back to article Following 'stellar' flat sales growth, operating profit dip, Oracle says it has 1,000 Autonomous Database customers

Oracle on Thursday reported revenues of $9.6bn for fiscal Q3 2019 – which is about what analysts anticipated and prompted the stock to bounce up and down indecisively in after-hours trading. For those three months to February 28, GAAP EPS increased to $0.76, or $0.87 non-GAAP, which is up eight per cent from $0.80 non-GAAP in …

  1. a_yank_lurker Silver badge

    Show me the beef

    If you are going to say the cloud is where the action is break it out as a line item. Being hidden means it is very difficult to check the numbers and Larry and his Minions do not win awards for trustworthiness. So my question, parallel Buffett's, is what are they hiding?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Show me the beef

      So can you show me where Microsoft breaks out its Azure revenues as a line item or even AWS IaaS or PaaS as a line item, or maybe even IBM. Bottom line is no one is reporting Cloud only revenues as a line item on their financial reports so why should Oracle. All of Oracles cloud competitors have been cloud washing their cloud *only* financials.

      1. boboM

        Re: Show me the beef

        Micro$oft are doing that for exactly the same reason; to hide that it is bleeding money.

        Note they only talk about market share or revenue growth; never margin or profit.

  2. Milton Silver badge

    Hidden beef

    "... what are they hiding?"

    Fair question, since no one with a scrap of intelligence would trust Oracle or its minions. I suspect the answer is another question: Why would any rational customer, having evaluated all cloud options available to them, and considering all parameters of cost, functionality and security, choose to buy Oracle? Seriously—for what possible reason would you actually choose Oracle?

    For a very long time now, it has seemed to me that "new" Oracle business comes mostly from existing victi- customers, who simply cannot escape. Oracle has added a plethora of variously half-decent or crummy systems to its core offerings, usually poorly integrated and clunkily Frankensteined together, to the point where the one thing it was doing well 25 years ago (its RDBMS) is obscured behind a barnacly encrustation of pie charts and marketing nonsense that only a third-rate MBA could love. It's not so much an ecosystem as a swamp—where the only dry areas are dotted with punji pits. I defy any rational business not already parasitised by Oracle to choose to go there. And let's face it, if the unappetising, inflexible mess of its offerings were not sufficient deterrent, its corporate attitude of arrogance and entitlement, coupled with traditionally unsavoury marketing, sales and pricing practice would surely send you fleeing?

    My guess is that it takes a lot of smoke and mirrors to obscure the fact that Oracle survives, for now, by squeezing existing customers and sucking them into more pasted-on crap; that a forensic examination would show how very, very little genuinely new business, in the shape of actual new clients, is coming through the door.

    Of course, it is fortunate for companies like Oracle and its saleslizards that a veritable multitude of third-rate MBAs are constantly spaffed out of colleges like wasps on a hot summer morning—eager, and entirely clueless.

    1. FozzyBear Silver badge
      IT Angle

      Re: Hidden beef

      That has to be one of the scariest summaries of the, once, tech giant I've read in some time

      Sadly, it is one of the most accurate descriptions I've read in some time

    2. Down not across Silver badge

      Re: Hidden beef

      Why would any rational customer, having evaluated all cloud options available to them, and considering all parameters of cost, functionality and security, choose to buy Oracle? Seriously—for what possible reason would you actually choose Oracle?

      As you later on hinted at, the only reason would be someone already locked-in in Oracle products wanting to get out of managing datacentres/hardware. If, for example, you need to continue to run the RDBMS, Oracle's own cloud offering is likely to be better value for money than for example AWS especially after Larry hiked up licensing costs in AWS.

      Anyone other situation, in my most humble opinion, it would be utter madness to consider Larry's offering,

  3. Z80Zilog

    Ive used sql server for over 15 hears, it just works and everything is easy to understand and can be controllef using management studio.

    ive also had some experience with oracle dbs, the tools they provide are just plain confusing, and each tool seems to have totally different user interface.

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