back to article Xilinx FPGA. Nvidia GPU storage. 56-core Intel Xeons versus AMD next-gen Epyc. It's all kicking off in data-center world

Register vultures and readers alike are off on summer vacation, or attending hacker comic con in the desert, right now, and yet the wheels of news keep turning in the data center world. So, for those still logged in, here's a quick summary of announcements from the server room this week. Xilinx has added the U50 card to its …

  1. MiguelC Silver badge

    "if you need to ask how much gear like this costs"

    I wonder if any enterprise buys any hardware before knowing how much it costs and without doing price/performance comparisons between competing kit.

    1. Fatman Silver badge

      Re: "if you need to ask how much gear like this costs"

      <quote>I wonder if any enterprise buys any hardware before knowing how much it costs and without doing price/performance comparisons between competing kit.</quote>

      You know damn well that the beancounters expect it.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: "if you need to ask how much gear like this costs"

      I wonder if any enterprise buys any hardware before knowing how much it costs and without doing price/performance comparisons between competing kit.

      No, they just buy Intel because AMD kit is perpetually "unavailable" from their usual supplier.

      https://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/05/13/intel_europe_fine/

      Intel paid retailer Media Saturn Holding on condition it only stocked machines with Intel chips. The company also made direct payments to computer makers to delay and limit release of machines with AMD inside.

      Three computer makers were given rebates provided they sourced a set percentage of their chips from Intel. A fourth pledged to source all its laptop chips from Intel in exchange for rebates.

      "Pay to delay" was aimed at stopping a competitor from selling its products to consumers.

      This of course was ten years ago, and things have of course moved on massively since.

      Or have they?

      Go and look at large, well known OEM's that supply PC's to business and let's see how easy it is to get a box with a Ryzen in for business over two years after launch of the Ryzen.

      Dell has a selection box for the Ryzen, which you can tick... however the website then returns only boxes with Intel processors. Surely an error. Which has remained uncorrected for the last two years. (But Dell support, so possibly just their normal response times...)

      HP does thereotically offer Ryzen boxes, although you wouldn't know it from their website, and their ordering system doesn't appear to list them even for their resellers unless you actually have the specific SKU that you want. Even then, I found the order process impressively obstructive. It's actually the first time that I have had a counter offer to supply a different and higher spec (Intel) part discounted to the price of the Ryzen boxes i'd ordered. Nah, coincidence. Surely.

      I can only imagine what'd happen if I was a cloud provider ordering really expensive stuff, but I suspect i'd have inordinate trouble sourcing (thereotically easily available) AMD kit through my usual suppliers.

  2. Boohoo4u

    GPUDirect Storage

    Created for bitcoin mining?

  3. nojobhopes

    FPGA because von Neumann machines are too easy to hack

    Ever since John von Neumann proposed storing data and instructions in the same memory (back in 1945), it has been a recipe for malware. Surely an FPGA can't suffer from buffer overruns? So there's another advantage. Hoping someone with actual knowledge will correct me.

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