back to article UK.gov told: If you want public to trust surveillance cam strategy, throw money and manpower at it

The UK government must urgently expand Blighty's surveillance camera rules to cover the NHS, and properly resource the nation's strategy on the rapidly increasing use of cams. Or so said surveillance camera commissioner Tony Porter in his annual report (PDF) published this week, which warned that the use of video surveillance …

  1. steelpillow Silver badge
    Childcatcher

    The elephant in the room

    Smartphone cams owned by members of the public are ubiquitous, and they all feed the global ID/geolocation commercial sausage machine. There is little point in privacy restrictions on fixed cams, that cannot also be enforced on personal mobile devices.

  2. Big John Silver badge

    Panopticon

    So most of the British people are now under surveillance, but the authorities point out there are still cracks in the system where people might do naughty things and not be seen, and they want more funding and rules to tighten the net. Why do I get the impression I'm watching some dystopian SF movie?

    1. Ledswinger Silver badge

      Re: Panopticon

      the authorities point out there are still cracks in the system where people might do naughty things and not be seen, and they want more funding and rules to tighten the net

      You've either not read the article, or you've not understood the article. The request for funding is not for more cameras, but from the bloke who is supposed to provide some framework of governance to the whole surveillance shambles.

      He won't get that funding, because the last thing government and Plod want is to be limited in their ability to record as much of everything as possible, just because they can.

      1. Big John Silver badge

        Re: Panopticon

        So what exactly does he want the extra funding for? To make the system more efficient? Isn't that a lot like more cameras?

        1. Jimmy2Cows

          Re: Panopticon

          To help ensure the Code of Practice is extended to cover all the bodies it should have covered from the outset, in a nationally coordinated and cohesive manner, while ensuring plod and various large public bodies can't take the piss.

          Noble, ambitious, definitely required, but I'm not optimistic for success and even if it ever pans out they'll still take the piss.

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Doesn't sound like Porter

    will be in post for long...

  4. JohnMurray

    Home Office refuses to enforce privacy code on NHS staff using video

    Surveillance camera commissioner’s advice that trusts be required to comply with code to protect patients is rejected

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/jan/18/home-office-refuses-to-enforce-privacy-code-on-nhs-staff-using-video

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    In 2019 you can still be a Thought Criminal.

    Protester wins fight to wipe political activities from police database

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jan/24/john-catt-protester-wins-fight-to-wipe-political-activities-from-police-database

    1. Graham Cobb

      Re: In 2019 you can still be a Thought Criminal.

      About bloody time too!

      Surveillance of people at peaceful protests should not be allowed. And legal political or trade union activity is none of the police's business.

  6. Ken 16 Silver badge
    Big Brother

    I read to the end, expecting a punch line

    But apparently this isn't posted ironically.

    I find it hard to believe this comes from someone working for the public and not someone in (or applying for) a surveillance sales job.

    I'll put in the obligatory Brexit reference since at least some of this would violate privacy regulation within the EU.

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2019