back to article VMware now officially supported on Azure. We repeat: VMware now supported on Azure

Microsoft and VMware appear to have buried the hatchet, with the virtualization juggernaut's entire software stack now officially supported on Redmond's Azure. The partnership enables VMware customers to seamlessly move their virtualized workloads between on-premises data centres and Microsoft’s public cloud, without the need …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    How does anyone understand the array of products from VMware?

    I can't be the only one, I really struggle with the bland non descriptive VMware naming conventions that tell you nothing what the product is. It's like a faceless jigaw puzzle of products. And the recommendation here, is to then mix and match 'VMware' products further with other vendors faceless jigsaw puzzle of products?

    How does anyone get the head around the ensuing can of worms produced within a data centre, with all it's complications?

    Maybe, I just have a mental block with VMware naming conventions, or just brow beaten by time, keeping so many workarounds / 'quirks' to making things work, in my head.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: How does anyone understand the array of products from VMware?

      It's not you, it's VMware. Nothing makes sense, they don't even maintain their own nomenclature between products. They might as well start naming their products after animals or types of trees at this point.

      The only exception is the VMware cloud offering on AWS... which is named... VMware Cloud on AWS.

      1. Alan_Peery

        Re: How does anyone understand the array of products from VMware?

        And VMWare Cloud on AWS is really ESXi (with special drivers for networking) where you don't have a lot of the control that make VMWare work well in an enterprise setting....

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: How does anyone understand the array of products from VMware?

          It's also NSX, it's also vSAN, it's also a turnkey service that handles lifecycle, support etc.

          VMware SRE's "Own" everything that's locked down and this is pretty common with managed services (Azure and EC2 don't allow you to much with host BIOS settings!).

          What nerd knobs are you looking for?

  2. Locky
    Headmaster

    Philosophical question of the day

    If you have a Vmware stack in Azure and you put an Oracle DB on it, do you have to licence every CPU in the world?

    1. thondwe

      Re: Philosophical question of the day

      No it'll be a more complex licence than just that!

      (Though Oracle VMs are in Azure Marketplace, so what's the point?)

      1. Giovani Tapini Silver badge

        Re: Philosophical question of the day

        @thondwe The point is that it is a philosophical question.

        It is however an interesting question, as if you have a "mobile" workload i.e. its in a VM package for a reason i.e. pricing, burst capacity etc in favour of a native PaaS as you suggest. The licencing will be problematic. In this case it may be any CPU that has ever existed would be more definable that just any in the world...

    2. DontFeedTheTrolls Silver badge
      Coat

      Re: Philosophical question of the day

      Define CPU, is it cores or chips (packages)?

      And what about the Internet of Things which are part of the C l o u d ? Are they counted in the total even though like many installations they're not useable but still licensable?

      1. Zippy´s Sausage Factory
        Joke

        Re: Philosophical question of the day

        My guess is that Oracle's definition of a CPU is neither a core, nor a chip - at least, most of the time. It's probably some theoretical physical unit dreamt up by the licensing department that is designed to count the most common component to inflate the number to make sure Oracle makes the most licensing revenue per customer possible...

        (Where's the "cynical, moi" icon? Or perhaps there should be an "Oracle user" icon that's just someone with a begging bowl...)

        1. hplasm Silver badge
          Devil

          Re: Philosophical question of the day

          "...It's probably some theoretical physical unit dreamt up by the licensing department that is designed to count the most common component to inflate the number to make sure Oracle makes the most licensing revenue per customer possible..."

          Number of soldered connections in any machines connected in any way with anything that may be near an Oaracle product...

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Philosophical question of the day

      "If you have a Vmware stack in Azure and you put an Oracle DB on it, do you have to licence every CPU in the world?"

      Not until you asked this question....

      I expect a phone call from our Oracle sales rep any minute now.

    4. flipside101

      Re: Philosophical question of the day

      Working on Oracles view that even the potential to run Oracle on it means a licence cost we now be getting close to needing to licence every core that has or will exist

  3. knarf

    Does it run in VM ?

    Asking for a friend

    1. TonyJ Silver badge
      Joke

      Re: Does it run in VM ?

      Yeah I'd like to know that for a friend too...

      Can I install Hyper-v on Vmware in Azure?

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Does it run in VM ?

        Yes ....... probably !!!??? ;) :)

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Does it run in VM ?

        Only if you run the HyperV server in a Docker instance on Linux under KVM.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Does it run in VM ?

          LOL

  4. bazza Silver badge

    Reason to Change?

    Azure makes a lot of money. VMWare want a piece of that.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Reason to Change?

      Both make money.

      The death of the traditional data center just got closer.

      Long live Timesharing!

  5. J. Cook Silver badge
    Alien

    We all know oracle has... creative licensing schemes, but the most headache inducing one is Microsoft's SQL server licensing.

    to run a SQL server in a VM, you'll need to license all the cores on the host. Not sockets, for vCPU, not cores on the vCPU, but all the logical cores that the hypervisor sees. (So, for a 2 socket, 14 core intel CPU with hyperthreading turned on, you'll need to buy 56 cores worth of licensing to run a single SQL server on that host.

    I don't seem to remember if it covers multiple vms with their own SQL engine or not, but I would lean towards the latter. Oh, and if it's SQL enterprise, the cost about triples.

    Almost as bad as running thin clients using View or RemoteApp; 1 machine requires a license for the thin client, 1 for the vm, 1 for the hypervisor (and if it's hyper-V, you'll need a license for that, too!) and a CAL for the RDP seat if you are going the RemoteApp route...

    1. the-triggerer

      HT doesn't necessarily add to the cost and CAL licensing is available to customers with simpler environments,

      Most on-prem users need at least two physical servers (HA) so it makes sense to license four cores and buy SA. Or get CALs if all you have is several internal apps.

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