back to article Only plebs use Office 2019 over Office 365, says Microsoft's weird new ad campaign

Microsoft has decided to demonstrate the worth of its flagship Office 365 subscription by pitting it against its flagship Office 2019 product in a bizzaro productivity face-off. Redmond has punted out a series of ads where the Office giant pits twins against each other in a series of tasks aimed at demonstrating that while …

  1. N2 Silver badge
    Trollface

    Office 365

    Whats that then?

    Shouldn't it be Office 360?

    1. Halfmad

      Re: Office 365

      Office 360 is pretty good. Last week my manager was talking about how good Office 361 was but only because his director has been bragging about how reliable Office 364 was the week before.

    2. chivo243 Silver badge
      Devil

      Re: Office 365

      It's only early February. My guess would be by the end of the year we're looking at Office 345?

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Office 365

      >Whats that then? Shouldn't it be Office 360?

      No, Out of Office 365

      1. Dave K Silver badge

        Re: Office 365

        I must admit I was quite surprised by the video. They managed to work with Office 365 and complete several tasks without a single freeze or crash from it. I suppose that's the power of video editing for you...

    4. PeeKay

      Re: Office 365

      Shouldn't it be Office 360?

      Best one I've heard is Office 404 - Application not Found

    5. DJSpuddyLizard

      Re: Office 365

      Office 365.2425 by my calculations...

      1. el kabong

        Oriffice 365.2425... in a parallel universe, that is.

        In the real one calling it "oriffice 360 minus" would be accurate, 360 being the upper bound at this point in time. Decreasing fast.

        1. bombastic bob Silver badge
          Boffin

          Re: Oriffice 365.2425... in a parallel universe, that is.

          the probability of that universe ever actually being observed (and therefore existing) is like the limit of x approaching zero... like we know it's not zero, but it might as well be.

    6. a_yank_lurker Silver badge

      Re: Office 365

      Given my experience and my colleagues experience with Orifice3??, I would rather use a traditional desktop version.

      1. Lusty Silver badge

        Re: Office 365

        "I would rather use a traditional desktop version"

        So...O365 then. The primary difference between them is licensing. O365 allows you to install on multiple systems including mobile devices. The 2019 boxed product does not. The other difference is that O365 gets new features as they arrive while 2019 won't get most of them. There's also a web version of O365, but that's not as good as installing locally.

        1. Mike 137

          Re: Office 365

          "I would rather use a traditional desktop version"

          Agreed.

          Every time they break O365 during an "update" or your broadband goes down you get stranded without your data.

          On top of which, W2019 (or whatever desktop version) and your files are yours for life, whereas if your O365 subscription payment fails (e.g. you bank with TSB) you lose all your data.

          On top of which, using a desktop version you're not sharing your files with a potentially interested third party with more legal clout than yourself to do as it pleases.

          On top of which, promotion of continuous update as a benefit merely emphasises the need for constant fixes to a flawed product.

          1. Lusty Silver badge

            Re: Office 365

            "your broadband goes down you get stranded without your data"

            You're confusing "the Internet" with "your data". Office 365 works just fine without Internet access. Maybe you're thinking of OneDrive?

      2. Wayland Bronze badge

        Re: Office 365

        You're such a square, not hip and trendy.

    7. Tigra 07 Silver badge
      Linux

      Re: Office 365

      And here's me, slowly migrating to Libre Office at work, and finding it a delight...

      1. Alterhase
        Windows

        Re: Office 365

        I never got comfortable with the "ribbon" and so migrated to LibreOffice at work and OpenOffice at home. They do everything I need. My only problem is that LibreOffice needs to be restarted every other day, perhaps because I am hitting it pretty hard.

        1. Havin_it
          Joke

          Re: Office 365

          LibreOffice needs to be restarted every other day

          What did you do to deserve needing an office suite open at all times? My earnest sympathies.

  2. holmegm

    There's an Office 2019?

    What's the problem; it doesn't let you "draw" 3D dogs or something?

    1. chivo243 Silver badge

      Yes, and it looks exactly like Office 2016...

      1. Herring`

        If it looked and worked exactly like Office 2003, I'd be on it like a shot.

        1. jrd

          I'm still using Office 2003. It still does everything I need.

          1. Vector

            Office 97 does pretty much everything I need from an office suite. Haven't really seen anything since that I would find compelling enough to upgrade. As a matter of fact, I've seen several things since (*cough, cough* ribbon bar!) that compel me NOT to upgrade.

            1. DanceMan

              So Office 97 is the victor, Vector?

              1. Vector
            2. Oengus Silver badge

              Only reason I found to stop using Office 97 was when I switched to Linux because the latest PC I purchased with the latest version of Windows pre-installed would no longer run it and I couldn't be arsed installing the older version of Windows.

              1. Havin_it

                You could've probably run O97 under Wine (although in early days it did need a few DLLs pillaging from a Windows install).

            3. W.S.Gosset Bronze badge

              There is ONE useful upgrade to Excel 97, introduced in Excel 2000: XY scatter plots "now" give you the option of flipping the axes assumption on creation. Which means you can plot N separate data series (with labels) rather than being railroaded into it assuming it's a single data series of N points.

              However, there's also another obscure functionality which is removed -- can't remember what it was.

              1. Fred Goldstein

                Office 2007 changed file formats to OOXML, and also expanded Excel sheets from 64K to 1024K rows. That helps me a lot; 64K was way too small.

                I'm not sure what meaningfully changed later. In 2014 I bought Office 2010 and still use it; 2013 didn't seem any better and I think a couple of things were reportedly worse. And I still don't like the ribbon.

                1. Baldrickk Silver badge

                  I still have my Office 07 disk. Not bought a newer version since. Yes, it brought the ribbon (I can live with that) but it did bring the new formats and expanded Excel sheets.

                  What microsoft need to do is try and convince me that I need either 365 or 2019.

                  1. A.P. Veening

                    Re: Convincing

                    "What microsoft need to do is try and convince me that I need either 365 or 2019."

                    Microsoft already convinced me a long time ago I need LibreOffice.

                2. jeffroimms

                  ref Office 2007

                  Anyone with Office 2007 still installed and wishing to keep it so (post O/S rebuild situation) should look into Virtual Machine creation and make an image ASAP... Microsoft turned off the activation servers last year, so theyre closing the loop on the longevity of their responsibilities to support older software.. this is a reasonable business practise, but it could be advertised more as it provides a significant bill increase for the end user when a hard drive fails..

              2. paulll

                Should be using 1-2-3 if you're serious about graphing...

                1. Wayland Bronze badge

                  Yeah but 1-2-3 only works in Linux Mint 18 and won't work in Linux Mint 19.

                  1. Anonymous Coward
                    Anonymous Coward

                    In, approximately, '94/'95 I was using WordPerfect Office Suite which contained Windows versions of WordPerfect, Quattro Pro, Borland Paradox. I thought that each of those products worked wonderfully. Been stuck on the Windows Office treadmill since shortly after that. LibreOffice at home :)

                2. Rafael #872397

                  10203

                  Feh! Visicalc rules.

                  1. cmaurand

                    Re: 10203

                    Quattro Pro

                    1. Version 1.0 Silver badge

                      Re: 10203

                      Supercalc please ... I once ran an entire corporate accounting system (including state tax calculations) on Supercalc .... then they "upgraded" to Quickbooks which crashes every January and tell you that it can be fixed by buying the current version.

                      1. W.S.Gosset Bronze badge

                        Re: 10203

                        WingZ!

                        The entire spreadsheet app was written in its own macro language...

                  2. paulll

                    Re: 10203

                    Well, yeah. Or so I hear. But if you wanted to graph info from your spreadsheet in the 90's, 1-2-3 was the way to go.

                    Firing up an emulator to run visicalc and finding a way to get one's data into it, would've been waaaay quicker than coaxing a simple line graph out of excel '97...

                    1. W.S.Gosset Bronze badge

                      Re: 10203

                      ?

                      Excel 1.05-->today: click, shift-arrow+arrow [standard range-extend/select], click : choose from variety of chart options, which have only had a handful of additions (radar plots, etc) in the intervening 30yrs.

                      80s thru 90s, when the 123 boys were struggling, I'd just grab their workbook and do the graph they wanted in Excel, then hand it back to them in a variety of formats for them to add to their documents.

              3. Havin_it

                Excel 2K had a better easter egg, tho'.

                1. W.S.Gosset Bronze badge

                  Pfft.

                  Excel 97 Easter Egg was an actual flight-simulator: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gYb5GUs0dM [1.25mins]

                  Note the Credits on the monolith in that crater.

            4. DavCrav Silver badge

              "Office 97 does pretty much everything I need from an office suite."

              If Notepad had a word count it would give me everything I need from an office suite. But I guess that's because I use LaTeX.

        2. N2 Silver badge

          Re: Office 2003

          "If it looked and worked exactly like Office 2003, I'd be on it like a shot"

          I think they peaked there, after that it was cosmetic or unwanted naff 'features' and to say the least, I was using it less and less of it the more they 'improved' it. I mean the ribbon? what utter crap.

          Office 2003 lives on for me, under a VM on Windows XP - because it works.

          1. Rol Silver badge

            Re: Office 2003

            I'd be happy to still be using 2003, but I have to keep pace with what is currently deployed in the various businesses I work/worked for. Hence I'm on 2013 with little sign of that changing.

            Quite a lot of spreadsheets and VBA coding prop up some ailing legacy systems, and slavishly following the Office iterations would result in several multi-billion pound organisations collapsing into nothingness.

            365 would in all effect, be the equivalent of installing a random virus on every machine on a regular basis.

            We all know how well Microsoft's compatibility feature works with its own products, so what chance has our in-house software workarounds got?

            1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

              Re: Office 2003

              "Quite a lot of spreadsheets and VBA coding prop up some ailing legacy systems, and slavishly following the Office iterations would result in several multi-billion pound organisations collapsing into nothingness."

              Dead men walking.

              1. Wayland Bronze badge

                Re: Office 2003

                And those Dead men can keep on functioning as long as we can maintain the operating environment.

                However it is really time to recode these bespoke business tools in a language with more longevity. COBOL perhaps?

                1. A.P. Veening
                  Pint

                  Re: Office 2003

                  You deserve more than one upvote just for mentioning COBOL and its longevity, have a --->

      2. katrinab Silver badge

        Excel 2019 has a =SWITCH() function in excel, which is a bit more convenient than doing nested IFs. That's the only difference I've noticed.

        By the way, if you install Office 2016 and relicence it with a 2019 serial no, it will work as Office 2019 with the additional features, and that is a way to get it to install in versions of Windows earlier than 10.

    2. Dr. Ellen
      Happy

      Shot-fire, I'm still using Office 2003 (when I'm not using LibreOffice). I'd still be using Office 97, but it doesn't play well with Win7.

  3. Mephistro Silver badge
    Angel

    LOL

    This is Microsoft at its best, pandering to companies management and other "slow people".

    1. N2 Silver badge

      Re: LOL

      We have two products, which work differently but do more or less the same thing:

      Product 1 we get 120$

      Product 2 we get 60$ per year

      Which ever gets the least money is utter shyte and we must portray it as so, even if the opposite is true.

      1. Flakk Silver badge

        Re: LOL

        I think it may have something to do with predictability. These days, it seems that mere revenue is not enough. Companies want predictable revenue, and subscription-based services offer a more predictable revenue stream than one-off purchases.

        I bought an Office 365 sub for my daughter when she started college. I kept it after she graduated solely because $10/mo for 1TB of cloud storage isn't a terrible deal. I use it to supplement my on-site backups and encrypt everything I put up there.

        1. Suricou Raven

          Re: LOL

          Or they want off the upgrade treadmill. Microsoft's traditional model only worked if customers needed to routinely update to the latest version, and so pay for it - but is that still true? Look how many years it took them to drive customers off of XP, and Windows Seven is still in common usage. Office is the same: For a lot of customers, Office 2000 would still do everything they need, and Office 2013 is good enough for almost all.

          In software, if you make a good-enough product, you deprive yourself of the chance to sell later versions. People won't pay to move away from what works without a very good reason.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            @Suricou Raven - Re: LOL

            That's why they move you to a subscription model so you can pay for the rest of your life without a very good reason.

          2. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

            Re: LOL

            "Microsoft's traditional model only worked if customers needed to routinely update to the latest version, and so pay for it"

            That model worked fine when the format of a .doc file changed with every version so victims had to upgrade whenever someone sent then a file in the new version.

            Then they got sucked into having to arrange an international standard format for themselves. Now they can't play tricks with the file format. They got round that with a change of UI so that once a cohort of new recruits had been trained on the new UI by the MS education programme hit employment they had to have the new version bought because they couldn't use the old one.

            You can't play that game too often so they discovered subscription - lock-in on steroids.

          3. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

            Re: LOL

            "In software, if you make a good-enough product, you deprive yourself of the chance to sell later versions. People won't pay to move away from what works without a very good reason."

            Yes, their previous modus operandi was to tweak the file formats with each new release, then realise that older version were incompatible with the new version and then spend 6 months developing a fix so older versions could at least read the newer versions. By which time so many companies who had not upgraded to the latest version were so frustrated by getting the new format documents that they were forced to upgrade so as not to appear to be luddites by continually asking suppliers, customers, clients to re-send documents in the "old" format.

            Back when I still needed to use MSOffice, I tended to automatically use Save As and select the previous version of Office for the file format if I was sending a copy outside our org. That vastly increased the chances of them being able to read it.

          4. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: LOL

            Very true, but how about they make something BETTER than the old version to get people to buy it, or even come up with a TOTALLY NEW product.

            Sorry that I shouted but making a 'new' product that is no better (or even worse) than the old version will not charm the money from my wallet.

          5. dajames Silver badge

            Re: LOL

            Or they want off the upgrade treadmill. Microsoft's traditional model only worked if customers needed to routinely update to the latest version, and so pay for it - but is that still true? Look how many years it took them to drive customers off of XP, and Windows Seven is still in common usage.

            There's a piece of wisdom from the Ancients that says: If you want your users to upgrade from version X of something to version X+1, you should try to ensure that Version X+1 is at least as good as version X, that the upgrade breaks nothing, and that using version X+1 will not require re-learning the user interface.

            Clever chaps those Ancients.

            If version X+1 is widely perceived to be a cartload of turds the users will stick with version X.

            Had Vista not been a resource hog requiring a substantial hardware upgrade to equal the speed of XP it wouldn't have been the dismal failure that it was. Had Windows 8 kept the UI of Windows 7 people wouldn't have seen it as something strange and incomprehensible and to be avoided.

            Microsoft have only themselves to blame.

          6. A-nonCoward
            Linux

            Re: LOL->malware

            In software, if you make a good-enough product, you deprive yourself of the chance to sell later versions. People won't pay to move away from what works without a very good reason.

            That's why malware.

            "I think i need to upgrade to the newer Windows. My computer at home is running slow lately", heard from my secretary a few years ago. By that time I had learned it was unwise to predicate Linux at work - just use it, in my work computer, and at home.

        2. Cynic_999 Silver badge

          Re: LOL

          "

          because $10/mo for 1TB of cloud storage isn't a terrible deal.

          "

          You think? Really?

          You can get a USB 1TB HDD for the price of 5 months subscription if you need portability.

          Or a 1TB NAS for the same price as about 1 years' subscription.

          Both solutions are at the least 10 times faster, and will work fine when the Internet's down (which usually happens just when you urgently need the data).

          And I trust the reliability of a HDD more than I trust "the cloud" as well.

          1. Jack of Shadows Silver badge

            Re: LOL

            On the flip side, local storage doesn't protect you from local disasters: Fire, flood, you know, the things that regularly kill small businesses and home offices being wiped out; I do make extensive use of local storage to the tune of 24+ TB, yet remote storage off-site for anything I can't live without is important as well.

            [Technically, yes, I can live without, just makes my otherwise painful existence totally pointless.]

            1. xeroks

              Re: LOL

              $10 per TB per month is the same as an AWS s3 bucket. Though using S3 for backups, you can move the files to Glacier, which costs $4

          2. Jedipadawan

            Re: LOL

            All true but... buy anti-shock HDD's only.

            I speak from painful experience... twice.

        3. JohnFen Silver badge

          Re: LOL

          "$10/mo for 1TB of cloud storage isn't a terrible deal."

          It isn't? I don't use cloud storage, so I don't know the going rates, but $120/yr sounds horribly expensive to me.

          1. Terry 6 Silver badge

            Re: LOL

            I kind of wonder, btw, how much of 1TB of storage would get used by the majority of users.

            And also, if it's a corporate use, how you manage when you can't/don't replace a staff member, so don't need that subscription, if it is holding all that data.

        4. Jack of Shadows Silver badge

          Re: LOL

          I've 1 TB through Asus for much less than that. List is $99, paid $49 for opening, $34.95 on renewal last year. So far, it's never gone missing either.

        5. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: LOL

          If here college has a microsoft volume subscription they'll likely have a free A1 and Office365 Pro Plus subscription for her for free.

        6. Sporkfighter

          Re: LOL

          Creating documents in proprietary formats using rented software that reports your activity stored on somebody else's cloud...who owns those documents?

      2. Suricou Raven

        Re: LOL

        Eventually the web of internal politics is going to resolve the issue - someone higher up the chain will wonder why the company is producing two products that are in direct competition. Perhaps this anti-Office-2019 ad is part of the preparations to eventually abandon the office suite altogether, after first nudging those users onto Office 365.

        1. Wayland Bronze badge

          Re: LOL

          "eventually abandon the office suite altogether" - well it happened with Lotus.

          I was not a fan of their products myself but Lotus Notes allowed ordinary office workers to get some amazing things done.

          Whilst I would spend a week coding something up in MS Access my bosses PA could code the same thing in Lotus Notes in the morning and be graphing the results from the users by the afternoon.

          OK so in terms of programming style it was a bit amateur but you can't argue with how effective it was.

          Why did this amazing tool go away? Was it so real programmers could keep their jobs and not be replaced by the bosses secretary?

          1. deadmonkey

            Re: LOL

            "I was not a fan of their products myself but Lotus Notes allowed ordinary office workers to get some amazing things done."

            I loved notes and wished for years that it had been taken up more widely, rather than the alternative world of people using email to connect the dots in their business.

    2. Spanners Silver badge
      Flame

      Re: LOL

      That is precisely how they got into a position of desktop dominance. The people who trained a lot of the readers here would not touch MS products so MS went over the heads of those who knew and MS Windows 3 or less was dumped on the world by a mixture of accountants, Art Grads and MBAs, few of whom knew much about computers.

      They are sticking to a proven method.

      1. Marketing Hack Silver badge
        IT Angle

        Re: LOL

        The subscription business model is all about:

        A) pushing out updates as they are ready, and not storing them up for a big new version release that you need to once again sell to customers.

        B) More importantly, getting a predictable revenue stream from the software offering, so you don't have huge dips and spikes in revenues around new version release dates.

        Those aren't necessarily bad reasons to move to subscription services. It's not in an organization's interest to see their important suppliers suffer and start shutting down operations/reducing investment in future products. (Granted, sometimes I think that Microsoft is an exception to that rule.) But you have to price things carefully to avoid outright soaking of customers, while providing them with value in return for the value their change in payment terms is providing to you.

        1. JohnFen Silver badge

          Re: LOL

          "But you have to price things carefully to avoid outright soaking of customers"

          Who is doing that, though? With the subscription services I've seen, the total cost of the subscription is always greater than the cost of the same software as a native application. Even more so when you consider that it makes it impossible to decide to stick with an old version and no longer buy upgrades.

          I certainly haven't seen all of the subscription offerings available, but I haven't actually seen one that doesn't seem like it's soaking the customers.

          1. Marketing Hack Silver badge

            Re: LOL

            That is especially true with something like Office. When I bought my current personal laptop, I very briefly looked at MS' current Office offerings, then reviewed my trusty old Office 2007 Personal Edition disks, and finally decided to go with LibreOffice, to take any decade-old security gaps off the table.

            If I were MS, I would take the revenue hit and reduce the current price by an order of 1/3. There is just not much functionality that has been added to Office in the last 10 years (or more). And certainly most of their developer time on the Office 3xx offering (Are we in the 350's on actual 2019 availability now?) seems to be getting spent on enabling delivery and updates via the internet.

            So I kind of think they are rent-seeking on their cloudy version these days.

        2. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

          Re: LOL

          Once you've got them locked into B) you don't need to worry about A), avoiding soaking customers or anything else. At least not until the customers realise there really are alternatives.

          1. Wayland Bronze badge

            Re: LOL

            The smallest thing can keep you trapped in MS Office. However most people using MS Office are not doing anything that's not exactly the same in LibreOffice.

  4. Joe Drunk
    Mushroom

    Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

    Local copies of productivity apps for me. 'We Apologise for the unavailability' is unacceptable.

    1. FlossyThePig

      Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

      Both Office 2019 and Office 365 can be loaded locally.

      Wearing my hat as family IT specialist I have my grand-daughters laptop which requires the latest version of Office 365 installed. It's a free download for students and teachers at schools and colleges, providing the establishment has signed up for the deal.

      1. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

        Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

        "It's a free download for students and teachers at schools and colleges"

        It's free to the user, but not to the establishment (site licenses can cost serious $$$, even for educational institutions)

        1. Pirate Dave
          Pirate

          Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

          "site licenses can cost serious $$$, even for educational institutions"

          Nah, the EES volume licenses are fairly cheap - around $10/user per year. That was for the plan that only offers students Office365 to use at home (which Microsoft says is "free" as part of the base Windows licensing). It does cost a bit more to include WAH for standard Office 20xx for students, maybe double the price? We dropped that where I used to work when MS came out with the "free" Office365 back in 2012 or so. Microsoft wants to make it as easy as possible for schools (especially universities) to push MS software out to the future Microsoft customers...

          1. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

            Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

            Got that, just wanted to highlight the difference between 'free', and 'free at point of use'. Somebody, somewhere, is always paying. And if they're not, then they're the product.

          2. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

            I guess I'm [un]lucky - the firm I work for (two subsidiaries removed) has a deal where I can buy Office 2019 for home use for $10.

            1. Someone Else Silver badge

              Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

              ...and I can "buy" LibreOffice for a whole lot less than that....

              1. W.S.Gosset Bronze badge

                Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

                Libre Office doesn't work for anything non-trivial. I wish it DID. But it doesn't.

                1. veti Silver badge

                  Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

                  Fortunately, a lot of home users' use cases for Office are entirely trivial.

                  It makes perfect sense that there's a free alternative for those people. If you can't tell the difference between MS and Libre, you probably *shouldn't* have to pay that sort of money for your needs.

                  If MS cared, they would produce a cut down version of Office (anyone remember Microsoft Works?) and bundle it into Windows for free. But why would they care? Libre is no threat to them.

                  1. Terry 6 Silver badge

                    Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

                    There are an awful lot of small businesses and other organisations out there. And a great many use a spreadsheet and WP. Many probably would even use a diary and contact list (Outlook).

                    And for these non-corporate business users LO would be more than good enough, even if there are some big players who need something that only MS Office can provide. (It's way out of my league to know what that might be). Ironically it was Outlook that kept me tied in for along time, until Lightning in Thunderbird got good enough, and that still takes an add-on to make it work properly and synchronise across devices.

                    1. W.S.Gosset Bronze badge

                      Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

                      > Fortunately, a lot of home users' use cases for Office are entirely trivial.

                      >It makes perfect sense that there's a free alternative for those people. If you can't tell the difference between MS and Libre, you probably *shouldn't* have to pay that sort of money for your needs.

                      I agree, Veti.

                      Can't quite agree with yourself, though, Terry 6. It's very hard not to run right off the end of LO's capabilities if you're doing anything non-trivial, and the additional friction of friggin around manually to fudge back in manually what you need, can only be costly for small businesses. Basically, if you're doing more than a list + twiddly calcs, or repetitions of simple letters, LO is a PITA.

                2. dajames Silver badge

                  Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

                  Libre Office doesn't work for anything non-trivial. I wish it DID. But it doesn't.

                  What's the factoid? 90% of Office users only ever use 10% of the features?

                  LibeOffice works pretty well for most people, just about all of the time.

                  1. elgarak1

                    Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

                    The problem with that factoid is that one could think 90% of the users only need or want 10% of the features. I don't believe that is true. Most users would benefit, and could learn and routinely use, more than 10% of the features.

                    The reason they only use 10% of the features of MS Office is that a lot of its features are buggy and crappily implemented.

                    But Microsoft has no incentive to fix that. They still get the money by being "the Standard" (undeservedly), and users have arranged themselves to work around the crappiness. It's sad how much productivity and progress is wasted that way.

                3. keithpeter
                  Coat

                  Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

                  Depends on your definition of trivial.

                  I find LO fine for my trivial word-processing, spread-sheeting and presentation needs. Typically course guides with 80 pages, formulas, diagrams &c associated presentations destined for import into interactive whiteboard softare. Nothing amazing.

                  For non-trivial stuff (in my definition) I'm using LaTeX / programmatically generated graphics anyway.

                  1. Michael Wojcik Silver badge

                    Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

                    Ditto. I'm forced to use Office of one sort or another at work (generally to read stuff generated by other people, since I can usually get away with something relatively sane, such as MediaWiki, for documents I generate).

                    But for my academic and personal stuff, I've always used OO or LO for spreadsheets and presentations, and LaTeX (usually via LyX) for text. HTML I write by hand in vim and check with a validator. I've never, ever missed Office in this context. Not once.

            2. Carpet Deal 'em
              Stop

              Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

              Read the fine print on the deal: you'll have to shell out the big bucks for a full license if you leave/get disemployed.

          3. mark l 2 Silver badge

            Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

            "Nah, the EES volume licenses are fairly cheap - around $10/user per year. "

            Yes but if you have 1000s of users that is tens of thousands of dollars every year. Where as you could probably get away with free office alternatives for the majority of users and for those that have to use MS office buy it just for those users.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: laptop which requires the latest version of Office 365 installed

        er, what?!

      3. N2 Silver badge

        Re Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

        "It's a free download for students and teachers at schools and colleges,"

        Not. It may be free for the students and teachers but I can assure you theres a giant bill sucking at the financial teat of the academic establishment.

        What would be a better idea, is if some of those in academia, that make such decisions told MS to fuck off and relied on any of the free offerings, such as open office instead.

        1. Jedipadawan

          Re: Re Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

          Agree but.. Open Office is dead in all but name.

          Libreoffice is the replacement and works a treat. You couldn't pay me to go back to Office... and I used to love it!

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

      Office 365 has client applications for most of the suite (depending on licence) which work fine without the cloud. You just might not be able to get at your files if you store them all in the cloud but you could just as easily elect to save them locally or on your network.

      1. Cuddles Silver badge

        Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

        "Office 365 has client applications for most of the suite (depending on licence) which work fine without the cloud. You just might not be able to get at your files if you store them all in the cloud but you could just as easily elect to save them locally or on your network."

        If you're going to install a local client and work on local files, why would you want to pay for a subscription cloud service instead of just paying once for the actual local client? The only reason to use Office 360ish is if you actually want the cloudiness; if the only way to make it work reliably is to ignore all the cloudiness, there's simply no reason for it to exist at all.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

          Well that is your choice. Do you want the continually updating Office 365 version of the client or the stationary Office 2019 version of the client? Do you want the extra application that come part of the Office 365 suite, some of which are great, some not so great.

          There are some advantages to Office 365, the disadvantages are the costs and ongoing nature at that. However if I wasn't going to use Office 365 I would probably use LibreOffice/Google Apps free instead - like I do at home.

          1. JohnFen Silver badge

            Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

            "Do you want the continually updating Office 365 version of the client or the stationary Office 2019 version of the client?"

            Stationary, please. Continually-updating anything is very ungood.

            1. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

              Continually-updating anything is very ungood.

              I hope not in the same way Windows 10 continues "updating"

              They're really doing a brand-new full install of windows every so often.

              Windows Service Packs were easier to deal with. Oh look, it's Windows 10 Falling Over 2019 Creators Edition - build 19402201. That why I couldn't use my PC yesterday.

              1. JohnFen Silver badge

                Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

                I made my comment with the utopian assumption that updates never cause malfunctions. The reason that I consider continually-updating software to be bad is because it can change at any time in ways that make you alter your workflow. Anything that changes workflow is something that shouldn't be foisted on users unilaterally. Users should be able to choose if and when they want to make that change.

                Service packs rarely changed workflows. They mostly fixed bugs, instead. That sort of update is fine.

            2. Vector

              Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

              Yeah, when I saw that "continuous update" thing in the article, my first thought was "Great! So I get to relearn how the apps work every few months."

              None for me, thanks!

        2. Robert Helpmann?? Silver badge
          Childcatcher

          Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

          If you're going to install a local client and work on local files, why would you want to pay for a subscription cloud service instead of just paying once for the actual local client?

          I agree with the sentiment, but my college student child got the cloud version pre-installed on her school supplied laptop, but stores everything locally because she often works from locations with no connectivity. Choice is good, even in cases that may only make sense for a small percentage of a user base.

          1. Vector

            Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

            Choice is great! Insisting that you make the "right" choice, not so much...

    3. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

      Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

      I use Office 365, have never had availability issues. As far as I can tell the app is local but checks in with the mothership from time to time; I've gone 3 weeks with no connectivity and it's been fine.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

        Go 1 more week and it will have stopped working

        The license check has a max period of 30 days.

        Office 365 doesn't work well in high security disconnected environments like the ones I work in. That is why we are moving away from Microsoft products now, they want you to use azure, can't do that, but they want you to, so remove features and stop supporting things to try and force you. So have to say good bye to Microsoft.

        1. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

          Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

          Makes sense. So for most users that will be fine - checking in once per 30 days allows for internet outages, holidays and so on. Presumably after this you can check in by phone as well if you're out in the boonies somewhere?

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

            "Presumably after this you can check in by phone as well if you're out in the boonies somewhere?"

            No. Internet is needed.

        2. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

          "That's not a problem, I've been disconnected for two weeks"

          "That online service is shit, If you don't connect for 30 days it' kicks you off"

          "Nothing like having your work day extended 29 days so you can bitch about MS"

          "But but but people on here hate M$"

          "Yes, it's difficult to discern but the bile and moving goalposts definitely suggest that."

          1. JohnFen Silver badge

            Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours

            In this case, my attitude is not coming from a "hate Microsoft" place. It's coming from a "hate software-as-a-service" place.

        3. muhfugen

          Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

          You do realize this would be the use case for 2019?

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

            Yes, but as you can see, and had been said by Microsoft Office 2019 is the last perpetually licensed office. Why go to a product, keeping your dependencies on said product that is essentially EOL. With the replacement needing Internet access.

            System center is the same, they are moving functionality to azure.

            DSC, the pull servers haven't been updated in a few years, guess where it has been.... Azure.

            1. JohnFen Silver badge

              Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

              "Why go to a product, keeping your dependencies on said product that is essentially EOL."

              Why not? If the program continues to meet your needs, does it matter if it's EOL or not?

              1. Anonymous Coward
                Anonymous Coward

                Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

                Yes it does, again, high security area, hence the disconnected environment. All systems must be supported.All software provided with security updates. If its EOL there is no path to the next product or support, so has to be replaced at a later date no matter what. Office 2019 and office 2016 support ends the same day.

                This isn't working at home.

                If you are concerned about security, the product needs to be actively supported, if its not it increases your exposure. Even with disconnected environments which I work with, you need to be concerned about updating as there are other avenues to retrieve the data. But to execute those avenues you still need to have a way to exploit it.

                1. JohnFen Silver badge

                  Re: Nothing like having your work day extended a few more hours because 'The Cloud' is unavailable.

                  Yes, the enterprise has different rules, and whether or not a product is EOL can make a huge difference there. For home users, not so much.

  5. nichomach

    Personally, I use Office 365 Home because it covers the whole family for £79.99. If I *only* had to think about myself, I'd probably buy the 2019 version, but for me, the subscription is more cost-effective.

    1. Bob the Skutter

      Agree if you've got 3 computers at home and buy the office 2019 for them that's £360 for each. So will cost only cost in if you don't upgrade again for almost 5 years. Plus you get to use the O365 apps on tablets/ phones.

      1. The Oncoming Scorn Silver badge
        Pint

        Cheaper Yet

        I bought keys for Office 2016 Professional from Amazon for the princely sum of $20, they work just fine on each of the systems I installed them on.

      2. katrinab Silver badge

        I upgraded from 2013 to 2019, and I usually skip versions of Office when upgrading.

        The main benefit I find from the upgrade is better support for 4k monitors, plus a couple of new Excel features than I am using, but could live without.

      3. DiViDeD Silver badge

        Re: Plus you get to use the O365 apps on tablets/ phones.

        Genuine question here. Is there anyone, anyone at all who does serious work in Excel or Access on a phone?

        1. Rockets

          Re: Plus you get to use the O365 apps on tablets/ phones.

          Is there anyone, anyone at all who does serious work in Excel or Access on a phone?

          I use Excel from a iPad or iPhone quite often to update my time sheets and a few other things from OneDrive. Is it serious work - well it's the basis of how I get paid so I consider it serious enough. Is it something that I could do with Google Docs etc sure but I need to forward the time sheets to a accountant who requests them in Excel format based on a template they use. If by serious work you mean complex formulas and dozens of rows and columns then it's not.

          1. bombastic bob Silver badge
            Meh

            Re: Plus you get to use the O365 apps on tablets/ phones.

            /me notes that the RARE use case should not drive the market...

          2. katrinab Silver badge

            Re: Plus you get to use the O365 apps on tablets/ phones.

            Access isn't available on the phone.

            I use Excel to update my expense claim sheet on the go. Is that serious work? I think so.

            By the way, you don't need an O359 subscription to use Office Mobile. you get one or two extra features if you have a subscription, but I've never needed to use those features, whatever they are.

          3. DiViDeD Silver badge

            Re: Plus you get to use the O365 apps on tablets/ phones.

            Well yeah, obviously timesheets. Course - most critical work there is!

      4. hammarbtyp Silver badge

        The standard office licence covers you for up to 3 computers.

        Since i got mine for £10 through a work offer, then that's £10 in total.

        Even the student edition is only £120. To be honest I haven't met anyone who has ever paid the full wack

        1. nichomach

          The "work offer" would be because your company is on something like an Enterprise Subscription Agreement which includes software assurance (and thus home use rights), or possibly an O365 subscription (don't know whether that includes home use). We're not, and my wife's employer doesn't offer that either.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            O365 subscriptions allow you to install on any 5 computers, IIRC. My employer requires me to prioritise work devices first, but is happy to allow any remaining installs to be used on personal devices. There was a warning that if my employment was terminated I'd lose the ability to use Office on the home devices though.

    2. nematoad Silver badge
      Unhappy

      " I use Office 365 Home because it covers the whole family for £79.99."

      Is that per year?

      'Cos if it is then I think that I will stay with LibreOffice because it covers the whole family for £0.

      1. sabroni Silver badge

        How much storage do you get with that? The office licence includes one drive according to comments above...

        1. katrinab Silver badge

          I have 16TB of storage courtesy of a Proliant microserver that cost me €200 for an old model about 5 years ago, + 4 x 6TB disks. It isn't offsite, which has advantages and disadvantages,

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            So you're paying via your electricity bill. We get it. :)

        2. nichomach

          1TB per person.

    3. DropBear Silver badge
      Trollface

      Come on, you can't just leave us on a cliffhanger like that - which part of the family has work-related MS compatibility obligations that categorically preclude zero-cost options like LibreOffice - the wife or the kids? Or, wait... was it the butler wot dunnit...?!?

      1. nichomach

        Wife and kid; they use MS Office and are comfortable with it. Between my desktop, laptop and their machines, plus use on mobile devices, it's worth it.

    4. Rockets

      "Personally, I use Office 365 Home because it covers the whole family"

      I'm the same. There's 5 of us and it covers all our devices - 3 Windows PC's, 3 Mac's and 8 iOS devices. Sure I could use something free but my wife is familiar with Office and uses Excel heavily and she's familiar with it and she doesn't deal well with change. I want my kids to use Office as most of the corporate world uses it so they will have better prepared for a job if they have Office skills.

      My dad has a small business and they were still running Office 2007 last year and have a local Exchange server. I looked into Office 365 for them, looked at the declared support lifetimes and we did the maths. For him it worked out cheaper to buy Office 2016 for the 7 Office PC's & laptops as they'll keep using it for as long as they can. They aren't power users at all but use most of the features of Exchange. The only reason we upgraded Office 2007 was because it was no longer supported.

      Later this year we'll replace the local Exchange server (SBS 2011) with Office 365 Business Essentials which is only Exchange, Teams, OneDrive and SharePoint. We are only going this way because MS doesn't sell Small Business Server any more so a full license of Exchange, CALS and a server to run it on is more expensive than O365. Also means we don't need to back it up any more. We'll get a small server to run Windows Essentials for their AD, file & print sharing and Direct access.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        “better prepared for a job if they have Office skills”

        Anyone who might be scared to use LibreOffice, etc, because they will be “better prepared for a job if they have Office skills” is making a false argument. Microsoft Office isn’t that different to LibreOffice, it mostly just (nowadays) has a weird menu/toolbar/“ribbon” structure.

        Anyone who is so hardcoded to using just one application by rote is going to be completely fscked the next time Microsith decide to mess with the interface. Using LibreOffice at home will if anything only enhance your skills because you will be more used to and more resilient to changes in working practices.

    5. bombastic bob Silver badge
      Linux

      Libre Office can be used by the entire family for a cost zero.

  6. MMR

    What's lower than plebs?

    Only plebs use Office 2019 over Office 365, says Microsoft's weird new ad campaign

    So if I don't use MS Office at all in Microsoft's logic I barely pass as a human? I'm ok with that

    1. david 64

      Re: What's lower than plebs?

      Peons?

    2. sabroni Silver badge
      Facepalm

      Re: What's lower than plebs?

      M$ are now literally calling people cunts.

      And they fucked my dog.

    3. The Oncoming Scorn Silver badge
      Alien

      Re: What's lower than plebs?

      But since they undoubtedly define themselves as human beings, I would choose to accept that as more of a compliment than anything else.

      Shamelessly borrowed from Blakes 7.

    4. Someone Else Silver badge
      Boffin

      Re: What's lower than plebs?

      So if I don't use MS Office at all in Microsoft's logic I barely pass as a human?

      Not at all. It means you are generally much smarter that the average Micros~1 fanboi/drone, with highly developed analysis skills (yes, with an 's', dammit!) and the capability of employing deductive reasoning.

  7. HarryPotterHasPTSD

    Whats the difference?

    Well for one, One still works when the internet is down... The other only works "if your internet stays up 365 days a year".

    1. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

      Re: Whats the difference?

      Except that's not true at all, is it.

      1. Mephistro Silver badge

        Re: Whats the difference?

        Yay & nay.

        Imagine that document you typed in your home yesterday night, that one that took you two hours to redact. Yes, the one you needed to bring to that meeting with your boss and an important customer.

        Imagine O365 stops working before the meeting.

        I know, you are knowledgeable in IT and would make a local copy in a thumbdrive, but most users are not knowledgeable in IT, and MS describing their cloudy solutions as almost infallible doesn't help here either.

        1. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

          Re: Whats the difference?

          If it's in OneDrive it's also synced to your local machine (unless you changed default settings). So you'd have to take additional steps to ensure it was ONLY stored on the Internet, and not on your machine. Not steps that IT n00bs will be taking any time soon.

          1. sabroni Silver badge
            WTF?

            Re: Whats the difference?

            Look, can all the people who actually use Office 365 just fuck off so we can keep fantasising about how terrible it is?

          2. Mephistro Silver badge
            Coat

            Re: Whats the difference?

            "...it's also synced to your local machine..."

            If your "local machine" at home is a desktop, you still need to specifically copy the file to a thumbdrive.

            If your local machine is a laptop and you already have a desktop at the office, you're forced to either take your laptop to the office or copy the file to a thumbdrive.

            If your company forces you to use a company laptop at the office instead of a desktop, then you don't need to use the thumbdrive, but I'm sorry for you.

            8^)

            1. veti Silver badge

              Re: Whats the difference?

              And having a non-cloudy version of Office helps that situation how, exactly?

              1. Mephistro Silver badge

                Re: Whats the difference?

                Easy. The user is not tempted to trust the cloud, more so if whoever installed Office has disabled the option, as I usually do.

                Seriously now, trusting MS (or any third party) with your important files should be a no-no for any security conscious company.

        2. Someone Else Silver badge
          Coat

          @Mephisto -- Re: Whats the difference?

          "almost infallible".

          Is that anything like "almost pregnant"?

  8. Zippy´s Sausage Factory
    Windows

    Here's a test I could give them to do - open an Excel sheet I use a lot and update it. I had to open an Excel spreadsheet in Libre Office and then save it again so that Excel would open it without crashing.

    And my employers still pay for MS Office. Sigh...

    1. Will Godfrey Silver badge
      Facepalm

      I remember having to do that for friends' Word documents. I don't know if it still happens, but apparently Word could save a file with a stated length different from its actual length, and when you tried to reload it it Word would throw the toys out of the pram. Open Office on the other hand would just load what was actually there, and re-write the correct length when re-saving.

      1. Voyna i Mor Silver badge

        Word could save a file with a stated length different from its actual length

        God, I remember that.

        Two minute hate for Microsoft now.

  9. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    One word: Libre Office

    1. Terry 6 Silver badge

      One word?

      1. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

        Two words - involving sex and travel.

      2. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

        "One word?"

        It should have been.

        LibreOffice.

  10. SVV Silver badge

    I'm confused

    Surely Office 2019 must be better than Office 365, because 2019 is five and a half times bigger than 365 and bigger version numbers mean better, right?

    1. andy 103

      Re: I'm confused

      They also mean more expensive though. Bean counters prefer 365 because it's 5.5 times cheaper than 2019.

  11. TomMasz

    I can unplug my network cable and still work. Just sayin'.

    1. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

      So can I. And I'm using 365. Just sayin'.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      "I can unplug my network cable and still work"

      Try that on a thin client!

    3. JohnFen Silver badge

      But it needs to connect to the internet at least once a month, or it goes into a "view only" mode.

    4. bombastic bob Silver badge
      Trollface

      "I can unplug my network cable and still work"

      windows 10 aka 'Win-10-nic' will fix that loophole, eventually

  12. Terry 6 Silver badge

    Price?????

    Two years of subscription (constantly updating yadder yadder) pays for a copy of the standalone version for what counts for perpetuity in computing terms. Or in other words the standalone pays for itself by comparison in a tad over 24 months.

    And I use Office 2010 and LibreOffice at home quite happily. I'm not even sure either of them are giving me anything much more useful than in office 2003 ( or whatever it was called)

    1. mix

      Re: Price?????

      Office 97 was pretty much all you needed if you "had" to buy MS. Everything else since then, most users don't care about.

      1. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

        Re: Price?????

        But Office365 is 200x more ribbony than Office 97.

        1. Jedipadawan

          Re: Price?????

          >"But Office365 is 200x more ribbony than Office 97."

          And the point where I really, really started to hate Office.

      2. Goobertee

        Re: Price?????

        <<Office 97 was pretty much all you needed>>

        Thank you, mix. I've been sitting here trying to remember which it was. Back when the earth was young and I was teaching in a university, I'd tell my students to buy '97 if they had to buy because everything worked. In addition, the Help files were on the local computer, so you didn't have to have an Internet connection to use them, as with later versions.

        That was before I retired and switched to Libre Office.

      3. bombastic bob Silver badge
        Meh

        Re: Price?????

        the ONLY reason I *EVAR* got '97 is because my primary customer (contracting long term) insisted on sending me '.doc' files that '95 could not read. Then I had CLIPPY to deal with...

        Now it's Open or Libre office on ALL platforms, windows or otherwise. Usually otherwise.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Price?????

      When talking about the core office suites, Word, Excel, Publisher then to most parts I'd agree although Excel has got better since the old version - still buggy though.

      However Office 365 does have a great bundle of other applications, most have significant limitations (but the monthly updates help!). Does depend on your licence, but you could replace or not require a number of other systems if you use Office 365.

      For instance, a user could create a form (say a new starter form) and easily add it to a workflow, add an approval step from a line manager and store the result in a database, with very little effort, very little technical expertise and very quickly.

      You could get emails to an on-call user, look up the duty rota and e-mail the on-call engineer all with hardly any configuration.

      You could create a series of essential training videos and alert users that they need to watch them then automatically mark their training records to say they have been watched.

      So for business automation across multiple integrated and third party applications it works really well but only worth it if you want the extra functionality - many won't.

      1. Jack of Shadows Silver badge

        Re: Price?????

        So for business automation across multiple integrated and third party applications it works really well but only worth it if you want the extra functionality - many won't.

        This is exactly the context I'd consider recommending to be one of several for consideration. Otherwise? Not so much.

      2. keithpeter
        Pint

        Re: Price?????

        "For instance, a user could create a form (say a new starter form) and easily add it to a workflow, add an approval step from a line manager and store the result in a database, with very little effort, very little technical expertise and very quickly."

        Random un-audited shadow IT used to capture confidential and personally identifiable information as a feature?

        Good luck everyone.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Price?????

          Random? Un-audited? Shadow IT?

          WTF? It would be a tool supplied by IT so hardly shadow IT. Your staff should be fully aware and trained in GDPR by now so know what information they can hold and you can easily check what is being saved and where.

          The alternative - well many HR departments are still creating manual forms (word forms) or PDF. This information is completely insecure, has no oversight, not ability to audit and can be done by anyone in your organisation today.

  13. Milton Silver badge

    No thanks

    So I could use an expensive office software package that is bursting with arcane functionality of which I routinely use about 3%, and which spies on me and steals my personal data.

    Or I could pay even more for a less featured, slower, less reliable version of that same app, which still spies on me and steals my personal data.

    Or I can just stick with Libre. Free. Always available. Working. Doesn't spy. Doesn't steal my data.

    Oooh, difficult choice.

    Perhaps MS could have warnings before its adverts, like "Ignore this unless you're a clueless corporate monkey"?

    1. Kubla Cant Silver badge

      Re: No thanks

      I too am a long-time Libre Office user.

      But all that is set to change now I've discovered that there is an office suite I can use for listing US state capitals. When I think of the countless times I've been sitting in front of the the screen staring at "Little Rock AR, Sacramento CA..." and wondering what comes next. Not any more!

      1. 's water music Silver badge
        Trollface

        Re: No thanks

        But all that is set to change now I've discovered that there is an office suite I can use for listing US state capitals. When I think of the countless times I've been sitting in front of the the screen staring at "Little Rock AR, Sacramento CA..." and wondering what comes next. Not any more!

        Well you just destroyed 4% of the value right there

      2. bombastic bob Silver badge
        Trollface

        Re: No thanks

        You could get a list of state capitols by watching an Animaniacs cartoon...

  14. chivo243 Silver badge
    Windows

    Paying for vs. using

    OK, I've never personally paid for MS Office, my employer has, I hope ;-} If I had to pay, I wouldn't, and I wouldn't use MS Office. There are plenty of free ones out there.

    Tramp as he probably wouldn't pay either...

  15. andy 103

    If you think this is shit

    "If you think this is shit, try one of our other products!"

    1. BGatez

      Re: If you think this is shit

      IMHO there is NO product MS has bought that they didn't successfully tank in jig time

    2. bombastic bob Silver badge
      Coffee/keyboard

      Re: If you think this is shit

      good one!

  16. Tom 35 Silver badge

    Did they cripple one of the twins the same way they do software when they want you to buy something else?

  17. James 51 Silver badge
    Gimp

    Going to fire up my Amiga 600 and see if Scribble is all that I remember it to be.

    1. Timfy67

      Surely WordWorth was the program of choice on the 'mig

      1. James 51 Silver badge

        Wasn't old enough to have money/buy software then but I do remember having Scribble and being impressed.

      2. Dave559 Bronze badge

        Final Writer was the better Amiga word processor, in my opinion…

        (So much great software that died a death when the Amiga did, sadly. Lightwave is probably one of the few that made it to other platforms and continued…?)

  18. David 155

    Stability

    Dont they realise that some people like stability and dont want updates and features(like bugs) continuously added?

    1. the spectacularly refined chap

      Re: Stability

      Amazon are the worst offender for that: about twelves months ago they changed the unlock process on a Kindle Fire. I forget the details but you had to swipe in a different direction to previously. No explanation of the change, the adverts on screen still there, not even an "this has changed and you'll need to do this now..." on there. Only took a few seconds to figure out but leaves a very nasty taste in the mouth.

    2. Chloe Cresswell

      Re: Stability

      Most common complaint I get from our clients who are on office 365 is "it updated and changed again" *nods*

  19. SonOfDilbert
    Thumb Down

    Perfectly scripted for bigger profits

    A few things came to mind whilst watching all three of their nauseating adverts:

    1. MS chose tasks that Office 365 could perform better than Office 2019 and then expected us to be amazed. Wow.

    2. There is, I am sure, absolutely no technical reason my the "AI" helpers in 365 can't be integrated with Office 2019.

    3. Paying monthly for software that traditionally used to be had for a one-off payment must make them a bucket-load more cash - hence #2, above.

    4. I reckon 90% of what people do in real life with Office 365 could be done perfectly well using Office 2019 or a free alternative - hence these horrible ads.

    5. #1, #2, #3 & #4 make MS just as evil as they ever were.

    1. eldakka Silver badge

      Re: Perfectly scripted for bigger profits

      4. I reckon 90% of what people do in real life with Office 365 could be done perfectly well using Office 2019 or a free alternative - hence these horrible ads.

      90% of what people use Office 365 or Office 2019 for could be done with wordpad+calc that come with windows, don't have to install any extra software (whether free or not) at all.

  20. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    a series of tasks

    My personal series of Office tasks, aka Ofice 2016 forkflow

    1. Open Office (pun semi-intended)

    2. Type type type, snigger at another "offensive" word that MS found and haven't bothered to fix since Offixe XP. Type type type

    3. Save as...

    4. Close (X)

  21. Adair

    As neither of them shit solid gold pearls...

    onto my desk whenever I press a key, i.e. they are just 'Word Processors' that cost money to use and their owner is venal and unreliable, I don't find any good reason to use either of them. I do however have anytime access to trustworthy and reliable means of producing formatted words.

    Somehow my world is unmoved by the lack of either of MS's 'products'.

  22. elgarak1

    Listen up, Microsoft: I get that you notice, and fear, that users are abandoning Office. But squeezing will not keep them in! You cannot push people into a service, much less a subscription service. You can only lure. What you are doing is not luring me, though. Word, the only product I care about, is shit compared to others out there, and your advertised tools are laughable. If you want to lure me back, give me something I want or need! You can't, because you do not (want not) understand what I need or want. You continue to willfully ignore my needs. So no Office for me. No subscription, no money, and no data for you (other cloud services take my data only if I do not pay. If I pay, they do not take my data).

    That's ANY Office. 365 and 2019. The only reason some people chose 2019 over 365 is because they need to exchange files in Office formats only occasionally. Once the entities forcing this will realize that they are better served not with Office file formats, you will loose.

  23. rdhood

    Microsoft office had everything I needed about 15 years ago

    Seriously. Yes, I need Office every now and then. No, I don't need ANY new updates. NOW, which is more expensive?

    1. Bruce Ordway

      Re: Microsoft office had everything I needed about 15 years ago

      I'm still using Office 2003 which I prefer due to the way Access works. In my opinion MS has been trashing Access in each of their subsequent releases.

      Occasionally I will run into "number of rows" limit in Excel.

      Other than Excel I don't find anything appealing about the latest Office offerings from MS.

      1. JohnFen Silver badge

        Re: Microsoft office had everything I needed about 15 years ago

        As an added bonus, 2003 doesn't have that damnable ribbon...

        1. bombastic bob Silver badge
          Unhappy

          Re: Microsoft office had everything I needed about 15 years ago

          worth pointing out, along with Sinofsky, the same person who invented the damnable ribbon also invented 'the Metro' and we're STUCK WITH THAT UI, too...

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julie_Larson-Green

  24. CAPS LOCK Silver badge

    Ms Office in education...

    ...I'm probably being stupid, but why does the money flow TO Microsoft, not FROM Microsoft to the educational establishment for training student to use it? Justaskin'

    1. Marketing Hack Silver badge
      Windows

      Re: Ms Office in education...

      Because MS still has market power in the office productivity arena, and because educational establishments still have money, and that money still looks pretty and forms into attractive piles. It's just that the piles are somewhat smaller than those found at a Fortune 500 company.

  25. Herring`

    Well, one is obviously 1,654 better than the other.

  26. Andalou

    Get Off My Lawn

    Tut and kh. You young'uns and your "ooh, shiny" frippery. Never mind 2019 vs 365. As any fool knows, true Word fans and experts are still using 5.1a in a virtual machine

    1. Alistair Silver badge
      Windows

      Re: Get Off My Lawn

      Ummm. 6.0 doesn't even need a VM. Although it does prefer XP or 7 over 10.

      <And there are certain hospitals still using 6.... to this day>

      /shifty eyes

    2. Updraft102 Silver badge

      Re: Get Off My Lawn

      The last Word version I used was 1.1b, which we used to call "winword" because "MS Word" meant the character-based DOS application. It was one of the few things I actually used Windows 3.0 to do, since everyone knew that real work was done in DOS.

      I found that it did all that I needed a word processor to do, which wasn't a whole lot. Well, printing a ten page document in less than 45 minutes would have been nice, but I suspect that had more to do with the hardware available at the time. I remember waiting anxiously as the dot matrix printer slowly ground out the pages I needed for the uni assignment that was due shortly, having waited 'til the last minute to print.

      How do you keep people buying the same thing over and over when the old one still works? Always the question, with all sorts of answers, none of which benefit the consumer.

  27. JohnFen Silver badge

    If I had to use Office

    If I had to use Office, I'd absolutely go with the native application rather than 365. With a native application, I can make sure that the application doesn't update (and therefore change) underneath me, and can do the update if/when I'm actually ready for it, providing greater stability in terms of usage patterns. Also, I don't need an internet connection, and I am more able to control whether or not the application phones home.

  28. NanoMeter

    WPS Suite

    I have found out it's almost just as good and free.

  29. BGatez

    I just don't have enjough f**k-yous for microsoft

  30. Marketing Hack Silver badge
    Windows

    "one-off cost of Office 2019 versus the ongoing subs of the 365 incarnation."

    I know I am going to slapped by El Reg for not sending this to their corrections email alias, but the correct spelling of the final word in this sentence is I-N-C-A-R-C-E-R-A-T-I-O-N.

    (And yes, I use Libreoffice at home)

  31. Rol Silver badge

    Money to burn

    "Hello. Is that the Greek tourist board?"

    "Yes. How may we help you?"

    "Ah, great. Yes. I'm interested in buying one of your gorgeous islands, and was wondering if you could direct me to the necessary department that deals with such things"

    "I'm sorry, that's a very unusual request, I wouldn't know where to....Hold on! Is this some kind of prank call!?"

    "No. No. I assure you, this is genuine. I'm responsible for maintaining my company's vast array of software resources and the boss has just signed a contract with the local undertaker to license Office 365 throughout our organisation"

    "Sorry. I'm not quite understanding your point"

    "What I mean to say is, my overtime bill from now until I retire will quite literally cover the cost of a modestly sized Mediterranean island"

  32. chartupdate

    Horlicks

    I think the level of confusion exhibited by several commentators here only service to illustrate the complete Horlicks Microsoft has made of its product branding given that "Office 365" is an umbrella term for a series of different and often overlapping products aimed at both consumer and enterprise markets and which provide the end user with differing functionality depending on the package they have purchased. To whit:

    Office 365 is the name of the cheap as chips cloud-based productivity suite of Word Processing, Spreadsheet and Presentation apps running in a browser and which share a user interface and most functionality with the legacy desktop Microsoft Office product.

    Office 365 is also the name of the subscription service which allows the home user to install desktop apps on up to five devices, These apps are fundamentally Microsoft Office but benefit from a regular stream of feature enhancements and updates not immediately available to purchasers of the offline retail version. Purchase ALSO entitles the user to access the cloud based versions of the apps, and if we've been good users and configured our desktops to save to OneDrive then files can be accessed via the cloud on any device. Unless your desktop sync has glitched with an unhelpful error message.

    Office 365 is also the name of the suite of enterprise cloud services which, depending on purchased tier, allow businesses to run filestore, mail and even AD systems in the cloud without recourse to any on-premises hardware. Billed on a per-seat basis it also allows use of the cloud Office apps and installation of desktop apps, unless you are on the cheapest tier in which case you are cloud only and it is no install for you bad customer.

    Clear as mud isn't it? Don't get me started on Skype for Business which is the offering previously (or in certain backwaters of the admin console still is) known as Lync and an entirely different service to the product also called Skype as marketed to the consumer space. Or the fact that higher tier Office 365 (enterprise) customers get to use Sharepoint services for enterprise cloud storage, despite also having access to the enterprise-grade tier of OneDrive which performs largely the same functions on a basic level, just not in a granular Sharepoint-y way.

    All of the above may be wrong as they may have changed stuff since last week.

    1. JohnFen Silver badge

      Re: Horlicks

      That's normal for Microsoft -- they long ago perfected the idea of having numerous licensing options that are so difficult to understand that Microsoft has to provide specialist consultants to help you figure them out.

      It's almost like they're intentionally muddying the waters, hoping that you'll end up with a more expensive license than you really need.

      1. Terry 6 Silver badge

        Re: Horlicks

        One of my favourite is that Office "Home" editions excluded Publisher.

        Now Publisher is an OK DTP product, great for the Church hymn list, Girl Guides programme, auntie Bessie's birthday card and so on. Home and small office use.

        It isn't really a pro product.

        So they don't f+++ing include it for home use.

        Tossers.

        1. Adair

          Re: Publisher

          May I just add a purely personal opinion: 'Publisher' is an abomination.

          Things may have changed, but having one of the most unfriendly file formats on the planet was just one of the reasons I stopped using it years ago.

  33. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    and only braindead "it's how we have always done it" Microsoft shops

    should use Office365 over the vastly more suitable, cheaper and more user friendly GSuite...

  34. GX5000
    Devil

    Darwin Awards

    They should have the Darwin Awards for Security and Privacy....

    These *&^* think we're all going to cluster in SkyNe....er....Azure willingly.

    Think again.

    Not everyone is foolish enough to hand over all of their data on a say so of confidentiality.

    Don't even get me started on that TimeLine feature they're working on.....

  35. Jack of Shadows Silver badge

    And with one tick mark, won't "personalize" the damned menus! I do NOT want to have to look where something is while I'm operating at full speed. Seriously, WTF?

  36. Allan George Dyer Silver badge
    Paris Hilton

    Probably not for me...

    For some reason, in my 30-something years of wordprocessor usage, I have never needed to list US state capitals. But what do I know, perhaps MS Office users are regularly required to complete such tasks, personally, I use Libre Office.

  37. Jedipadawan

    Because I realised Microsoft were going to go all in with subscription only software... my small business - with five operational laptops and two seeking repair when funds allow - is running Linux (KDE) and Libreoffice.

    Single supplier lock in is not normally business savvy but, back in the day, Microsoft were really, really good at ensuring there was no other option.

  38. Nick Gisburne
    Alert

    Office 365 no good in a leap year

    There will be 366 days in 2020. Expect some down time.

  39. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

    "has had a stroking from the cloudy tickle-stick"

    Well played, sir.

  40. cynicist365
    Angel

    Without the hype, how the ad would really have gone...

    User 1: Office 2019

    User 2: Office 365

    1. Fill out a spreadsheet with data about 50 states:

    User 1: Google's list of US states in table format and pastes into spreadsheet, in under one minute. Gets back to work, meets clients, has lunch, goes home, work day done.

    User 2: Goes to perform a dataset on list, oh no, Office 365 is offline. Tries to type by hand, but relying on Microsoft makes you unintelligent, thus lacking knowledge of all US states and abbreviations. Instead, waits for the cloud to resume. Hours pass into call after call. On phone to support, outage expected to last until the end of the day, no work done, boss pissed off, wife leaves due to lack of common-sense and reliance on Microsoft solutions.

    2. Make a half-finished presentation perfect:

    User 1: Outsources the design to their in-house design team because no business-minded individual has time to fuck around with graphics especially with amateurish output like that shit.

    User 2: Whimsically continues to finish presentation file with hours of half-baked inexperienced pre-stamped (and repeated ad nauseum) template fluff that detracts attention from the purpose of the presentation. Response from presentation attendants result is employee getting the sack, due to lack of imagination and recommended employment outlook: a microsoft helpdesk.

    3. Polish a resume and start a job search: Let's do this!

    User 1: Retrieves template of resume from the web in raw text, uses style to define headings, subheadings etc, adjusts text, 10 minutes pass. Refines text making it personable and unique, 15 minutes pass. Document completed, spelling and grammar checked to remove 'z' from every other English spell checker outside of the US, so they don't look like a complete moron if reaching an interview, 20 minutes pass. "Hey, how are you going over there?" Reaches out to prospective employers via other social media, because no one in their right mind would use LinkedIn after the 2016 breach, receives replies from actual companies expressing actual interest and goes to interview. One hour passes. After interview, receives notification that accepted into role, because their resume isn't a stock-standard template they've seen before.

    User 2: Starts to open the document but gets new message notification from LinkedIn about a new opportunity, 10 minutes pass. About to start on 'intelligent workflows', another message received on LinkedIn from old work colleague wanting immediate assistance with job application, 15 minutes pass. Opens Word and gets out pen, Word crashes due to bug, restarts computer, 17 minutes pass. Tries to login, but trust relationship broken between server and client, waits a few minutes while calling IT, 20 minutes pass. Just give me a fucking second will you? (slightly agitated) One hour passes, Office 365 resumed, 'works on intelligent workflow' is done in a few minutes. Looks up and says "Ha, beat you fuck…er…" Office is dark, User 1 has gone home, boss still there, looking on at the exchange. Sacked for incompetence.

    1. mutin

      Re: Without the hype, how the ad would really have gone...

      There is yet another option - LibreOffice freeware. Supports all platforms, great to replace MS Office.

  41. David-M

    Torn to Ribbons...

    It would be most instructive to pit its productivity against a prior version with a menu rather than a ribbon - d

    1. ChrisBedford

      Re: Torn to Ribbons...

      It would be most instructive to pit its productivity against a prior version with a menu rather than a ribbon - d

      OK sure, let's all go back to 2003

    2. Terry 6 Silver badge

      Re: Torn to Ribbons...

      In the pre-ribbon days I could readily adjust the menus to fit my working tasks. Stuff that I'd never use between then and the heat death of the universe was taken out of the menus. Stuff that I'd use in conjunction with items in a different menu, or that seemed to me to be more appropriate ( i.e. where I'd expect them to be) would be put there.

      The Ribbon pile of excrement makes customising the menus far far more difficult. Oh, and they may call it a ribbon, but it's really just a posh name for a particularly annoying way to organise menus, IMO.

      1. Jedipadawan

        Re: Torn to Ribbons...

        And the other thing about the Ribbon, as I pointed out to work colleagues when this 'wonderful innovaton' arrived on our desks, is that it's basically the original CP/M Wordstar menu system.

  42. John Brown (no body) Silver badge
    Joke

    Office 365

    We go MORE than full circle!!

  43. ChrisBedford

    Unfair comparison

    Office Home & Student does not include Outlook. A fairer comparison of prices would be Home & Business, which works out at about 3.5 years instead of the less than 2 years of H&S.

    But all comparisons are only valid if you only have one computer. O365 can be installed on up to five machines in the same household (as well as iPads and phones and Android devices) making it far and away the cheaper option.

  44. ricardian

    Now where did I put that big box with all the Multimate installation diskettes??

    https://winworldpc.com/product/multimate/40

  45. This post has been deleted by its author

  46. Cynical Pie

    What is wrong with the old adage if it ain't broke don't fix it?

    Yes Office can be frustrating at times but I much prefer the 'out of the box' versions such as 2019 (still happily using 2010 at home) rather than the constantly updated (read as 'oh FFS where have the developers moved (insert function of choice) to now?' version that is 365.

    There is also the fact that some users (ie the Boss AKA Mrs Cynical Pie) struggle to use 365 due to the lack of block colours for the tool bars etc. Office 365 may look all clean and modern and shiny but sometimes old school works.

  47. Irnerd

    I must be way out there

    Great banter in the comments here - I almost fell off my chair.

    We try to make cost effective use of modern technology and methods.

    Last month I finally managed to remove all traces of M$ dependency from our IT estate- except a natty SQL Server I use for prototyping nibbles of code for clients.

    Anyone else had much joy with onlyoffice? - I got community edition running using a freenas appliance , using a bhyve VM and ubuntu with MAMP stack, integrated with a nextcloud installation running in a jail on Freenas - - Sound complex? maybe to install - but works pretty well once in. SSL is still a bind - but so it should be -

    Some features of onlyoffice are interesting - such as lack of ISO Date formatting in spreadsheets - but then you realise you can configure the cell as a text data type etc - - but for a quick get up and go browser based office suite it is pretty good

    (we switched to Chronos for user devices - cheaper and easier to maintain than some)

    Having the might of M$ for scale and security is more a a piece of mind. With skills and research, the lesser known kit is flexible and importantly - controllable - once installed - it is possible to close the door on the never ending upgrade path. And minmised downtime.

    Right - strong coffee for next chapter - may throwing a 3-D ball for that 3-D dog

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: I must be way out there

      NeoOffice(*), on the Mac, FTW. Been using it for years - does everything I need.

      (* A port of OpenOffice, I believe)

      1. elgarak1

        Re: I must be way out there

        It was forked from OpenOffice.org before THAT forked into OpenOffice (Apache) and LibreOffice. It's commercial and includes improvements from both nowadays.

        It has some usage improvements closer to other Mac apps. My own criticism of the word processor part I already mentioned for LibreOffice (the crappy style handling workflows and the internal handling of fonts) remain, though.

        Really, on a scale from 1 to 10, the style handling of Word is at -8, LibreOffice/NeoOffice writer is at -10. Nisus Writer is a very solid +9, Mellel +6, the latter just because it has a steeper learning curve. From a functionality viewpoint, Mellel's and LibreOffice's style handling are the most powerful, but Mellel is much much more easy and reliable. Libre's styles could even be much more powerful than Mellel. I wouldn't know, because it's such a pain to use.

  48. Orwell

    LibreOffice and SpiderOak sync for £0.

    Can fit a lot of odf documents into 2GB.

  49. Citizen99

    Frozen in time

    "...aimed at demonstrating that while Office 2019 is frozen in time,...."

    And the problem with that is ... ?

  50. Earth Resident

    The choice is obvious

    If I have to choose between Office 2019 and Office 365, I will choose Libre Office. Especially if M$ switched exclusively to a subscription model.

  51. VulcanV5
    Meh

    Meaningless Microsoft

    The underlying notion of a company pitting one of its products against another is actually quite imaginative, though only if a sensible choice is made. Setting my Office 2000 suite purchased in 1999 against 2019's Office 365, for example, would be silly because even a cursory examination would determine that Office 365 is for the plebs. A more interesting comparison would be between Windows 7 and Windows 10. Of course, if you were a company clever enough to produce, let's say, a Flight Simulator and a Train simulator, a game-play comparison between those two would be even more illuminating. But Microsoft is much too stupid to be that kind of company so it's probably best not to bother at all.

  52. Mark Manderson

    I want a couple of ounces of the skunk MS are clearly smoking, yep sure Office 36.5 is superior..when its available and online....36.5% is the uptime right? :D

    ill stick to pushing 2k19 to the corp, i like availability above 90% to the workforce.

  53. Trollslayer Silver badge
    Facepalm

    Excel 0.365

    Because that's how much functionality there is compared with the real thing.

  54. Couldbe

    From 2013 onwards they've removed a lot of document authoring features from the standalone that are only available via the subscription. Even though I need them to increase my productivity, I'd rather cut off a limb than pay them a subscription - which is essentially protection money.

    After mopping up from an upgrade from win 7 to 10, I have decided I am going to live long enough to see microsoft either go kaput or be swallowed up by another company. Their behaviour over the last 5-10 years gives me hope it will be sooner rather than later...

    1. A.P. Veening

      "I have decided I am going to live long enough to see microsoft either go kaput or be swallowed up by another company. Their behaviour over the last 5-10 years gives me hope it will be sooner rather than later..."

      I strongly suggest you try to survive a bit longer than those 5-10 years, it is much more fun if you can come back to that grave to dance on it every year for a couple of years.

    2. Jedipadawan

      Alas, while I do appreciate your sentiments (I was around when Microsoft were ruthlessly crushing anyone and everyone who dared to even attempt to compete) Microsoft are not dying out making record amounts of money via the cloud.

      However, they are losing traction on the desktop and Office at long last and their monopoly cracking. Open source was the only way to escape Microsoft's clutches and break the monopoly. And it is. Sure, lots of Microsoft loyalists and ignorant - in the literal sense as in just do not know - Windows users but now there are alternatives to Windows and Office that Microsoft cannot crush.

      And I'm running them! Yay.

  55. The Average Joe

    Firestone tire CEO upset with how long tires are lasting

    It seems that people who drive cars and trucks are not wearing out the tires fast enough, this quarter we saw our profits flatline. So we are developing a new tire stategay with Ford, Fiat and General Motors where the tires during the lease are free to replace under normal wear but the person must pay $10 per month to get tire assurance. This will help us get re-offuring income like the iTunes radio subscription, NetFlix or Sirius Satellite radio.

    I promise next quarter our profits will not be flat. We will find new and creative ways to get more profit from these profit centers.

    Sincerely,

    Money Hungry CEO #495

  56. steviebuk Silver badge

    I could only stand half of an advert...

    ...before I stopped watching. It's awful. Advertising agency hipster bullshit again. Although it does remind me of the internal issue of the Macintosh Team against the rest of Apple that Steve Job created back in the day.

  57. elgarak1

    Steve Jobs was right. They have no taste. In a big way.

    Everything on this "Twins" page is tasteless. And I mean everything. The text, the videos, the laughable features, how the links are embedded, the whole concept of saying one of the own products is shit, here'a the nearly identical product that's gold ... Everything.

  58. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Back to the future

    Wait, Office 2019?

    We only installed Office 2016 at home not long ago. It does everything we want it to do, so there is no sane reason to switch to a newer version. There are no fancy new features that we're desperately waiting for Microsoft to add ...

    Given the frequency that Office is actually used in our house, a subscription model such as Office 365 makes no sense at all.

  59. disgruntled yank Silver badge

    Montpelier, Pierre, Bismarck, ...

    There is a twin I work with. Should I ask to give me a list of state capitals before I will take on more of the work she has requested?

  60. mutin

    Yah, but people who want good smart and free software (thanks for keeping it up) use LibreOffice. Compatible and very opened to users. actually, there is no need in any M$ related Office software anymore as LibreOffice exists. I usually give small donation. We need to support our free world.

  61. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Cost effective

    If 90 % of MS office users on use only 10% of MS Office. The place that I work, we replace computers every 8 years. If you were to purchase a copy of Office 365, it would cost approx. $10.per month or $120 or over 8 years $960. Which at the current price of MS Office Home and Business is 3 copies. This cloud crap is just giving Microsoft and continuing stream of revenue.

  62. Ishtiaq
    Pint

    Office97

    Does all I need on a God knows how old computer, running Windows 98se that does not need or get a 'net connection.

    Sorted,

    Cheers… Ishtiaq

  63. sgrier23

    Office365 Vs Office 2019 v LibreOffice 6.2

    Microsoft have always tried to badger its competition, from MS-DOS and Windows 3.1 up to Windows 10 and Office365. It's bizarre that its putting its two top apps against each other. Personally, I prefer on-premises solutions. You know where your data is and if the hardware breaks you need to fix it. That's a Pro and a Con for on Premises.

    I think Microsoft should split up - its got its hands into too many things - Network Operating Systems / Desktop Operating Systems / Office-Productivity Suites / Games machines to name a few. Microsoft should concentrate on Operating Systems, for network and desktop devices, hive off Office to someone else, give the games to Sony or someone, that way they can concentrate on building an operating system that does not need patched 2 weeks after being released.

    In the long run, MS won't do any of this. They will drop everything that is on the desktop and put everything on the cloud, the only software which will reside on your desktop device is a simple application which makes a connection to the MS Cloud as soon as the hardware starts, and everything you do is done on the cloud and all applications are installed there also.

    Is this good for data security? Maybe - Maybe not. It's also bad for your personal data - as the owner of your data - you will have no direct access to it, and even if you delete files, they will still be there somewhere and someone will be able to access your personal data - which you have deleted.

    I don't think so. Give me on-premises all the time, a little bit more hassle but your data is exactly where it should be and not in the hands of some overseas conglomerate.

    Rant over.

  64. elgarak1

    RoboCop

    Whenever MS wants to sell me on an Office 365 subscription, it reminds me of that scene in "RoboCop": "I had a guaranteed military sale with ED 209 - renovation program, spare parts for twenty-five years... Who cares if it worked or not?"

    But, hey, when Word pumps my 100 page/50k word document full of lead, I'm sure it's just a glitch.

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