back to article Public disgrace: 82% of EU govt websites stalked by Google adtech cookies – report

All but three of the European Union member states' government websites are littered with undisclosed adtech trackers from Google and other firms, with many piggy-backing on third-party scripts, according to an analysis of almost 200,000 webpages. The report (PDF), published today by Cookiebot in collaboration with civil rights …

  1. Martijn Otto

    "there were 112 companies slurping up information"

    This sounds like an emergency!

    1. }{amis}{ Silver badge
      Go

      Re: "there were 112 companies slurping up information"

      Nah you're 887 short of an emergency on this side of the pond!

      1. Martijn Otto
        Joke

        Re: "there were 112 companies slurping up information"

        Really? I thought that'd be 01189998819991197141 actually.

        1. Rob
          Joke

          Re: "there were 112 companies slurping up information"

          Wrong number, it's 0118-999-881-999-119-725-3.

          Don't forget the 3 on the end!

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: "there were 112 companies slurping up information"

            7253 minus 112 equals...?

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: "there were 112 companies slurping up information"

        112 is guaranteed to connect you to the emergency services throughout the EU, which includes the UK (and hopefully will continue to include the UK).

        Where a country also has other, local, emergency numbers, these of course continue to work, but the point of 112 is so that we don't have to try to remember different numbers in different countries in the event of an actual emergency, when we might be stressed or panicked.

        112 is also the standard emergency number for GSM mobile phones around the world, and so, hopefully for that reason alone, it will also remain valid for UK landlines, regardless of what might happen over the next few months...

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: "there were 112 companies slurping up information"

      >"there were 112 companies slurping up information" - This sounds like an emergency!

      Thankfully not 118 as that would cost a fortune.

    3. Ian Michael Gumby Silver badge
      Coat

      Re: "there were 112 companies slurping up information"

      How else do you expect the UK Govt. to make up the budget deficits?

      1. Rich 11 Silver badge

        Re: "there were 112 companies slurping up information"

        I assumed it was by selling empty property to the Russians and unclaimed children to the Saudi slave market.

  2. }{amis}{ Silver badge
    FAIL

    Public sector bodies now have the opportunity to lead by example

    The only examples any government IT effort is capable of giving is a tour de force in what NOT to do.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Public sector bodies now have the opportunity to lead by example

      But don't blame the IT engineers, they are managed by knobs most of the time. The amount of times I made suggestions regarding security and the massive flaw an engineer found and was ignored regarding gsuite. When forced to carry on using Outlook due to in house software still requiring it and linking this with G Suite Sync. It was pointed out that this then downloads and UNENCRYPTED copy of all the persons e-mails. All you then have to do, assuming you've managed to get a domain admin password or local admin account, is grab the .OST file and load it into any of the free tools available. You now have free access to that persons gsuite mail. Offline ones obviously but still can make interesting reading.

      Local government IT and I suspect main government IT is normally managed by self serving knobs. Yes men and women cause they just want an easy life until they can either retire or find something else. And they have no issues fucking over their engineers.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Public sector bodies now have the opportunity to lead by example

        "It was pointed out that this then downloads and UNENCRYPTED copy of all the persons e-mails."

        Why?

        G Suite Sync uses POP3/IMAP/SMTP and Google supports SSL transports with all of these options.

        1. Ragarath

          Re: Public sector bodies now have the opportunity to lead by example

          I think he was meaning the OST file is not encrypted.

          If your files on disk are important enough to need encryption then surely you should be using full disk encryption.

          Using the if someone had domain or local admin passwords holds no water. You could say the same regarding any system. For example: if you had the users password to their GSuite accont you could download everything on their GSuite account (emails, docs etc.) un-encrypted!

          1. Roland6 Silver badge

            Re: Public sector bodies now have the opportunity to lead by example

            >If your files on disk are important enough to need encryption then surely you should be using full disk encryption.

            This doesn't actually address the privacy issue raised.

            The issue is that a user's OST/PST file is by default stored unencrypted within their user folders. Hence another user on that system with relevant persmissions to access the fully encrypted disk, will be able to view the contents of the OST/PST folder. The solution to this is to either enable the Windows Encrypting File System (EFS) or force the use (via Group Policy?) of Outlook's built-in encryption.

      2. ecofeco Silver badge

        Re: Public sector bodies now have the opportunity to lead by example

        Not getting the downvotes. Have an upvote from me.

        1. Rich 11 Silver badge

          Re: Public sector bodies now have the opportunity to lead by example

          Not getting the downvotes.

          I think those may be due to the commenter's lazy assumption that all government is wasteful and inefficient, and that no-one at any level of management gives a toss.

          While there are certainly instances you can point to which indicate there are problems, and you can easily fill your day watching the proceedings of the various Parliamentary committees digging away at them, you'll find those instances in any walk of life. Away from headline projects the majority of day-to-day functions tick over smoothly and the majority of people in the Civil Service and in local government do definitely give a toss and take public service seriously, however much the government of the day does it's best to demoralise and demonise them and to outsource their jobs.

      3. Jamie Jones Silver badge
        Headmaster

        Re: Public sector bodies now have the opportunity to lead by example

        Door knobs?

        https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/nob

      4. Alan Brown Silver badge

        Re: Public sector bodies now have the opportunity to lead by example

        "Local government IT and I suspect main government IT is normally managed by self serving knobs. "

        A few quiet words (via a proxy if need be) to the ICO would be in order then.

        Alternatively a few quiet words with a group of lawyers explaining how useful this would be whilst executing a Norwich Pharmaceutical order might have an even more interesting effect.

    2. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

      Re: Public sector bodies now have the opportunity to lead by example

      Leading by example? Like the Police databases illegally containing DNA, fingerprints and photos of unconvicted people because it's "too difficult" to remove them?

  3. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

    I'd like to think that each of these pages were reported to the relevant countries' data protection regulators. Or, for added emphasis, to other countries' regulators.

    1. BebopWeBop Silver badge

      And it might be nice to add a corollary - those reports were acted upon.

      1. AMBxx Silver badge

        those reports were acted upon

        Governments use the ad trackers to track their citizens. They then fine Google for tracking!

        Joined up thinking in action.

  4. codejunky Silver badge

    Oh no

    Ads might become relevant for those of us not using adblockers. At least we have governments to protect us! Ha

    1. RegW

      Re: Oh no

      Hmm. Not seeing the ads is not really the issue.

      Suppose you go to a site to get information about abortion. Using cookies these companies will detect this and add that to your profile. Later your profile may be leaked, leaving you the target of anti-abortionists.

      Suppose that in the future, we do not have such a benevolent government. Perhaps, our reading of The Register at that time will be seen as dangerous, and we all get sent to the gulag.

      My browser tells me that on this page there 2 cookies from doubleclick, 2 from google, and 2 from regmedia, even when the 3 ads are blocked.

      1. codejunky Silver badge

        Re: Oh no

        @RegW

        "Suppose you go to a site to get information about abortion. Using cookies these companies will detect this and add that to your profile. Later your profile may be leaked, leaving you the target of anti-abortionists."

        Ok. So? If my profile is leaked others will too and this is more of a problem with the mob mentality than the useful service of leading people to abortion information and services. This isnt a tracking cookie problem which has dubious success at identifying someone but an education problem that mobs of idiots are useful for a cause.

        "Suppose that in the future, we do not have such a benevolent government. Perhaps, our reading of The Register at that time will be seen as dangerous, and we all get sent to the gulag."

        That is possible. And a tracking cookie is not likely to be enough to be certain so in such a dystopia possibly USSR/N.Korea/Communist China scenario we would have other things to worry about by that point.

        "My browser tells me that on this page there 2 cookies from doubleclick, 2 from google, and 2 from regmedia, even when the 3 ads are blocked."

        Ok. But you can still access what you want and maybe, just maybe at some point in the future you might get adverts relevant to you. Its flaky enough not to achieve it well yet but imagine actually getting relevant results for things your looking for.

        These people are trying to make the web somewhat useful (and might fail at their efforts). We already have governments trying to make the web less useful. I know this cookie thing seems to bother some people, and I am not arguing against them, its just that I dont care. I dont have a problem with it.

        1. RegW

          Re: Oh no

          I'm not sure I follow your argument.

          Yes, it is your prerogative as an informed individual to not care which private details are collected about you and who they are shared with. But this is the reason why others might feel alarm.

          And yes, cookies do make the web more useful. Although the role of governments in this story is that the outside organisation mentioned above, has found some government websites are riddled with cookies unrelated to their function. Making the web less useful by incompetently coding their own sites seems unlikely - but I could be wrong.

          However, the bit I don't get is: why is your use of an ad blocker relevant? Especially as you seem to imply that ad tracking cookies make the web better.

          1. codejunky Silver badge

            Re: Oh no

            @RegW

            "And yes, cookies do make the web more useful. Although the role of governments in this story is that the outside organisation mentioned above, has found some government websites are riddled with cookies unrelated to their function"

            But this is where I dont follow the argument. So what?

            "However, the bit I don't get is: why is your use of an ad blocker relevant? Especially as you seem to imply that ad tracking cookies make the web better."

            Basically the point of this tracking is for better advertising. Of course I block ads since what I get shown is only a little more relevant that the rubbish on TV between the show I want to watch. But so far the worst I hear is some hypothetical but never seemingly substantiated idea of profiling by men in the shadows. Funnily those men are the governments efforts already with more blunt methods.

          2. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Oh no

            "codejunky" is a determined brexit supporter.

            No-one can follow his arguments.

  5. Charlie Clark Silver badge

    The report authors said this was of "special concern" because Google can cross-reference trackers with its first-party account details via its widely used consumer services such as Mail, Search and Android apps.

    Yes, they might. But to do so would be a flagrant breach of GDPR and would come with a hefty fine or even a ban. Years ago Google refused not to do this but has since become willing to be contractually bound not to do so, though this might cost cash! It even provides the relevant Javascript to anonymise the last octet of an ip address. So, in these cases it's clearly the commissioning departments, or more likely the agencies that are at fault. And further evidence that every citizen should use an ad blocker.

  6. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Across the pond

    in the US my script blocker (uMatrix) lights up like a Christmas tree showing trackers for Facebook, Yahoo and others when I log into my bank used mainly by active duty and retired military members.

    uMatrix also alerted me to the fact that there was several hidden tracking pixels for Facebook, Linkedin and more when paying rent over a well known payment system used by apartments across the nation.

    At least in the UK you have GDPR.

    1. Gene Cash Silver badge

      Re: Across the pond

      > trackers ... when I log into my bank

      When I log into Chase, I get cookies and scripts from .ru and .cn - they're disallowed/adblocked but it still annoys me as ALL the banks suck, so there's not a real alternative.

      1. Stoneshop Silver badge
        Headmaster

        Re: Across the pond

        Gene Cash : ALL the banks suck

        Eponysterical

        1. BebopWeBop Silver badge
          Thumb Up

          Re: Across the pond

          Ahh a new word to brighten my day

      2. Charlie Clark Silver badge

        Re: Across the pond

        Most online banking is just an accident waiting to happen.

        I only do online banking via HBCI and a dedicated application. Avoids all the trackers and, in case of fraud, the onus is on the bank to demonstrate that the owner was careless.

      3. Michael Wojcik Silver badge

        Re: Across the pond

        Banks suck, yes. Some credit unions are quite good. Mine is a large one that offers all the retail-banking services that a bank would, at lower cost.

      4. Alan Brown Silver badge

        Re: Across the pond

        > When I log into Chase, I get cookies and scripts from .ru and .cn

        In the USA there may not be _federal_ privacy legislation, but a significant number of the states have privacy legislation that is almost as good as GDPR and has long-arm statutes. Everyone focusses on California because of its population and misses the others with even tougher laws.

        If you live in one of those states it's worth notifying the local privacy commissioner

  7. Chris G Silver badge

    Has anyone done a feasibility and benefits study on nuking Gargle, Faecebook et al from space?

    If someone fancies doing a crowdfunded start-up of Nukes for Privacy, I'm in with a couple of quid.

    1. Tomato42 Silver badge

      impossible

      far too many sites use ajax.googleapis.com and require them to even render any text content

      1. Adrian 4 Silver badge

        Only until they stop working,

        And would anything of value be lost ?

    2. Zolko

      Has anyone done a feasibility and benefits study on nuking Gargle, Faecebook et al from space?

      I use several browsers: my main browser blocks everything I can (NoScript, Ghostery, AdNauseam, Qwant...) and I have other browsers that are very permissive but that I use only for special purposes: Opera, Konqerror, and I even have Chrome to do Google-Maps and Google-Conference. But only Google, and no Gmail ever.

  8. ratfox Silver badge
    Paris Hilton

    So they will be fined under the GDPR, right?

    ...Right?

  9. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Yup, seems about right

    I work in local government IT and this stuff comes from the propaganda communication team; - "we've commissioned a 3rd party marketing agency for a campaign to stop teenagers sniffing pokemon and they want to add this tag to the site - it doesn't add any cookies it just 'drops a beacon' or 'tags a pixel' so that's OK isn't it? can you just insert this script into the website"

    1. JohnFen Silver badge

      Re: Yup, seems about right

      "it doesn't add any cookies it just 'drops a beacon' or 'tags a pixel' so that's OK isn't it?"

      Trust marketing to fail to understand that beacons and JS are worse than cookies.

    2. Alan Brown Silver badge

      Re: Yup, seems about right

      > it just 'drops a beacon' or 'tags a pixel' so that's OK isn't it?

      Sure. I'll add it - As soon as you run it past legal and the ICO to get written authorisation. GDPR and all that, y'know.

  10. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    GDPR is a cookie own-goal

    With the introduction of GDPR last year, users who choose not accept cookies find themselves subject to an incessant tirade of NAGs: "We value your privacy, so please accept cookies or we will hide your current window until you do, or find the obscure way to disable the nags."

    The aims of GDPR are laudable but the marketing fraternity have cynically turned the tables on privacy and made simple anti-tracking measures (e.g. disable cookies) unworkable for most users.

    1. A.P. Veening

      Re: GDPR is a cookie own-goal

      Those cookie walls have been deemed illegal by the relevant authority here in the Netherlands (ACM) and I expect the same to happen pretty soon in most of the EU and the EEA. The obvious exception will be the UK thanks to Brexit, but that is their problem.

      1. Version 1.0 Silver badge

        Re: GDPR is a cookie own-goal

        I like cookie walls - essentially it's a nice big "GO AWAY" sign when you visit the site.

        1. Michael Wojcik Silver badge

          Re: GDPR is a cookie own-goal

          I like cookie walls

          Mmm, cookies.

          (I was going to link to a clip of Dawn saying that in the BtVS episode "Flooded", but mysteriously I was unable to find one on YouTube. The fans have let me down.)

    2. The Central Scrutinizer

      Re: GDPR is a cookie own-goal

      I hate those stupid popup/half screen messages that basically prevent you from actually using the site. "We value your privacy blabla". Bollocks, no you don't. All you're doing is complying with a stupid directive and driving traffic AWAY from your site.

      1. Tomato42 Silver badge
        Stop

        Re: GDPR is a cookie own-goal

        the directive is not stupid, it's their implementation of it that is stupid, and actually not in compliance

        the GDPR is clear: the user needs to be able to reject tracking, the tracking must be opt-in, and unless it's necessary to providing the service, rejection of it must not cause the service access to be denied

        but of course the markedroids need the graphs to masturbate over so they are trying out how far they can push and get away with

      2. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

        Re: GDPR is a cookie own-goal

        ""We value your privacy blabla". Bollocks, no you don't.

        Of course they value your privacy. They value it at the level of access (or not) they will give to their site if you don't pay them with your valuable privacy. This is why they use the word "value" instead of "respect".

    3. eldakka Silver badge

      Re: GDPR is a cookie own-goal

      GDPR is a cookie own-goal

      I don't agree. It's more like those sites have overtly exposed themselves to Darwinism. That is, when I find sites that do this, I block the site entirely, as it is not a site I wish to visit. The site doing this is doing me a service by making it blatantly obvious that it is a shite site I want nothing to do with. If enough people follow suit, the site will either change its practices, or shut down.

  11. ThatOne Silver badge
    Devil

    > the governments supposedly fighting the good fight against excess stalking of netizens

    Sorry? Government are fond of surveillance. They love being able to keep tabs on those unruly great unwashed, so don't expect too much enthusiasm.

    .

    > it has been stuck in discussions between member states for more than a year, and privacy activists fear it is being watered down

    Of course it is. A tool is a tool, and who will complain if adtech spends money developing it, if you can afterwards use it as you please for weeding out people you don't like, like political adversaries terrorists and perverts.

  12. Cincinnataroo

    I take this as proof that those who legislate should not try to control the situation. They, and those associated with them, tend not to have much clue, they only make things worse. For those, who are concerned enough to act, I see their their jobs as letting us do our own filtering, to eliminate the unwanted surveillance.

    Me I want to tell sites (in the request) what surveillance I will or won't accept so they can just do it without annoying me. In the process I want to know what surveillance they would otherwise try, that way I'm able to switch them off, in my DNS, even if they do the right thing when asked.

    It's not hard, it's not rocket science, it's all doable. DNT failed because there are too many scum, if something like that were legislated it would do a better job.

    Would help avoid things like:

    1. Those dumb cookie warning idiocies.

    2. GDPR legislation that has made surveillance arguably worse by strengthening the hands of Google and Facebook.

    3. Things like all these clueless government web sites would be more of a non-issue, if you could skewer the surveillance.

    4. If you look at the medical government web sites, they may be auctioning off selected searches, different in each country. This would stop that, for those who took the time AND show visitors which ones are corrupt.

    1. jmch Silver badge

      One of the issues is that is so difficult nowadays to keep systems safe and private. Just off the top of my head - antivirus / antimalware, ad blocker, 'privacy' browser and search engine, secure email, VPN...

      It's a lot to keep on top of even for an IT pro let alone for a layperson. And many of the vendors I've tried have multiple seperate products that they keep trying to cross-sell / push on you and / or highlight 'threats' that can be solved by said product upgrades.

      I currently use a combination of Proton Mail / VPN, Brave (on mobile) and Firefox + Adblock (desktop), Duckduckgo search and malwarebytes... I wish there were a cleaner / simpler combination of effective tools. Suggestions?

      1. A.P. Veening

        Re: Suggestions?

        How about a Pi-Hole? If you run it on a Raspberry Pi, it can do the ad blocking for all internet equipped stuff in your home.

  13. N2 Silver badge

    Barstweards

    The lot of them,

    Hosts file, NoScript, Ad Block and Ghostery generally does the trick

    Then cookie autodelete flushes the shite thats left

    1. Rudolph Hucker the Third

      Re: Barstweards

      +1

      Plus PiHole to protect everything else.

      Talking of which, please can someone provide some sample URLs for these offending gov websites?

      So we can see what gets blocked by the combination of NoScript, Ad Block, Ghostery and PiHole.

      Or not as the case may be. :-)

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Barstweards

      Ghostery ?

      Haha, I wouldn't touch that with a barge pole.

      1. 10forcash Bronze badge

        Re: Barstweards

        I've had increasing concerns over Ghostery over the last few months - since it started 'asking' me to get the paid-for version, i've nuked it from a low orbit on several devices.

        I do find that the paid-for AdGuard works well on mobile devices though, despite being UK based, I bought heavily discounted licences from an American site - makeuseof.com. There is some duplication of filters with uBlock Origin though, removing some of the larger lists in uBlock speeds up the first page load time no end!

  14. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    The four great lies.

    The cheque is in the post.

    I will still love you in the morning

    I won't come in your mouth

    Cookies are essential for the correct operation of this site.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: The four great lies - plus one

      "JavaScript is essential for the correct operation of this static page site"

      That of course supposes you even get this message. Some sites present a blank page if scripting is turned off, but many just fail to respond to clicks on apparent links and buttons.

      We should loudly point out to those enamoured of JS that it's for years been the primary vector for data breaches triggered via the browser and for illict trawling and snooping.

      1. Nick Ryan Silver badge

        Re: The four great lies - plus one

        We should loudly point out to those enamoured of JS that it's for years been the primary vector for data breaches triggered via the browser and for illict trawling and snooping.

        Also that JavaScript should be used to enhance a website and not to pointlessly recreate standard HTML+CSS and then wonder why everything goes to shit across different browsers, spectacularly fails legal accessibility requirements and has appalling SEO. All this is easily fixable by employing competent developers who know the difference between browsers and desktop applications, understand that there are many (better) ways than "the microsoft way" and that following every fad JS library is not a good idea. Unfortunately 99% of developers that I now see have no concept that a web application is different to a desktop application and are unable to understand the value in simplicity rather than recreating standard interfaces, badly, in JavaScript.

        /rant

    2. Kane Silver badge

      Re: The four great lies.

      "The cheque is in the post.

      I will still love you in the morning

      I won't come in your mouth

      Cookies are essential for the correct operation of this site."

      You forgot "Just the tip".

      1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge
        Facepalm

        Re: The four great lies.

        and...

        "Only a small number of users were affected"

        "Data security is our number one priority"

        "Lessons have been/will be learned"

    3. notamole

      Re: The four great lies.

      Sadly, the adblockers and firewalls don't let you whitelist individual cookies/scripts. So if you need to log into an account on Amazon for example, you need to let in all their other junk as well.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Logging into Amazon

        I have a Linux VM for that which gets deleted and restored from a read-only copy once used.

        It also uses a VPN for all outbound traffic. Amazon for some strange reason seem to think that my system is in [somewhere a long way from where I really am located]

        Obviously that all changes when I log in but there is nothing there for their bots to hoover up when I do decide to buy some [redacted] [redcated] from their mega tat store.

        Using amazon like going into Currys/{whatever they are called this week} is a last resort for me these days.

        Posting AC naturally.

  15. LDS Silver badge
    Devil

    "tracking on these sites is even more alarming [...] because they don't rely on ad revenue"

    Well, that's not true in the Irish case....

  16. EBG

    shits

    Beyond words. Beyond contempt.

    I've thought for some time that the final link in the chain that enslaves us will be our private-commercial digital self being linked to our official digial selves which we are forced to maintain by the state (via tax etc.). Corporate bizgov will be our feudal overlords.

  17. steviebuk Silver badge

    Local papers

    Someone with some web coding should look at the local papers. The amount of shit cookies and tracking they have is insane.

    1. sabroni Silver badge
      Facepalm

      Re: Local papers

      Yeah, that's way more important than government web sites!

    2. Nick Ryan Silver badge

      Re: Local papers

      I don't bother with links to the local papers now... they are 99% advertising, full of all the usual pseudo-article lies (X in your ares found this in their basement, and so on), utterly intrusive and then started relying on JS overlays for intrusive gateways to access the poor quality, if vaguely relevant, content.

  18. Daedalus Silver badge

    Internet shock horror sensation!!!

    Seriously people, anybody who runs a script blocker can see this things popping up everywhere. Your outsourced company pay and benefits website: found. Your outsourced time logging site: found. Your outsourced IT ticket site: found (and being used to generate pretty graphics that do nothing to improve the service). Your outsourced job-training and personal development site: found (useless graphics come with the territory there. No use complaining).

    Google might as well have two seats on the board of every company in the US.

  19. Robert Helpmann?? Silver badge
    Joke

    A Simple Solution

    Rather than go through all the effort of governments setting up their own web sites and still committing gaffes of this nature, why not cut to the chase and outsource their web hosting to Facebook?

    Please pay attention to the icon, just this once!

    1. A.P. Veening

      Re: A Simple Solution

      I am afraid several governments don't get it and will follow your recommendation.

  20. Saul Dobney

    Is location and IP tracking being used instead?

    The past 12 months, we've seen a big increase of tracking and targeting by IP address instead of browser. So in a multi-device, multi-person household you get targeting 'leaking' between the devices, some of which are locked down and some which are generally open to being tracked. For instance if my daughter browses for jewellery that then seems to result in ads and recommendations appearing on other devices in feeds and suggestions. It also seems there might be some leakage from neighbours - things they are interested in that we're not - based on location.

    The risk is that if Google or other tracking company monitors say visits to family planning sites, or health advice sites, or unemployment advice, the system could easily leak this information inadvertently to family or neighbours simplying by displaying the wrong ad to the wrong person.

  21. Potemkine! Silver badge

    Interesting remark from the report not mentioned in the article: "These results do not include trackers associated with the Google Analytics platform" . I thought at first these cookies could account for a large number of the detected trackers, but not even!

  22. LiMaNo

    https://www.avanite.com/blog/cookie-management-shouldn-t-the-government-be-setting-an-example

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