back to article What links US Supreme Court, copyright legal bills, and stadium hot dog prices? A: Oracle

Oracle can't relieve Rimini Street's coffers of $12.8m in legal bills, the US Supreme Court unanimously ruled on Monday. The database giant tried to recover non-taxable court costs from Rimini, which the Supremes have now, in a pivotal decision, said are off limits in a copyright case. Big Red and the enterprise software …

  1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

    So, legally, "full" mean "up to"

    I'm sure the marketing lobbyists are pleased.

    1. BillG Silver badge
      Alert

      Re: So, legally, "full" mean "up to"

      Good thing I read the full article.

  2. cornetman

    "Rimini engaged in a massive theft of Oracle's IP and tried to cover it up by destroying evidence and engaging in other litigation misconduct, but it got tagged for its illegal activities anyway by both judge and jury, as the opinion acknowledges."

    There was me thinking that Rimini just offered cost-effective support services to Oracle's customers.

    Silly me.

    1. Martin Summers Silver badge

      Well someone needs to!

  3. ysth

    Oracle: "Today's decision is ancillary to the core rulings against Rimini, which stand."

    Full may not be full, but apparently ancillary means 17% :)

  4. Kevin McMurtrie Silver badge
    Pint

    Snacks

    From the headline, I was thinking that this was related to the Oracle-priced snacks at Oracle Arena Food Concessions, and Rimini was going to argue to pay their bill with a few hot dogs and beers. I'm left disappointed and a bit hungry.

  5. wayne 8

    SCOTUS

    Supreme Court of the United States at its finest, arbitrating an issue over "full" versus "all" between a billion dollar corp and a million dollar corp.

    Millionaires are chew toys of billionaires.

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