back to article Amazon boss snubs 'expensive', 'sub-optimal' relational databases. Here's looking at you, Larry

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has used his annual shareholders letter to throw shade at legacy database rivals, saying that while no one asked for AWS, businesses were sick of lock-in and punitive licensing deals. spy As Alexa's secret human army is revealed, we ask: Who else has been listening in on you? READ MORE Tech execs rarely …

  1. Diodelogic

    'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

    Why, no. I wouldn't, I haven't, and I won't.

    1. cbars

      Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

      a replicator would be lovely though

      1. Teiwaz Silver badge

        Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

        I'd settle for a nutrient dispensor, I wouldn't care that all food out of it looked like the square dolly mixtures.

        But no, we instead get black surveilence tubes - useless.

        Come back when you can sell me something other than useless junk designed to increase your profits at my expense.

        1. Ian Michael Gumby Silver badge
          Big Brother

          @Teiwaz Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

          Soylent Green is People!

          Big Brother image because... well... you need to see the movie. A classic that is older than most here.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: @Teiwaz 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

            “Soylent Green is People”

            Was...tense is important

            1. Ian Michael Gumby Silver badge
              Headmaster

              Re: @Teiwaz 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

              Well since its been at least 30 years since I've seen the movie, IIRC the line was "Soylent Green its made from people.... " But I was just trying to be cute and drop the reference.

        2. LucreLout Silver badge

          Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

          But no, we instead get black surveilence tubes - useless.

          I'd really like an Alexa if there could be engineered a way to guarantee my privacy. I'd have to have absolute confidence that the voice recording and transcripts never left the device save for the small fragment of conversation in which I'm specifically talking to the device. It'd just be verbal Google with tunes.

          As to how I could be persuaded that the Alexa had ceased to be a "black surveillance tube" I don't know. At this point it's rather a big hurdle to jump.

          1. joeW

            Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

            Something like this?

            https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/02/18/project_alias/

      2. whitepines Silver badge

        Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

        a replicator would be lovely though

        In the Star Trek, locally controlled version, sure. However I suspect what would happen in real life is that you'd have to pay for a license for access to the copyrighted replicator data files, which would be DRMed to the hilt and every single print would be commercially tracked, centrally controlled, and monitored by the authorities with an automatic kill switch if you want to replicate something nasty. For example a deep fried Mars bar (it's not healthy, doncha know?).

        Yeah, I'll take the days* when I can go to the shops, buy anonymous, generic ingredients, then concoct something tasty and unhealthy if I desire in the privacy of my own kitchen. Sans Alexa of course!

        * And my children will fondly reminisce about them the same way we reminisce about the days when mix tapes were a thing, having a firearm didn't get you executed on a terrorism charge, libraries allowed you to read all kinds of different viewpoints in private, etc.

        1. Teiwaz Silver badge

          Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

          For example a deep fried Mars bar (it's not healthy, doncha know?).

          There was at least one occasion on STNG when Deana tried to order a desert that the computer warned her that what she was trying to order had no nutritional value....

          'as to DRM, there seems little impetus among manufacturers to produce anything lately that doesn't also generate additional revenue via data collection, some form of wasteful and expensive cartridge based design and or subscription based usage. With current corporate trends towards unashamedly milking the customer, I would expect an attempt to milk the customer per usage, which would defeat the point of the device in the first place.

        2. AndyFl

          Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

          It could be worse. Imagine if someone crossed a replicator with Talkie Toaster!

          1. Steve K Silver badge

            Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

            That would be waffle...

      3. Peter Clarke 1
        Alien

        Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

        Not sure I'd want one if it came from the Stargate team, even if I did have plenty of primitive projectile weapons

        1. WolfFan Silver badge

          Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

          ITYM 'plenty of well-deigned, well-built, Belgian projectile weapons'.

      4. WolfFan Silver badge

        Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

        a replicator would be lovely though

        Oh? One of these? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Replicator_(Stargate) Admittedly, I'd like a copy of Replicator Carter, but I'm pretty sure that Amanda Tapping wouldn't go for it.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

      and while Amazon continue to dumb down Alexa, even google has seen the light and stopped repeating some commands back to you now.

      How stupid is it when you ask a device to do something, and you see it do it, and it repeats your command back to you, or tells you where you are when you ask for something else, or displays the camera name on a video feed you have asked it to show, or tells you to have a good afternoon, after giving you the response you ask for?

      Yeah thanks Alexa, but I already KNEW I'd asked you to turn on that light, or show me that camera, you don't need to tell me or show me AGAIN what I asked you to do in the first place!

      1. disgustedoftunbridgewells Silver badge

        Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

        There's a setting for that now. It just beeps back at you to tell you it understood. It also makes the responses shorter ( such as dropping "The time is" from "What time is it" ).

    3. macjules Silver badge

      Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

      When a 'chatbot' can do "Bring me a glass of Margaux please" then I might conceivably buy one. Until then, no chance.

    4. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

      Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

      "I guarantee you they’d have looked at you strangely and said ‘No, thank you’.”

      And some of us will continue to do and say that.

    5. David 132 Silver badge
      Happy

      Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

      As a Star Trek fan, I do have a black, always-on cylinder in my kitchen. Well, to be accurate, it’s positioned in low earth orbit above my kitchen. It’s neat, except that it keeps emitting whale-song noises at interstellar volume and disrupting my electricity supply (not to mention vaporizing my swimming pool).

      1. Andy Non

        Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

        Sounds like you're in for a whale of a time.

    6. cat_mara

      Re: 'Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen...'

      No, but I would like to you to pay your fucking taxes and your warehouse workers a living wage, you slap-headed parasite

  2. swm Bronze badge

    My financial advisor has one of these black cylinders in his office. He doesn't understand my concern. The last time I was there I said, "Alexa, buy me a doll house." The response was, "I've added your request to your wish list." I have no idea whose list this was added to.

    1. whitepines Silver badge
      Joke

      Wouldn't a better request have been "Alexa, buy me 10 boxes of condoms and some Viagra"? Followed of course by "Alexa, what is the best divorce lawyer in my area?"

      That ought to get the cylinder out of his office straight away!

      1. Paul Crawford Silver badge

        "Alexa, order a garden gnome, and tube of KY jelly, and a rubber mallet. Confirm"

        1. Lord Kipper III

          I briefly hovered over the 'report abuse' option but then thought that El Reg is a broad church and perhaps the gnome has an equally broad mind.

          1. Korev Silver badge
            Joke

            I wonder if he runs KDE...

          2. Paul Crawford Silver badge
            Joke

            Well if the Gnome doesn’t have a broad mind to begin with, it sure will have by the end!

        2. Fruit and Nutcase Silver badge

          Alexa, send over some celery, a flying helmet and an egg-whisk to Yvette at Café René

          1. Wenlocke

            Alexa, Listen very carefully, I shall say this only once...

        3. David 132 Silver badge
          Devil

          Gnomes and KY jelly you say?

          https://www.oglaf.com/sphinct/

          (Very, very NSFW, naughty - but laugh-out-loud funny - web comic. Click at your own risk.)

          1. Michael Wojcik Silver badge

            "Foolish hero, didn't you realize the princess was inside you all along?"

    2. Paul Crawford Silver badge
      Gimp

      Last time I was at the local barbers the hairdresser was chatting away and mentioned she had one of these in the bedroom. I just quipped about what it must have heard when her boyfriend was over and she went bright red and the other hairdresser laughed out loud. It had NEVER occurred to her this device could be listening to all sorts of intimate activities.

      No, I have no idea if she did, but what if =>

      1. Korev Silver badge
        Big Brother

        A good mate of mine has a girlfriend called Alexa; I can't see any problems at all here...

        1. Steve Davies 3 Silver badge

          but...

          Is this Alexa a real live human and not some blow-up doll that sits next to the black cylinder as sold to him by Amazon (along with the doll naturally)???

          {the mind boggles for this time on a Monday... Need more coffee}

          Just avoid anything with an Amazon logo (and Google for that matter) on it and eventually the world will be a better place. 1984 is not a sales manual you know.

          Being serious for a moment, I feel really sorry for anyone who is really named Alexa (As in a living breathing human). Amazon has put the blight on that name for the forseeable future.

      2. martinusher Silver badge

        >It had NEVER occurred to her this device could be listening to all sorts of intimate activities

        You can turn the thing off.

  3. Kevin McMurtrie Silver badge

    Scalability buzzwords

    It's easy to use relational databases with infinite scalability for a subset of SQL features. Using a subset of SQL is also a great way to avoid vendor/cloud lock-in for a project that needs to still be maintainable in 15+ years.

    1. Tom 7 Silver badge

      Re: Scalability buzzwords

      It does make you wonder if he has a clue about what he's talking about. I always worry when people say you cant do things I've been doing for decades.

    2. Ian Michael Gumby Silver badge

      @Kevin Re: Scalability buzzwords

      Sorry have to down vote you...

      You bring up a couple of points that aren't actually true or relevant.

      First, RDBMs are used in two different types of applications.

      1) OLTP (Where you have transactions and multiple types of isolation in ACID)

      2) DW (Where you're not locking the data but using a different subset of SQL

      Now OLTP databases are not infinitely scalable, Distributed locks are a pain and get worse the larger and more distributed the data becomes.

      DW... RDBMS top out around 100TB but that could have increased in the past couple of years.

      In terms of vendor lock in... you have your engine and then you have your tool sets. That's where the vendor lock in occurs.

      W.R.T Bezos...He has no clue about what he is blathering on.

      I find it funny that the first comment is less about Bezos and RDBMs and more about Alexa.

      Or the fact that AWS does in fact have a vendor lock in based on both their tools that they are encouraging, along with the high cost of exfiltrating data.

      And yes, I happen to know a lot about both RDBMs and Big Data. Having spent time within Informix , IBM and have been doing Big Data stuff for the past 10 years.

      To your point... Snowflake is making the same argument. Not that I agree with it.

      There's a reason RDBMSs made sense in the past. Unfortunately you can easily lose temporal data unless you're careful.

      1. Charlie Clark Silver badge

        Re: @Kevin Scalability buzzwords

        There's a reason RDBMSs made sense in the past. Unfortunately you can easily lose temporal data unless you're careful.

        RDBMSs still make sense, especially when it comes to transactional integrity, but I think we're in agreement on this. In some situations you may in addition want something different for highly volatile data, such as from logging.

        But Bezos isn't really talking about technology, he's making a sales pitch to non-techies for AWS, because it will magically make all their database problems go away.

        Anecdotally, last week I hit a problem with Amazon presumably due a lack of an integrity constraint in their customer database. I had two accounts with the same e-mail and name, could see both but only ever log into one, which was annoying because I was trying to review an order from another. Pretty much a textbook example of why RDBMSs are good.

      2. fandom Silver badge

        Re: @Kevin Scalability buzzwords

        "IBM and have been doing Big Data stuff for the past 10 years."

        A few years ago my father told me about how the company he worked at the time bought an IBM computer, part of the sales pitch was how they would be able to analyze the data to predict future trends and what not.

        Plot twist: he only worked there until the middle of the seventies.

      3. Kevin McMurtrie Silver badge

        Re: @Kevin Scalability buzzwords

        You might want to check out Google's Spanner. Last time I used PostgreSQL, it supported compare-and-set transactions that benchmarked very well.

        Both of these require some sacrifices to be performant, but they're still quite usable as a transactional relational database.

  4. J J Carter Silver badge
    Trollface

    She’s got a potty mouth

    Alexa, say one hundred in Welsh.

    1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

      Re: She’s got a potty mouth

      Alexa "one hundred in welsh"

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    'Alexa, what is the value of Pii to ten thousand decimal places'

    No idea if it works, everywhere i've been and there's one in the room , it gets unplugged before I utter a word to anyone.

    1. Timmy B Silver badge

      "everywhere i've been and there's one in the room , it gets unplugged before I utter a word to anyone."

      I say that either 1) you're a liar or, 2) nobody wants to talk to you with an attitude like that.

      What on earth conversations do you have that you give one single toss about this? Particularly in the rooms of other people!

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        "What on earth conversations do you have that you give one single toss about this?"

        All of them, whether work or personal.

        When I have conversations, I like to - no, I insist upon knowing who i'm talking with first.

        My various employers would take a less than understanding view if I divulged any of their commercial confidences to an audience they hadn't previously authorised.

        Without exception, on the very few occasions i've had to relieve one of those devices of its connection to a power source, once i've explained why, the subject (I was going to type 'user' but that'd be Amazon etc.) of the device has been fully understanding and supportive, occasionally they have commented that they'd wished they knew it was 'always on' before they had previous conversations with it around....

        Just in the same way as I can still choose to not be monitored by one of these things in my own home or work environment, I can still choose to not be monitored by one of these things in any other private environment.

        1. Timmy B Silver badge
          Big Brother

          Well I hope that when you leave your house you go in disguise and that you've never used any services by google/apple/microsoft/facebook/amazon. Heck I hope you don't have credit cards or store cards of any kind.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Timmy B.

            I do try and minimise my exposure - it's not always possible to avoid the harvesting completely, I do what I can though.

            Google, Facebook, & Twitter have never been used, Microsoft & Amazon are used in moderation, no 'smart' meter or listening / looking devices in the TV, fridge, toaster or kettle, seperate VLAN for visitors devices & CCTV is hardwired to a DVR with no network connection. All data transfer is by DVD-R (not RW)

            No store or 'loyalty' cards, most purchases are in cash, my phones are running LineageOS with no googly services installed. Work stuff is primarily airgapped, some is Company VPN only - the devices cannot be interchanged.

            And i've never picked up a USB stick from the street....

            1. Timmy B Silver badge

              Well that all seems like a huge faff. I hope you don't drive a car. All those ANPR cameras about. It must terrify you to know that they can track all your movements.....

              1. Anonymous Coward
                Anonymous Coward

                Not really, it's an evolved state, not one that was suddenly implemented.

                Yes I do drive a car - well, many cars, owned my many different companies, sometimes more thsan two a day - very rarely do I get to drive my own, whilst ANPR is a non-negotiable fact of life, it recognises vehicles, not drivers, they are identified should the need arise, by contacting the registered keeper of the vehicle.

                You seem to be missing the point that I choose to not be tracked, monitored or 'sold' where there is choice to be had, clearly, things like passports, air travel, council tax etc. are non-negotiable in the level of detail you have to give, if you want, need or have to avail yourself of the service.

                AC - I enjoy parties very much, but they are on a much bigger scale than a few saddoes stood round an Alexa doing some 'Dad dancing' - which i'd hazard a guess is about your level of experience from your comment.

                1. martinusher Silver badge

                  (that was last year's model)

                  >it recognises vehicles, not drivers, they are identified should the need arise, by contacting the registered keeper of the vehicle.

                  Actually, those camera could be set up to not only give a clear picture of the person that's driving (IR works best for that) but also count the number of people and possibly identify any passengers in the car. The original ANPR was for early adopters, it needed license plates that were easily machine readable. Things have moved on a lot; they have no difficulty reading all the permutations of US license plates and getting a picture of the driver (because in the US we can't just issue a ticket to the registered keep of a vehicle, its a Constitution / Bill of Rights thing). The cameras that the Border Patrol uses at their inspection stations look into vehicles.

                  ....and then there's the whole Chinese facial recognition thing......(but its in the UK if you see how quickly a person can be identified from CCTV data when its important to do so).

                  Enjoy your paranoia.....

                2. Timmy B Silver badge

                  "You seem to be missing the point that I choose to not be tracked, monitored or 'sold' where there is choice to be had, clearly, things like passports, air travel, council tax etc. are non-negotiable in the level of detail you have to give, if you want, need or have to avail yourself of the service."

                  No. I understand your point. But it's one of absurd paranoia that's worth of a kind of tongue in cheek mockery. The cognitive dissonance involved in: I chose not to be tracked except when it's unavoidable is just funny. If you're that worried give up and go and live off grid - have no home - use no money - drive no car - use no public transport. But that's a laughable to most people as the attempts you think are laudable.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      You are a hoot at parties I'm guessing

    3. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

      I'm a bit disappointed over the way this thread went. I was hoping it would have been on account of a tendency to do this: https://xkcd.com/1807/

  6. Velv Silver badge
    Headmaster

    have high-lock-in

    A bit like drug dealers, it’s a free upload to get you on board, but have you seen the prices for taking your data out of AWS?

    1. Tom 38 Silver badge

      Data in/out is common for cloud providers. Amazon talking about lock in however... the entirety of AWS (apart from EC2 and S3) is one giant lock in scheme. No you don't have to use their XYZ service for doing whatever feature, but eventually you do, and you end up with a "cloud" solution that only really works with AWS. Sure, you can get it running on GCP or OpenStack, but only once you replace that single click AWS feature with a different feature.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Drug dealers have nothing on Amazon in my experience.

      1. This post has been deleted by its author

  7. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Oracle is worth every penny my competitors spend on it.

  8. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Obvious AC but...

    To quote:

    Other requests include reports on Amazon's gender pay gap, sexual harassment, climate change and the management of food waste generated from the company’s operations. Another proposal suggested executives’ compensation plans should include metrics on diversity in the top management team

    I want to take issue with "gender pay gap" here - this does not mean "equal pay for equal work" - which I am sure only a few loons are (actively) against - I say actively as somehow it's happening.

    I write what follows without condoning or condemning it. It's a statement not a position.

    The problem is that this is *so* fucking hard to measure. If you're lucky a business has a handful of *truly* equal roles - IN THE SAME PLACE - stuff varies hugely from place to place and the more you try to match up "equal jobs" the more strata you create with just one or two people in it.

    It's a nightmare. Once that requires a good few pages to detail and I can dig those out if anyone cares (I'm an actual statistician and I'm like... I've been professionally consulted on measuring this - but by someone fit to choose me to consult? Dunno :P) Although it can be done it requires extremely careful crafting and matching - not an SQL query you can run on a table called employees.

    There are a few measures floating around, The two most popular seem to be "count all the women and men in the work force and see if it's 50/50" (for obvious reasons a number is picked like "for companies with more than 125 to 350 employees" is the suual range)

    This has three major problems:

    1) Some things are dominated one way or the other (think nurses, air-hostesses, mechanics, and plumbers as industry cases, Surveyors are an example of a section of a workforce, Large building firms ect) and are hit fairly hard by the results. For example highway maintenance workers are mostly male and mostly filled positions - fire loads of them and then hire women? But from where there are so few applications! This feedback (for better or worse) leads to slow change, and it's unfair because it's not as if the business can do much about it - to get 50/50 means lots and lots of firing and hiring from a group that just isn't there in applications - so to achieve it you'd have to offer pay incentives and actually create a massive gap (but there's no money for this anyway)

    2) It has fuck all to do with equal pay for equal work.

    3) It doesn't look at representation, only flat 50/50. Suppose we are hiring a new work-force and we can actually get 50% of posts filled from a 30%-by-applications group (and the other half from a 70% group) - this is undoubtedly a good thing to do if that 30% group is "the best applicants" - you want to hire the best! It becomes difficult (ethically) in cases where the groups are equally strong (on average and distribution of skill), put simply anything other than fair representation is ethically dubious and I don't mean "democracy FTW" kinda fair representation I mean think drug trials if 70% of suffers have X and only 30% have Y.... you see where this is going.

    Having said that it could also be viewed as a correction due to the feedback mentioned before. If by getting more Ys in next generation we'd see a 65/35 split then 60/40 split - it may be "ethically okay" - but that's a big discussion that needs to be had.

    This gets much harder when you can't actually get 50% from the smaller group and as you get into more skilled jobs the pool rapidly shrinks, going for a "as-close-to-50/50 split" can create huge biasses (for better or worse) which affects quality of the hire. Assuming same skill distributions if you have a pool of 10 and 50 applicants say and take the best 3 from each the difference in quality is extremely pronounced, these are order statistics and while they converge in the limit (central tendency theorem) this is so far from it the differences are really big. I can post some equations if this is so hard to believe, but if you just need to confirm it get a spreadsheet.

    The other way is:

    take your list of employees group by male and female, and calculate average pay.

    This also has fuck all to do with equal pay for equal work. Classic example: airlines.

    Air-hostesses are paid less than pilots, and out-number them around 5 to 1. I must confess I don't know about the application mix for pilots, but after seeing data from a certain airway that was British and not Ryanair the actual distributions for male/female pilots was "not too bad" - what I saw had no pilot bands (and wasn't public data) - so for example there was no field for "years of experience" or "aircraft type" it was just cursory before the reporting format regulations came in 2 or 3 years ago. I assumed that the internal pilot ID field was an indicator of how long they'd been with this certain airline and used that against pay and while there were some obvious jumps (suggesting paygrades) the differences were very minor.

    I can dig it out if specifics are wanted as I'm commenting off a graph I remember from a few years ago, on work I never finished because the regulations came out. I've also go to go now. But my point in this last bit is that "equal pay for equal work" was very close to present for this airline (it'll never be exactly zero for as long as you have grades and overtime and stuff, if you flip a coin 20 times you wont get exactly 10 heads, same principle, where to draw the line is the point of these tests) with its pilots. However taking it as a whole made it look female dominated by the first metric (workforce count) and male dominated by the second (avg pay) - keep in mind the mentioned caveats about not knowing the application pool for pilots.

    GTG now but you see what I mean. Pilots are one of the easier things to compare for the equal-pay-for-equal-work thing as "flown X from A to B" is a fairly well defined task. I assure you this is rare.

    PS: For whatever reason over-time requests vary between populations and that's time-and-a-half and skews stuff too!

    1. Intractable Potsherd Silver badge

      Re: Obvious AC but...

      Thanks for taking the time to write that quick overview of the difficulties. Whilst all the points you make are (and have been for some time) obvious to me, sometimes the obvious needs pointing out. A point you didn't go in to was the different requirements needed by the two sexes* - rightly or wrongly, women tend to need time off for having children whereas men don't (those men who do take parental tend to work for employers that are sympathetic to it, and their jobs tend not to be in the private sector, and are disproportionately highly paid compared to the average). This means that, for any given period of analysis, more women on the payroll will be receiving maternity pay, which will generally be lower than her actual pay. Then there is the loss of seniority due to taking time off - promotion will be less likely for a period of years. These things skew any analysis of equal pay, and are difficult to correct for.

      *Sex - What your chromosomes and phenotype are; gender - how masculine or feminine or not you feel; sexuality - what sex you are sexually attracted to. I am male, agender, heterosexual, for example.

    2. LucreLout Silver badge

      Re: Obvious AC but...

      I want to take issue with "gender pay gap" here - this does not mean "equal pay for equal work" - which I am sure only a few loons are (actively) against

      There's no such thing as equal work. In 20-30 years of work, I've yet to encounter any individual with the same skill set and experience as I have, which has been causal in a different quality and quantity of work done. As it is those things primarily that define pay, all co-workers have experienced different remuneration too. Why would it be different?

  9. This post has been deleted by its author

    1. fandom Silver badge

      Re: El Reg has never heard complaints of lock-in

      Irony: adj, sort of, like iron

  10. Forum Name 2

    Don't buy Oracle.Their software sucks. And their salesdroids are like dealing with the IRS.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Amazon strikes back

      I can understand where this rant from Bezos came from, I was watching some AWS related videos on YouTube at the weekend when suddenly it started showing video after video of Larry Ellison rubbishing AWS and Amazon generally.

      I guess Bezos is just hitting back.

      Must say Ellison doesn't come across well on video, looked pretty nasty and ruthless (yeah I know they all are but this was in your face nasty)

  11. muhfugen

    Ah yes, tying executive compensation to the racial, sexual and gender makeup of top management. Such an excellent way to prove that you should judge people by the content of their character rather than the color of their skin, and what they stick in where. We are all just the same, and just as capable aren't we? No possible differences in job performance due to those traits right?

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