

      Why sir step up and have some free parking and free charging as well. You know you're worth it.

      To the social worker oik in the 20yr old diesel, back of the lot for you and it's £15 a day for your stinking jalopy.

      1. holmegm Bronze badge

        Re: Wealthy

        They want the social worker to use public transport. If that limits her employment options, oh well; not their problem.

  16. Jason Bloomberg Silver badge
    Devil

    "plates with a green dash on the left-hand side"

    Fantastic. We can all become environmentally friendly for the cost of a few inches of green electrical insulating tape.

  17. Lee D Silver badge

    A short-term incentive at best.

    Also, I can never be eligible. I rent a flat in a managed estate where the private allocated car parking space is not within cable range of my flat, and where the letting agreement actually includes a "no trailing cables, nothing out of the windows" clause.

    Hence I will have to wait until my landlord's management agent installs a several-KW charger inside my private parking space. The alternative is to park my car some half-a-kilometre away from my house and leave it unattended overnight in a town centre car park with precisely two electric parking slots. I'm not sure what that would do to the insurance but I'm certain it won't be positive. While it may be good exercise, it's not why I own a car, or live in a flat with an allocated parking space.

    For reference: The entrance to my flat involves going down a dark, unlit alleyway to a dark, unlit garden which they have told myself (and all the other residents for 20+ years because literally everyone who has ever lived there has complained) that they can't illuminate the path as there's no utility lighting down there, only individual metered residential connections. So... good luck with that! They can't be bothered to install the infrastructure for a 5W LED bulb for the last 20+ years, with health-and-safety liability, I'm sure they'll jump straight on the electric-fast-charger bandwagon and dig up all the parking spaces just for me to have a "green" car...

    And when we're all using the bus lanes, and all using green electricity, and all the pigs are flying, then we can safely say that all those incentives will evaporate and our electric fancy cars will end up costing just as much to run as our old ICE cars did - plus inflation - because otherwise there's a massive drop in revenue.

    How about no?

    1. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge

      they can't illuminate the path as there's no utility lighting down there, only individual metered residential connections.

      I bought some solar-powered lights for exactly that purpose. Solar panel on the edge of the roof, LED light giving nice bright light on the patio when someone steps outside. Less than 30 quid, IIRC.

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