back to article Get rekt: Two years in clink for game-busting DDoS brat DerpTrolling

Austin Thompson, aka DerpTrolling, who came to prominence in 2013 by launching Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks against major video game companies, has been sentenced to 27 months in prison by a federal court. Thompson, a resident of Utah, will also have to pay $95,000 to Daybreak Games, which was owned by Sony …

  1. Mr Sceptical
    FAIL

    1 minute of fame

    i.e. the time it takes to read this article, then consigned to the dustbin of idiocy. I've already forgotten his name!

    Worth it now? Derp Derp Derp....

    1. Aristotles slow and dimwitted horse Silver badge

      Re: 1 minute of fame

      And to compound the families woes, his brother Johnny Derp hasn't made a decent movie in years.

      1. LucreLout Silver badge

        Re: 1 minute of fame

        Yeah but he only really got in trouble once Amber Heard.

  2. Alan Bourke

    Oh good.

    The twat.

  3. Elregouk

    Why use a botnet when you just use cloudflare?

  4. Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese Silver badge

    All you need to start with a DDoS is a sizeable botnet

    Alternatively, you need a development workstation connected to the network, some dodgy config and a suitable degree of incompetence when writing a piece of code....

    ...apparently....

    ...or so my friend told me....

    ....<cough><shuffle>

    1. ds6 Bronze badge

      Where are your closing tags?!

      Here </shuffle></cough>

      1. Scroticus Canis
        Headmaster

        Were you looking for one of these - ‽

        Here's a dead one - ⸘

      2. Jimmy2Cows Silver badge

        Re: closing tags

        Well, dodgy config was mentioned...

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      hmmm

      I've just realised , i have an 8000 strong bot net .... although all going through the same IP kinda defeats the object.

      as illustrated when "Information Governance" sent an email to all saying:

      "Hey everyone go to haveibeenpwned.com to if you been hacked"

  5. Scott Pedigo
    Gimp

    Who Will He Deny Service To Now?

    All his base now belong to the inmates.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Who Will He Deny Service To Now?

      Have a downvote for such a cheesy, cliché reference.

  6. DougS Silver badge

    You gotta give him credit

    He chose a very accurate screen name on Twitter!

  7. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

    Arrested in '14. Pleaded guilty late '18, sentenced mid '19.

    Why so long? It's taken longer than his sentence.

    1. Jedit
      Headmaster

      "Why so long? It's taken longer than his sentence."

      It's a situation where you have multiple corporate plaintiffs requesting damages. The long delay before trial was almost certainly to determine who could claim what, and the delay before sentencing would have been the horse trading over the plea bargain.

  8. tfewster Silver badge
    Facepalm

    Hackers v crackers v DDoSers

    ..."hacking" in the classic sense of the term...

    Nope, in the classic sense a hacker is a skilled coder. You're thinking of crackers. Even Wikipedia know that.

    1. Pascal Monett Silver badge

      Re: Hackers v crackers v DDoSers

      Yeah, but that's nerd-level knowledge.

      Today, anyone doing anything nefarious to a computer or network will be called a hacker by the press, and Joe Public will only go along with it.

      1. Prst. V.Jeltz Silver badge

        Re: Hackers v crackers v DDoSers

        these days , according to teenagers , a Hacker is someone who bought a cheat for a game.

        90% of all text broadcast in an online FPS is "noob!" or "hacker!"

        1. Captain Scarlet Silver badge
          Coat

          Re: Hackers v crackers v DDoSers

          These days its "Go play Minecraft", unless you are playing Minecraft.

      2. Prst. V.Jeltz Silver badge

        Re: Hackers v crackers v DDoSers

        anyone doing anything nefarious will be called a hacker by the press..... Correct

        The calling them "crackers" ship has long sailed.

        It was a battle lost sometime early after the milennium. its game over man.

        The original meaning does live on in a small way with people calling their top tips "Life hacks" or "food hacks" etc, this too has opposition from some corners though.

        1. tfewster Silver badge
          Headmaster

          Re: Hackers v crackers v DDoSers

          > The calling them "crackers" ship has long sailed...

          Sure, and I normally wouldn't bother correcting even El Reg for casual usage of "hacker". But I still reserve the right to be pedantic when a technology hack (journalist) claims [casual|common|current]=classic.

        2. Kiwi Silver badge
          Pint

          Re: Hackers v crackers v DDoSers

          It was a battle lost sometime early after the milennium. its game over man.

          I beg to differ.

          I had a 2nd hand Spectrum when I was a kid. The previous owner had emblazoned "NO HACKING" across the top of it, and the Spectrum was the result of his trying to do things with his C64 and modem (nice parents who punish you by giving you a not-as-nice computer vs the ones like mine, where you lost it for a period of weeks to months (except my game watch, never saw that again after the 3rd time I got caught playing with it after 'bedtime').

          This was in '86 or '87, so 'hacking' as a term for illegal computer access (and trying to break into remote systems) was already pretty well established. When I was involved with Fidonet in the late 90's we were also having the "we're not trekkies, we're Trekkers!", sorry I mean "They're not hackers, they're crackers" arguments quite often as well.

          The war was over by '95. Just a few lost soldiers surviving in the jungle who haven't yet been given the news who're still trying to fight.

          (Joe, if you're reading, thanks for the hand-me-down that probably kept me from a life of crime! :) )

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Hackers v crackers v DDoSers

      You're thinking of crackers.

      You do realize that "cracker" is the opposite of the "n-word", right? As in, "He's as white as a (soda) cracker."

      But yes, the old-school term "hacker" has been absconded with in the same manner that "modem" has.

      1. ds6 Bronze badge
        Headmaster

        Re: Hackers v crackers v DDoSers

        You do realize that code crackers existed long before the racist inclinations of that word? And in this context no sane person would ever mistake the intended meaning?

        Unpopular opinion: Only racists bring up race[ in situations it is irrelevant].

        1. RJChurchill

          Re: Hackers v crackers v DDoSers

          A cracker was the white guy cracking the whip to 'motivate' the slaves. You rightly dislike the plantation slave owner, but the guy cracking the whip and enjoying it was truly hated.

          Me thinks the cracker existed long before any code crackers existed.

          Only racists bring up race? Not an unpopular opinion, merely a flawed one.

          1. Julian Bradfield

            Re: Hackers v crackers v DDoSers

            These uses of "cracker" do not seem to be noted in either the OED or Merriam-Webster - they say a "cracker" is A contemptuous name given in southern States of N. America to the ‘poor whites’; whence, familiarly, to the native whites of Georgia and Florida. Quotations claim various etymologies: "a name they have got from being great boasters", or "supposed to have been suggested by their cracking whips over oxen or mules in taking their cotton to the market."

            1. Mike Moyle Silver badge

              Re: Hackers v crackers v DDoSers

              The operative phrase being "...supposed to have been suggested...".

              "Supposed" by whom? "Suggested" by whom? (Hint: If Merriam-Webster, et. al. wanted to sell dictionaries in certain states in certain time periods in the past century-and-a-half, discretion in accepting "suggested" etymologies that were "close enough" -- which would have then been codified in future editions if not challenged -- would have made a lot of sense.)

      2. MrMerrymaker Bronze badge

        Re: Hackers v crackers v DDoSers

        Is this an attempt at humour?

        I have to ask as it's not funny, but certainly not serious... Surely?

        1. Bernard M. Orwell
          Joke

          Re: Hackers v crackers v DDoSers

          Yeah, its a cracker!

  9. John Savard Silver badge

    Not Hacking?

    Since DDoS attacks usually use botnets, they involve hacking; even if the direct victim isn't hacked in the usual sense of the term, other victims are being hacked to make the attack possible.

    The term "hacker" may mean only a skilled coder in some circles. Its original meaning wasn't merely a skilled coder, though, but someone obsessed with understanding the minutiae and internals of the system he worked with. This usually involved some degree of unauthorized access, even if benign, or the acquisition of skills useful to unauthorized access. In some circles, the distinction between "hacker" and "cracker", the latter using such skills deliberately for malicious ends, was indeed maintained - but as far as the general public is concerned (to whom the makers of dictionaries generally defer, rather than purging their lexicographical works of incorrect usages of technical terms) the term "hacker" has indeed come chiefly to mean... what it does.

    1. Ben Tasker Silver badge

      Re: Not Hacking?

      > Since DDoS attacks usually use botnets, they involve hacking; even if the direct victim isn't hacked in the usual sense of the term, other victims are being hacked to make the attack possible.

      Only sort of true.

      *Building* a botnet involves compromising victims, so would fall under the broad term "hacking".

      But, you can *rent* time on a botnet and then trigger a DDoS. No building your own botnet involved. In fact it's big business.

      Would you call someone a systems engineer because they ran wget on AWS? Probably not, because there's a distinction drawn between the platform (AWS/Botnet) and the service being run/launched from it.

      So even given the murky ass background of the term hacker, and the increasing use of rented botnets and booter/stresser services in general, I think it's fair to say that (as a rule) the act of DDoS involves no hacking, though it may be launched from a platform built by it.

  10. Anonymous South African Coward Silver badge

    moral of the story : when doing a DDoS you cannot brag about your exploits, chances are that you will be doxxed by somebody whom you managed to piss off.

  11. Stuart Halliday
    Facepalm

    Hmm I wonder what he did for 4 years between his arrest and pleading guilty...

  12. Prst. V.Jeltz Silver badge

    no ones called him a script kiddie yet?

    what gives - normally the terms overused on people that dont quite fit the description, but here is a real one!

    or is he beneath even that?

  13. Mike Moyle Silver badge

    Gonna have to disagree with the sub-headitor on this one.

    "It’s all lulz until someone goes to prison"

    Hell -- personally, I think that when a yutz like this gets jail time is where the lulz START for most people!

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