back to article Earth's noggin took quite a clockin' back in the day: Now a second meteorite crater spotted under Greenland ice

Scientists believe they may have found a second meteorite impact crater lurking under ice sheets on Greenland. Researchers say they've clocked a hole measuring 22.7 miles (36.5 kilometres) wide caused by an ancient space rock slamming into our home world. The exact historical timing of the cosmic prang isn’t clear, though it …

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    1. MiguelC Silver badge

      you just can't leave Uranus alone, can you?

      1. 89724102172714182892114I7551670349743096734346773478647892349863592355648544996312855148587659264921 Bronze badge

        Uranus is never alone

    2. fishman

      Until it got hit by a large asteroid. Then it rectum.

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        1. eldakka Silver badge

          Cut back on the curry.

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  2. DavCrav Silver badge

    "The exact historical timing of the cosmic prang isn’t clear, though it appears ice has been eroding the crater for anywhere between a hundred thousand years and a hundred million years."

    I wish I could get away with such estimates.

    "How fast were you going, sir?"

    "Oh, well, somewhere between 0.2 and 200 miles an hour, I know that"

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    2. Francis Boyle Silver badge

      Now don't be sad

      Cause one out of forty* ain't bad.

      *OK, one out of 45.43 but what's a few hundred million years between friends.

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  4. JimmyPage Silver badge
    Thumb Up

    And yet, there is still life on earth ...

    Ain't nature amazing ?

    1. Alister Silver badge

      Re: And yet, there is still life on earth ...

      for the moment...

    2. DJV Silver badge

      Re: And yet, there is still life on earth ...

      At least you didn't say "intelligent" life...

      1. FrogsAndChips Silver badge

        Re: And yet, there is still life on earth ...

        What about the mice and the dolphins?

  5. swm Bronze badge

    The cratered Earth

    If two big craters are known in Greenland how many craters have yet to be discovered in the rest of the world?

    1. Version 1.0 Silver badge

      Re: The cratered Earth

      how many craters have yet to be discovered ... they've been recycled - the late heavy bombardment peppered the planet quite thoroughly but in 3-4 billion years since then most of the crust has been recycled except for a few places like Greenland.

      1. Robert Helpmann?? Silver badge
        Boffin

        Re: The cratered Earth

        the late heavy bombardment peppered the planet quite thoroughly but in 3-4 billion years since then most of the crust has been recycled except for a few places like Greenland.

        Not so much. The world as a whole bears plenty of evidence of meteor strikes. To quote someone who knows a lot more about it than I:

        "If you didn’t know better, you’d suspect meteors were targeting Australia, North America and Europe. It’s not that there are so many craters there, it’s that there are so many geologists there, plus countries affluent enough to do detailed geologic mapping."

        - Steven Dutch, Natural and Applied Sciences, University of Wisconsin – Green Bay

        There is also evidence there are craters under Antarctic ice, but it's not the most hospitable environment to go looking.

        REF: https://malagabay.wordpress.com/2013/06/05/tektites-4-primary-and-secondary-impact-craters/

        1. Allan George Dyer Silver badge
          Joke

          Re: The cratered Earth

          @Robert Helpmann?? - "It’s not that there are so many craters there, it’s that there are so many geologists there"

          You mean it's like crop circles? Bored geologists are wandering out after a night down the pub and casually digging a fake 20km crater beneath the ice in Greenland? A lot more plausible than this Chicken Little "rocks from the sky" theory.

          1. Michael Wojcik Silver badge

            Re: The cratered Earth

            Don't be ridiculous. They don't dig a crater; they just paint a picture of one, like Wile E. Coyote.

    2. Spherical Cow Bronze badge

      Re: The cratered Earth

      If you want to get some idea how many times Earth has been hit, take a look at the moon then remember that Earth is a bigger target.

  6. mark 120

    Whats that thing between the two known craters?

    About halfway between them, the round thing with the smoothish edges?

    1. DJV Silver badge

      Re: Whats that thing between the two known craters?

      Actually, I can see two there, a smaller one joined to a larger one. Ah, wait, that's probably where Ultima Thule came from!

  7. Zog_but_not_the_first Silver badge
    Alien

    Completely wrong-headed approach...

    Meteorite craters? Pah! Battle zones from the wars between the "old ones", say I.

  8. Chris Gray 1
    Devil

    More craters

    Mark 120, I came here to note the same thing.

    Go down from the "H" in Humbolt, and right from the "H" in Hiawatha and you are at the upper-right corner of this nice round feature, which even has a dimple in the middle.

    I also imagine small and large ones to the right of the Humbolt label.

    And another large one right between the first-mentioned small one and the new large official one.

    Also, go left from the top line of the dotty box, until you are under the Hiawatha...

    I've spotted features like these in our local terrain maps used on weather forecasts too. I guess you have to be properly trained to avoid imagining things that aren't really there. Maybe.

    1. Mark 85 Silver badge

      Re: More craters

      I guess you have to be properly trained to avoid imagining things that aren't really there. Maybe.

      At a minimum, you'll need a PhD and some grant money.

  9. The Nazz Silver badge

    More mundane but obvious.

    When the Earth was much younger, hmmm .... acne scars.

    Maybe multiple impacts from a "skipping" impact, rather like a stone on a pond?

    1. Spherical Cow Bronze badge

      Re: More mundane but obvious.

      Pretty sure "skipping" doesn't happen with impact craters.

  10. PapaD

    Sudbury basin

    I've always quite liked flying over the Sudbury basin (canada) because you can actually see the edges of the crater. Its a pretty impressive sight.

  11. oldfartuk

    Was this an article on how many craters or crates in greenland? Tesco has loads.

  12. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

    Hiawatha?

    An interesting choice of name considering many geological features named by European explorers are gradually being re-named back to their local, traditional names. You'd think these foreign scientists might have a look at the local language and traditions and find a name a bit more indigenous. (Yes, I know Greenland hasn't been occupied by humanity for all that much time in the great scheme of things, but still, Hiawatha sounds wrong for that region.

    1. IT Poser

      Re: Hiawatha?

      Your right about the name. Hiawatha was a co-founder of the Iroquois Confederacy circa early eighteenth century. The PC police won't complain about this name because it isn't European but its no less "wrong" than Victoria Crater would have been.

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