back to article On the eve of Patch Tuesday, Microsoft confirms Windows 10 can automatically remove borked updates

Microsoft has quietly updated a support document to let us know that Windows 10 will have a crack at uninstalling borked updates – just in time for patch Tuesday. Windows 10 endures enjoys a near constant stream of updates and patches to, as Microsoft put it, "keep your device secure and running at peak efficiency". This is …

  1. Craig 2

    Cue stories of the automatic reboot fixer putting devices into an endless loop so they'll need a update-fixer-fixer and so on.... Spaghetti code extreme!

    1. Version 1.0 Silver badge

      I think it does that now - we have one W10 laptop that reboots when it feels like it for a day or two. Will MS eventually extend this new feature to remove problem applications like Libre Office?

      1. msknight Silver badge

        I always did wonder why the malicious software removal tool, doesn't remove Windows.

        1. CrazyOldCatMan Silver badge
          Joke

          I always did wonder why the malicious software removal tool, doesn't remove Windows

          They missed some words out of the tool name "Someone elses Malicious Software removal tool" is the correct title.

          Soon to be updated to remove any software that directly competes with Microsoft software..

        2. revenant Bronze badge

          re MSRT

          My favourite MSRT is linuxmint-18.3-cinnamon-64bit.iso.

          1. phuzz Silver badge

            Re: re MSRT

            Mint 19.1 is out now.

            1. revenant Bronze badge

              Re: re MSRT

              True, 19.1 is out, but I'll stick with 18.3 for now - it still has two years of support left.

            2. revenant Bronze badge

              Re: re MSRT

              Additional. OK I was a bit biased against Mint 19.1 because of its piss-poor performance in a Virtual Machine. Your post prompted me to go one step further on a Dual-Core Toshiba Satellite laptop and upgrade from 18.3 to 19.1.

              I had no problems doing it and I find that the resulting performance is quite acceptable. I'll still stick with 18.3 on the others for now, but at least I know I can move up should the need arise.

          2. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: re MSRT

            Me too, Linux is the only update that works for me.

      2. WonkoTheSane
        Headmaster

        "Will MS eventually extend this new feature to remove problem applications like Libre Office?"

        LibreOffice is only a problem for MS, because users don't have to pay for it.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          LibreOffice

          LO has become a very buggy piece of software. Unfortunately OO has fallen by the wayside, but at least it's more stable / more bug free. German Softmaker Free looks to be a good alternative at the moment.

          1. bombastic bob Silver badge
            Meh

            Re: LibreOffice

            well last I checked Libre Office didn't CRAM forced updates at you, either. I typically just install whatever I downloaded before and to hell with feature creep.

            Unless there's some compelling reason to get a "bleeding edge" version, you can go with a "known good" release if you have trouble. Last I checked they're keeping old install images around [unless that changed for some reason]. And worst case you can try www.archive.org to get an older image

            unfortunately, NOT an option for Win-10-nic itself...

          2. Mycho Silver badge

            Re: LibreOffice

            Libreoffice exists precisely because OO fell by the wayside.

          3. MonkeyControl

            Re: LibreOffice

            Using the word 'buggy', or the phrase 'fallen by the wayside', to describe either LO or OO next to anything microsoft has to offer seems a bit harsh. Plus you mention the word 'free'.

      3. Kobus Botes
        Big Brother

        Will MS ...extend this new feature to remove problem applications like Libre Office?

        @Version 1.0

        Windows 10 has had that ability right from the start and that was one of my concerns with the technology (not to imply that MS are planning/want to do it); it becomes all too easy to abuse ("accidentally" remove LO or any other (undesirable by MS) program?) whilst having plausible deniability.

        See https://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/all/2016/05/17/microsoft_windows_7_and_81_fixes_now_rollup_bundles/#c_2868324 and https://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/all/2016/05/02/desktop_os_market_share_april_2016/#c_2853826 in this regard.

        1. bombastic bob Silver badge
          Meh

          Re: Will MS ...extend this new feature to remove problem applications like Libre Office?

          I always keep downloaded install images in a safe place NOT that's writeable by a windows OS. So it'd be a pain to re-install, but CERTAINLY I wouldn't put it past M-shaft at some point to even CONSIDER this (we had to remove "XXX" because of "update install problem") even if it's M-shaft's fault to begin with...

          However, with so many people scrutinizing their update process [due to last year's total pooch-screw updates], I doubt they'd get away with it.

    2. bombastic bob Silver badge
      Devil

      I wouldn't call update-fixer-fixer 'spaghetti' code [that's usually reserved for the kind of code that twists and turns so that nobody that's trying to work on it can follow it, not even the creator]. A better term might be a 4 letter word for excrement...

      1. bombastic bob Silver badge
        Devil

        heh a downvote - not sure why you'd downvote THIS particular pithy wisdom, but in case you were wondering...

        from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaghetti_code

        In a 1980 publication by the United States National Bureau of Standards, the phrase spaghetti program was used to describe older programs having "fragmented and scattered files"

        In the 1978 book A primer on disciplined programming using PL/I, PL/CS, and PL/CT, Richard Conway used the term to describe types of programs that "have the same clean logical structure as a plate of spaghetti"

        So, like THAT. Then again, a downvote probably came from a member of my "fan club" and was probably directed at me personally, and not at the content

        *kisses* heh heh heh

        1. Jamie Jones Silver badge

          First rule of El Reg comments:

          Never mention your downvotes!

          [ p.s.Your probably put me into your "fan club", but I actually upvoted you ]

      2. RyokuMas Silver badge
        FAIL

        But surely, the original code was designed, written and tested by developers who were safe in the knowledge that they would NEVER! HAVE! TO! TEST! IT! AGAIN!!!... right?

      3. A.P. Veening

        Better term

        "A better term might be a 4 letter word for excrement..."

        I would prefer an eight letter word with as definition: "The end product of an adult, uncastrated, male head of cattle, aka rose fertilizer".

  2. teknopaul Bronze badge

    flight mode

    Airline authorities should insist devices have a *shutdown now* option without installation delays during takeoff.

    Then we can use that option for a few weeks untill the public has tested Microsofts code for them.

    1. Updraft102 Silver badge

      Re: flight mode

      Hibernate works for that. Not that the OS should ever commandeer the shutdown option, of course!

      1. DailyLlama

        Re: flight mode

        Hibernate is terribly bad for SSDs; it shouldn't even be part of the OS anymore, imho.

        1. sqlrob

          Re: flight mode

          Is that true on a modern SSD? I didn't think the write limits were anywhere near what they were before.

          And how does this differ from the swapfile?

          1. mr_souter_Working

            Re: flight mode

            when you install windows (and, other OS's) on an SSD, it disables the pagefile/swapfile - among other SSD specific tweaks

            1. Sandtitz Silver badge
              FAIL

              Re: flight mode

              "when you install windows (and, other OS's) on an SSD, it disables the pagefile/swapfile - among other SSD specific tweaks"

              You're wrong.

              Win10 doesn't disable pagefile or the hibernation file upon installation on an SSD. Windows just enables TRIM when the system has an SSD and that's it really.

          2. BinkyTheMagicPaperclip Silver badge

            Re: flight mode

            It's true if you're doing a lot of hibernating each day. If you look at the 250GB Crucial MX500, it has a 5 year warranty, and a limit of 100TB written (TBW), equating to 54GB a day.

            For a badly mismatched laptop with a lot of memory, a small SSD, and a lot of travel this could be an issue if the laptop is kept for years (although SSDs commonly considerably exceed their TBW).

            The windows hibernation file is compressed so the storage impact normally isn't a worst case scenario. I suppose you could also be much more clever and not store bits of memory loaded unaltered from files, but that would most probably involve a large effort for little payback.

            For most people hibernation is not going to be an issue.

            1. Updraft102 Silver badge

              Re: flight mode

              That would just mean the warranty ends sooner. That's what the TBW rating is primarily used for, as you hint at with the reference to the length of the warranty period for the drive in question. The actual hardware endurance is much higher than this, as you also noted. This contradicts the statement that "hibernate is very bad for SSDs." More accurately, it would be that "hibernate may somewhat shorten warranties on some SSDs."

              Most people who travel a lot still don't do it every single day, so even if the 54GB allotment per day is exceeded on any given day, it probably won't average out to more than that over weeks, months, and years. Five years is a long time for a frequently used and travelled-with laptop to be in service... travel is rough on gear, and a standard 2.5" laptop HDD is probably about ready to give it up at five years even on a laptop that just sits on a desk most of the time.

              that "hibernate should just be removed" thing really annoys me. On every Ubuntu, Mint, Neon, etc., installation these days, the first thing I have to do is re-enable it. They disabled it supposedly because it is too buggy, but for me it has always worked fine once I get it set up, and that's across a pretty wide variety of hardware. Just because one person dislikes a feature doesn't mean that it should just be removed! Don't use it if you don't like it, but also allow me to make the choice that fits me like you made the choice that fits you.

              If everyone who used a given product got to specify one disliked feature to be removed, it would end up without any features at all. There's no doubt that someone out there hates your favorite features on something!

              That's why I favor lots of configurability and options in software, in defiance of the trendy minimalism that has infected everything these days. Not everyone loves a minimalist piece, and even of those that do prefer a minimal interface, the odds are they wanted a different set of minimal options than the ones you would have chosen.

              Offering a lot of options increases complexity that might confuse some people, but that's a necessary evil, I think, and a less objectionable one than trying to dumb everything down to the level that a complete neophyte can understand and declaring that to be optimal. We need more options, not less!

        2. bombastic bob Silver badge
          Unhappy

          Re: flight mode

          "it shouldn't even be part of the OS anymore"

          yeah well don't tell M-shaft that, they might RIP OUT YET ANOTHER USEFUL FEATURE because one or two people *FEEL* it shouldn't be there... [already done WAY too many times to Win-10-nic]

        3. paulll Bronze badge

          Re: flight mode

          "Hibernate is terribly bad for SSDs; it shouldn't even be part of the OS anymore, imho."

          Or how about I use it and you just don't?

        4. Jakester

          Re: flight mode - Hibernate is terribyle bad for SSDs....

          I have always considered hibernate as terribly bad. Sleep mode isn't any better.

          I have found that whenver Windows goes to sleep or hibernate, any files that are 'Locked open' on a server or shared resource can be put into an unstable stat when the server thinks the sleeping/hibernating computer is turned-off.

          Worse, manufacturers don't know how to implement sleep properly. I have a laptop and a tablet (different manuracturers), that do not wake up an SD card when the rest of the computer awakes. The only way to wake up the SD card is rebooting the device. I doubt the issue is caused by Microsoft Windows as I then installed Linux and had the same behavior. I had to bypass the automatic sleep switch in the laptop to fix the issue. Even setting the laptop to not go to sleep didn't help because the firmware would shut-off the SD card when the lid was closed, even though the operating system didn't let the rest of the computer go to sleep.

          So no, I don't generally use hibernate or sleep.

          I can't vouch for the validity that hibernate is bad for SSDs. I have to plead total ignorance on the processes involved that hibernate would impact the life of SSDs.

    2. bombastic bob Silver badge
      Trollface

      Re: flight mode

      "without installation delays during takeoff."

      "Stewardess my computer is installing updates"

      "Let me see" - takes laptop, throws it out the door, shuts the door. "OK, anyone else unable to shut down any personal electronics?"

      (At this point you see a number of people just pulling the batteries out)

      1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

        Re: flight mode

        "(At this point you see a number of people just pulling the batteries out)"

        Does press the power button for 4 seconds not work any more?

      2. Jamie Jones Silver badge

        Re: flight mode

        If having a computer on is bad for a flight, how come they are allowed on?

        Surely Mr or Mrs terrorist don't need to smuggle a bomb in their laptop, they just switch it on during takeoff.

        I call shenanigans!

        1. Baldrickk Silver badge

          Re: flight mode

          https://xkcd.com/651/

          1. Michael Wojcik Silver badge

            Re: flight mode

            You can make a pretty good impromptu knife by snapping a CD or DVD, too. A laptop is useful for that. Or just bludgeon people with the thing.

            Remember the "prove this is a real laptop by turning it on" piece of security theater from some years back? Like no one could fit a bomb into a working laptop, particularly back in those days when most of them had swappable-drive or second-battery bays.

            Most air-travel security, at least in the US, has always been a chaotic mix of theater, cargo-cult prohibitions, and rules tweaked to minimize the irritation to people wealthy enough to matter, but not wealthy enough to travel exclusively by private plane. Of course, the "turn off your personal electronics" rule predates the GWOT and is ostensibly a safety rule rather than a security one. I suspect the FAA has kept it mostly to get bulky laptops put away so evacuation is easier.

          2. Jamie Jones Silver badge
            Thumb Up

            Re: flight mode

            Haha, perfect!

  3. anthonyhegedus Silver badge

    All very clever, but how will Microsoft's happy operating system actually KNOW that it's been a failed startup? We've just had the 1809 update at a site where domain-joined machines DO start up, let the user log in and then endlessly flash the task bar on and off. I bet Windows won't realise that that counts to users as a failed startup. We're about to have 1903 as well. I don't have much faith in this.

    1. smudge Silver badge
      Boffin

      All very clever, but how will Microsoft's happy operating system actually KNOW that it's been a failed startup?

      Because the process that monitors the start-up will detect that the start-up has not terminated.

      Oh wait, didn't Turing have something to say about that?

      1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge
        Joke

        "Oh wait, didn't Turing have something to say about that?"

        Yeah, upgrade to 6G and just have a winterm boot image in firmware, all the rest in the MS cloud.

        1. Michael Wojcik Silver badge

          Yeah, upgrade to 6G and just have a winterm boot image in firmware, all the rest in the MS cloud.'

          Ridiculous-number-G aside, I wouldn't be surprised to see some organizations do this. The last time I taught a university class, a few years ago, the classroom still had Windows desktop machines that PXE-booted off the network and downloaded everything fresh when they were rebooted. While you wouldn't want such machines downloading full Windows installation images on each boot from a non-local source, they could be set up to clone a standard image from a local server and then pull updates from Microsoft.

          Of course 90% of the students came to class with their own laptops and ignored the classroom desktops. Had it been a private university, that number would likely have been 100%.

    2. This post has been deleted by its author

  4. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

    How does a machine that's failed to start up start up to remove the update that made it fail to start up?

    1. Franco Silver badge

      That immediately reminded me of one of the Monkey Island games, and "How much wood could a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?"

      Anyway, I'm pretty sure this will be replacing MS's previous magic bullet that never worked, the much vaunted but utterly useless "Last Known Good Configuration."

    2. big_D Silver badge

      The same as XP and Windows 7, after a while, they go into recovery mode, deinstall the last updates and roll back to the previous good state.

      1. MiguelC Silver badge

        Hopefully...

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        and roll back to the previous good state.

        For most laptops, that would be the point before Windows was installed.

  5. Amentheist
    Joke

    I bet it keeps rebooting

    Until you're back on Windows 7

    1. DJV Silver badge

      Re: I bet it keeps rebooting

      If only!

  6. Keith Langmead
    Facepalm

    Fixing the wrong problem

    Wow, so rather than fix the actual problem, eg that their testing systems suck / don't really exist, by bringing back proper testing in house and crucially listening and acting on reports from external testers (for instance when an update breaks things despite people having already alerted them to the problem), they're working around it by just undoing the screw ups! What could possiblty go wrong with that? Place you bets on how much actual testing has been done on this new "feature"!

    1. a_yank_lurker Silver badge

      Re: Fixing the wrong problem

      Testing - None

    2. Mark 85 Silver badge

      Re: Fixing the wrong problem

      Testing costs money. Follow the money and the board gets dinged on bonuses along with share price taking a possible hit. Risk managlement at it's best.... reduce the risk to manglement and to hell with the customers/users.

    3. fidodogbreath Silver badge

      Re: Fixing the wrong problem

      their testing systems suck

      It's the next evolution of the Internet business model. You pay for the product, you are conscripted into testing the product, and (via Slurp) you are the product.

    4. 9Rune5

      Re: Fixing the wrong problem

      Just how much testing are you proposing?

      There was a case, I believe it was last year, of some laptops where the OEM had decided to write a keyboard filter driver for their keyboards. Which invokes (at least in me) a certain "why, oh God, why?!?" reaction.

      If such a useless device driver then causes problems for Windows Update, are you really expecting MS to catch that..? They'd have to stock several warehouses full of crappy laptops and do the rounds...?

      IMO it is better to crack down on OEMs and force them to colour within the lines. Maybe start a shame-wall website with detailed write ups of the top ten offenders.

      I have three computers in my little office at home. One runs just plain Win10. One is on fast ring and my laptop is on the slow ring. I've been downloading test builds for two years or so. Never any issues. I do however install Windows from scratch, thus wiping any trace of the OEMs mishaps right at the get-go.

  7. hottuberrol

    I'm just a dumb user. I loathe my WIn10 home PC. Just opening one email in my outlook inbox - MSFTs own proprietary email app that should be seamless - takes 10 seconds or more, and if the email has images embedded, some dont ever load. And on days ending with "y", connectivity to my default HP printer disappears and I have to set up the printer again. Now imagine a Tesla-like future (its here now) where car makers wirelessly send SW updates to your car. Cant start your car to get to work because of a 2 hour update, or a broken startup cycle requiring a week of interaction with the helpdesk to fix (that was my first win10 upgrade) ? The howls of protest from the media and consumer orgs would drive the car maker to the wall, or at least force compensation. Meanwhile. MSFT flip us the bird.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      "Just opening one email in my outlook inbox - MSFTs own proprietary email app that should be seamless - takes 10 seconds or more, and if the email has images embedded, some dont ever load."

      Maybe your PC hardware is just crap? ;-)

      1. hottuberrol

        Reading emails , without making a cup of tea while each one opens, requires a laptop less than 3 years old does it ? Puh-leeease.

        There are no compute or graphic-intense apps on my 5 year old, stock samsung i5 processor laptop - the win10 upgrade mess wiped them all off, i had to install the OS from scratch and work with the helpdesk to get out of the reboot cycle. Now the laptop is no use for anything much, i keep my accounts on it, but mostly do email and itunes on an ipad. MSFT single-handedly killed off any desire to invest in another WIN machine ever again, so no, i wont be resolving this problem by spending more moola on the latest laptop only to have MSFT bork it 2 years later.

    2. Tom Chiverton 1

      Is your .PST 10gig ?!?

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Whether the PST is 10 gigs or not shouldn't really matter at all. I have crazy clients with over 70 gigs in their OST file and everything works as smoothly as ever.

        The OP just has a crappy computer or some other issues.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Whether the PST is 10 gigs or not shouldn't really matter at all. I have crazy clients with over 70 gigs in their OST file and everything works as smoothly as ever.

          Yeah, they're the fun ones when they get corruption. We limit mailboxes to 5GB. For most that prompts more intelligent decision making in what to keep and what to archive, and for the few holdouts we then extend the available quota.

    3. bombastic bob Silver badge
      Unhappy

      Meanwhile. MSFT flip us the bird.

      that seems to be standard operating procedures for a LOT of things...

    4. kokoro

      Got sick of Outlunk going into white freeze all the time, opting to boot itself on startup and losing all its GUI elements and just sitting there without being able to display anything. This is on a mobile workstation with 32gb ram and a Quadro so go figure. The final straw was the USA corporate nightmare I do some contract lecturing for (ok at least they pay for O365 so I don't have to) deciding that Outlunk now has to 2FA all the time, providing it unasked with my mobile number and won't check other accounts till it gets its code. All problems instantly solved by dumping it for emClient.

      Do the same with Wi10... err I wish.

  8. BGatez

    Amazingly fast transition from 7 pretty good, to 8 ugh why, to 10 WTF

    1. bombastic bob Silver badge
      Mushroom

      Sinofsky/Larson-Greene maneuver

      it should be known as the "Sinofsky/Larson-Greene" maneuver, where you take a perfectly good software product (Windows 7) that the customers like, and THEN turn it into a grotesque monstrosity that angers a good number (if not majority) of your existing customers and gives them NO CHOICE AT ALL but to use this, uh, *THING*, in spite of that.

      And you do it ALL in the name of "providing updates" that ARE ONLY NECESSARY SINCE YOU COULD NOT GET THINGS RIGHT THE _FIRST_ TIME AND DID NOT TEST ENOUGH!!! And you sneak in "feature creep" while you're at it, INSTEAD of fixing the problems!!! And occasionally, you BREAK THINGS EVEN WORSE.

      *cough* - I guess that covers it.

  9. Robert Carnegie Silver badge

    Assuming

    I expect that if Update KB 911 666 does get reverted, but then "engineers" fix and re-release it (either as shown, or as KB 911 667), then the "fixed" patch will be applied as an immediate update without the 30 days wait. (Unless the same thing happens with this one as well.)

    But it doesn't say that?

  10. revenant Bronze badge

    Automatically removing borked updates

    Nice. Now if they could only progress to automatically not installing the updates until they have thoroughly tested them, we'd all be a lot happier.

    1. Fading Silver badge
      Windows

      Re: Automatically removing borked updates

      Hmm using the "not install for 30 days' flag" before it even tries the first time? Now how do I set that in the registry?

    2. Fungus Bob Silver badge

      Re: Automatically removing borked updates

      Actually, MS is automatically borking removed updates.

    3. A.P. Veening

      Re: Automatically removing borked updates

      Nice. Now if they could only progress to automatically removing some incompetent managers at MicroSoft and re-instate proper testing.

  11. Wolfclaw Silver badge
    FAIL

    How about Microsoft just swallows their pride and say that anything not written for W10x64, will not work for any future version of Window,s strip out all the old crap code from Win 1,2,3,4,95,98,ME,2000,XP,Vista,7,8 and give us the clean, stable, fast 64-bit Windows we want. If software houses don't want to play, screw em !

    1. Rich 11 Silver badge

      Oi! What have you got against Windows 1.0?

      *tch* Some people just can't let go of a grudge after 30 years.

    2. Ken Hagan Gold badge
      Coat

      I am not aware of any evidence that the new code is the good stuff. If you ripped the crap out of Win10 you'd probably find you had an XP or 2K shell running on top of a fairly recent kernel.

      And who would be interested in that?

    3. the Jim bloke Silver badge

      Everything I currently want to run from the MS ecosystem is from Win 7 or earlier... no need or use for the "latest and greatest (barf)"

      How about they give us clean stable fast 64-bit Windows we want 7 !!

  12. Multivac

    I installed virtualbox on my Win 10 laptop and then created an Ubuntu (other distros are available) virtual machine on it which I do all my work on, I use portable apps to backup that virtual disk to a USB drive so when my laptop borks after an update or just overheats because Windows defender has gone mental, I just get a spare off the desktop IT guys, install virtualbox and carry on. It's a great way to isolate yourself from a lot of problems and makes the device you're working on disposable.

    1. Remy Redert

      You should probably do that the other way around. Install Linux on the machine and not have the Windows issues. Install a VM with Windows to do the few things you need Windows for.

      As a bonus, that makes it trivially easy to prevent updates from downloading (and thus installing) unless you want them to.

  13. livin' thing
    FAIL

    Windows 10 is shit.

    No further discussion needed.

  14. Trixr Bronze badge

    Not every failure is a boot failure

    Yes, I wish I could figure out what goddamned update screwed my headphone jack. Windows 10 doesn't seem to think there's such a thing as a "headphone" output device any more.

    I normally use wireless headphones, which is why it took me a while to realise there's a problem, but it's pretty fundamental that connecting a piece of physical hardware to the appropriate socket should do something appropriate. And yes, even after installing new chipset and audio drivers. It's driving me nuts.

    These monolithic updates give me the utmost sh*ts.

    1. Jellied Eel Silver badge

      Re: Not every failure is a boot failure

      Yes, I wish I could figure out what goddamned update screwed my headphone jack. Windows 10 doesn't seem to think there's such a thing as a "headphone" output device any more.

      Ah, is that the one where installing headphones into the jack marked 'headphones' prompts Win10 to go bing and ask you what audio device you just installed? With no choice for 'headphones'? If so, you're not alone. And possibly not alone in pondering the fecklessness of yoof who aren't familiar with 3.5mm jacks, and assume everything must be connected via USB.

      (which would probably mean a different message saying it's unable to find a device driver for your hardware, so would you like to 3-D print another wall to use as a head restraint?)

  15. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    What's to stop MS

    from uninstalling a critical patch under a gag order from a three letter agency?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: What's to stop MS

      ...or Redhat, or IBM, or Google, or Apple or...?

  16. Adam Inistrator

    Install. Uninstall. Reboot. Repeat. Is that a play on the rave mantra? Eat. Sleep. Rave. Repeat.. Eat. Sleep. Rave. Repeat.. Eat. Sleep. Rave. Repeat.. Eat. Sleep. Rave. Repeat.. Eat. Sleep. Rave. Repeat.. Eat. Sleep. Rave. Repeat.. Eat. Sleep. Rave. Repeat.. Eat. Sleep. Rave. Repeat.. Eat. Sleep. Rave. Repeat.. Eat. Sleep. Rave. Repeat.. well, you get the idea.

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2019