back to article Clone your own Prince Phil, says eBay seller hawking debris left over from royal car crash

A cheeky eBay seller sought to cash in on the love Great Britain bears for everyone's favourite dithering racist royal by attempting to auction debris from the crash Prince Philip was involved in last week. According to the BBC, what appeared to be little more than a pile of shattered glass and plastic fetched an astonishing £ …

  1. MyffyW Silver badge

    Apologies

    I was always brought up to believe one should say "sorry" - except when involved in a motor accident. It is common practice for one to never admit liability and instead leave it to due process. By all means ensure the other party is OK, but keep matters strictly transactional.

    That said, HRH is indeed a racist, imperial hangover...

    1. Mark 85 Silver badge
      Windows

      Re: Apologies

      No apologies are due because HRH always has the right of way. Shouldn't there have been a load of footman running ahead to clear the road and make sure all the peasants were properly off the road and bowing down?

      Over here across the pond, the Secret Service ensures the roads are clear of cars. I would have though that HRH would get the same treatment.

      1. Neil Barnes Silver badge
        Linux

        Re: Apologies

        Be fair. It's not like he owns the roads.

        His wife, on the other hand... she does own the roads. It says so on all the legislation.

      2. rg287

        Re: Apologies

        Over here across the pond, the Secret Service ensures the roads are clear of cars. I would have though that HRH would get the same treatment.

        He does, most of the time. But on this occasion he was just on a toddle around his own estate and most likely just cutting from one part of the estate onto another, via the public road which happens to run through the middle of it. Probably made the journey a thousand times and only spends a couple of minutes off private property.

        It's unlikely that he was popping down to Co-Op unaccompanied to get their tea for the evening or taking himself back to Buck Pal.

        1. sambaynham

          Re: Apologies

          'It's unlikely that he was popping down to Co-Op unaccompanied to get their tea for the evening or taking himself back to Buck Pal.'

          Prince Phillip's a pot-noodle man. HRH is partial to a pepperami.

          1. segillum

            Re: Apologies

            No, no -- he was going for 20 B & H and a few cans of lager.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Apologies

      > That said, HRH is indeed a racist, imperial hangover...

      He was breath-tested at the scene: no alcohol involved so no hangover... ;-)

      1. Dan 55 Silver badge

        Re: Apologies

        After Brexit the UK will be an empire once again, so there'll be no more imperial hangovers, only racist imperial drunks.

        1. BebopWeBop Silver badge

          Re: Apologies

          I've never tried it, but maybe if you stay drunk, the hangover never arrives?

          1. Hans 1 Silver badge
            Pint

            Re: Apologies

            I have, first thing in the morning have ONE pint, there, done, sorted! Better than alka seltzer, you name it ... just have one with your English breakfast.

    3. macjules Silver badge

      Re: Apologies

      I was brought up to never ever apologise or to say anything if involved in a vehicle collision, as it could be taken as an admission of liability. Simply exchange details and insurers, check to see if anyone is injured and needs medical attention and then drive on.

      1. Jamesit
        Happy

        Re: Apologies

        Not in BC (I think the rest of Canada has a similar act)the Apology act allows one to apologize without admitting guilt.

        http://www.bclaws.ca/EPLibraries/bclaws_new/document/ID/freeside/00_06019_01

        "Definitions

        1 In this Act:

        "apology" means an expression of sympathy or regret, a statement that one is sorry or any other words or actions indicating contrition or commiseration, whether or not the words or actions admit or imply an admission of fault in connection with the matter to which the words or actions relate;

        "court" includes a tribunal, an arbitrator and any other person who is acting in a judicial or quasi-judicial capacity.

        Effect of apology on liability

        2 (1) An apology made by or on behalf of a person in connection with any matter

        (a) does not constitute an express or implied admission of fault or liability by the person in connection with that matter,

        (b) does not constitute an acknowledgement of liability in relation to that matter for the purposes of section 24 of the Limitation Act,

        (c) does not, despite any wording to the contrary in any contract of insurance and despite any other enactment, void, impair or otherwise affect any insurance coverage that is available, or that would, but for the apology, be available, to the person in connection with that matter, and

        (d) must not be taken into account in any determination of fault or liability in connection with that matter.

        (2) Despite any other enactment, evidence of an apology made by or on behalf of a person in connection with any matter is not admissible in any court as evidence of the fault or liability of the person in connection with that matter"

        1. Fred Flintstone Gold badge

          Re: Apologies

          Interesting, Canada even regulates apologies? :)

          I actually like that law, promotes civility.

          Thanks, I learned something new.

          1. MonkeyCee Silver badge

            Re: Apologies

            "Interesting, Canada even regulates apologies? :)"

            More that an apology isn't an automatic admission of guilt, but yes, it is quite cute :)

        2. MJB7

          Re: Apologies

          Given this occurred in Norfolk, the relevant jurisdiction is England and Wales. However judges are very unwilling to accept that people saying "Sorry" is an admission of liability (for the same reason that the Canadian legislation was passed). So it's perfectly fine to say sorry if you are involved in an accident.

    4. Jason Bloomberg Silver badge

      Re: Apologies

      I was always brought up to believe one should say "sorry" - except when involved in a motor accident.

      It is entirely possible to say sorry, express sympathies to the other party, even write and send best wishes for recovery and getting over the event, without admitting liability. It may be less appropriate where it's a fatal accident or there are possibilities of criminal charges, but most accidents aren't of that nature.

      What insurance companies don't want is "sorry; I didn't see you there" and the like. That is effectively an admission of responsibility and blame.

      1. DougS Silver badge

        Re: Apologies

        Unless the other party is recording you or there are impartial witnesses (i.e. not people riding with him) to you saying that, what difference would such a statement make? The other person can say "he said sorry I didn't you there" but be unable to prove you made that statement so it won't matter when it comes to determination of fault.

  2. Tigra 07 Silver badge
    Pint

    "Phil hasn't apologised because, well, they're only peasants, aren't they?"

    That line cracked me up. You deserve a drink El Reg!

    1. Wellyboot Silver badge

      Because any chance of a Knighthood for services to journalism just vaporized

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      From what one of the reports seemed to be saying then the reason why no-one had "apologized" to the people involved was that there were questions as to whether anyone from the Prince Philip's side of the were allowed to either obtain the contact details of the other people or if any address details exchanged at the scene of the accident were allowed to be used for any purpose other than reporting the accident and making the claim. After all, a lot of peopel seem to get very exercised about people obtaining personal information for one purpose and then using it for another.

      1. BebopWeBop Silver badge

        Details were exchanged when someone hit my car. Not that I felt like getting in touch there than to deal with insurance.

    3. adam 40
      Paris Hilton

      Whenever I hit a peasant with my car...

      I put it in the boot and a few days later pluck it, stuff it, and roast it.

      Or is that a pheasant? Always getting those two mixed up.

      Maybe Phil should apologise for not stuffing them.....

      < Paris because she's a tasty bird too. >

      1. Tigra 07 Silver badge
        Joke

        Re: adam 40

        As the joke goes: I ate roadkill last week. Delicious! But i still don't know what to do with it's bike!

  3. Robert Carnegie Silver badge

    He's not a bit on the side, he's her husband. And his connection to the British Empire is only by marriage. And do people generally apologise to the other party in a road accident? What would it take to send flowers, the driver's friend is quoted as saying. Well, her address for one thing - which, as the passenger, she presumably wasn't asked for?

    1. Wellyboot Silver badge

      Witness on TV

      did say during the interview that HRH asked about the other cars occupants.

      1. Geoffrey W Silver badge

        Re: Witness on TV

        RE: "did say during the interview that HRH asked about the other cars occupants."

        He probably asked "Did I get the blighters?"

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Witness on TV

          Hahaha - I need more upvotes for this one :).

    2. Ken Moorhouse Silver badge

      Re: And his connection to the British Empire is only by marriage.

      Be careful with that assumption...

      https://www.thoughtco.com/queen-elizabeth-ii-and-prince-philip-3530296

      1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

        Re: And his connection to the British Empire is only by marriage.

        "Be careful with that assumption..."

        Based on that link, Phil only links to the British Empire is through maternal lines, so still only linked by marriage. Through his paternal line, he's more closely linked to Denmark than the UK, and even that's not close at all. Not that I care that much, but I do like facts.

    3. Allan George Dyer Silver badge

      "his connection to the British Empire is only by marriage"

      He chose to serve in the Royal Navy as an officer, so that's another connection.

      1. Neil Barnes Silver badge

        Did he also serve as a rating, or was he considered 'officer class' and thrown straight in?

        1. Aladdin Sane Silver badge

          He attended Dartmouth, so pretty sure his commission was earned.

          1. BebopWeBop Silver badge
            Facepalm

            He did attend Darmouth. That does not imply that his commission was earned or deserved.

        2. Wellyboot Silver badge

          He was at Dartmouth Naval college at the outbreak of war and spent 1940-45 on active service rising from Midshipman to Lieutenant.

    4. GBE

      Only by marriage?

      And his connection to the British Empire is only by marriage.

      His uncle was the last Viceroy of India and the first Governor General of India.

      That sounds awfully imperial to me...

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Only by marriage?

        "That sounds awfully imperial to me..."

        .... sounds more post-imperial to me

        1. MonkeyCee Silver badge

          Re: Only by marriage?

          ".... sounds more post-imperial to me"

          Governor General is still an effective head of state. They get appointed by the Queen, and act as her direct representative. So in India's case, definitely colonial.

          They appoint Prime Ministers and can dismiss them (and aceept their resignations), dissolve parliament and call new elections, refuse a PMs request for an election and refuse to assent to new legislation. They also exercise the Royal Prerogative of Mercy, so seem pretty clearly to be the acting head of state.

          In practise they very rarely exercise any of these powers other than the first.

  4. 2+2=5 Silver badge
    Go

    Caught by surprise

    I find it nicely ironic that Kia's current advertising campaign uses the strapline "The Power to Surprise".

    Certainly looks like Phil was caught by surprise.

    [Icon: traffic sign!]

    1. Rich 11 Silver badge

      Re: Caught by surprise

      I'm still having difficulty believing that a Kia could flip a Land Rover. Those things can usually survive being hit by a charging rhino.

      Ah, wait, it was near Sandringham. Every road in the Land of Soon Under Meltwater is bracketed by drainage ditches.

      1. JetSetJim Silver badge

        Re: Caught by surprise

        He was pulling out at a T junction, and the Kia was barelling down the A road. I suspect it whacked into the rear half of the Land Rover, which would be the lighter end of the vehicle. That probably spun it 180 degrees, maybe the rear wheels sliding to a stop in a soft grass verge on the other side of the road, perhaps digging in and starting the roll at this point in the collision.

        IANACrash Investigator, and not entirely sure it explains the photo used here, but which seems to be the best overview of the crash site around.

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    One would have thought the royal family always use seat belts.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Did Diana's coroner corroborate this?

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        That's almost as cheeky as my comment, fair play good sir. I could go into the conspiracy theories but you know there really isn't any point. I mean if she was pregnant with Dodi's child it makes no difference if a Muslim was in line to the throne. It's not like any of them are racist.

        1. The Oncoming Scorn Silver badge
          Childcatcher

          Here's how the 1701 rules work:

          First: Don't be a Catholic.

          The British Monarch is also the head of the Church of England to which the monarch must convert if not already a member. Except that if you're Catholic, no crown for you.

          Second: Don't be a bastard.

          Sometimes it's good to be the king, but it's never good to be the illegitimate children of the king -- who are out of line for the crown literally from the moment of their conception.

          If you're related to the monarch but are either a Catholic or a bastard or both, the crown has the delightful term 'Naturally Dead' to refer to you and your lack of right to succession.

          Third: Spouses don't count.

          Spouses of Monarchs are known as Royal Consorts. They may be called 'prince' or 'queen' but as far as the crown is concerned, they're not in line for the throne, they're just the matching 23 Chromosomes needed for the creation of the real heir.

          Any sprog from DiDodi would be out of the running on points 1 & 3 at the least.

          1. Richard Parkin

            William the Bastard

            Didn’t stop William the Bastard becoming William 1.

            1. Tom 38 Silver badge

              Re: William the Bastard

              William the Bastard's more usual title is William the Conqueror, which usually can also mean "fuck your rules, here I come".

              1. MonkeyCee Silver badge

                Re: William the Bastard

                "William the Bastard's more usual title is William the Conqueror"

                But only after he done his conquering.

                He also didn't inherit any of his families titles (IIRC) which were in Normandy.

                But yes, the rules of inheritance don't apply if you take the crown at swordpoint.

            2. Marketing Hack Silver badge
              Coat

              Re: William the Bastard

              William found the loophole in the rules mentioned earlier. Namely, that involves having your army smash everyone else on the battlefield. Turns out that whole "bastard" thing goes away once you have your surviving detractors at swordpoint. Go figure!!

              (Mine is the suit of chainmail hanging in the corner.)

            3. Doctor Evil

              Re: William the Bastard

              Also, unless the rules of succession in the 1701 Act of Settlement predate 1701 by quite a bit (and, in fairness, they may), I suspect William wouldn't have been overly troubled about them back in 1066 ...

              1. DougS Silver badge

                Re: William the Bastard

                Especially since "don't be a catholic" would have ruled out pretty much everyone, there not being a church of England at the time...

          2. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            and if they were the only one left?

            1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

              So unlikely as to be nigh on impossible unless you are considering the line of succession after WWIII.

            2. VikiAi Bronze badge
              Alert

              Re: and if they were the only one left?

              I imagine for that to be the case, Britain's population would be decimated (in the Roman sense of the word), and people might have more significant things to worry about!

            3. Aladdin Sane Silver badge

              Have you not seen King Ralph?

          3. Hans 1 Silver badge

            Are Catholics the direct intellectual descendants of the Judea People's Front and the Anglicans of the People's Front of Judea or is it the other way round ? As for Muslims, I thought they came from Judea Popular People's Front. But then again, what do I know ...

  6. mark l 2 Silver badge

    I very much doubt the winning bidder would have paid up even if ebay allowed the auction to run to the end.

    You can bid or buy on ebay as a guest with your Facetube or Googlebook logins these days with no requirements to provide verified ID or bank details before doing so.

    I seem to get around 1 in 20 none paying bidders on ebay that are all guest accounts with zero feedback

  7. This post has been deleted by a moderator

  8. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Re the seatbelts.

    If he was using a seat belt when he crashed, chances are he's a bit sore and bruised now - even to the extent of cracked ribs.

    He may even have a doctor's certificate excusing him.

    Not that he shouldn't be treated like anyone else.

    1. Dave 126 Silver badge

      Yeah, someone I know was recently done for not wearing a seatbelt, I think a hangover from his commercial driving days when delivery vehicle drivers were exempt from having to wear seatbelts. The police caught him using one of their new long range cameras (the news reports suggest it has a range of a mile, and evidently not for catching speeding drivers).

      Still, reminds me of Tina Fey in 30Rock asking a topless Florida woman why she has a black stripe tattooted diagonally from shoulder to hip: " It's so when you're driving topless it looks like you're wearing a seatbelt!"

  9. Antron Argaiv Silver badge
    Happy

    The papers said he has a license

    Pretty big of him, condescending to follow the rules. SHE doesn't have a license. Being queen and all. But I don't think she drives on the public roads. Just a spin around the estate, fast enough to make the passengers grab for the handles. Bonus points if it's someone from Saudi Arabia. Sometimes it's good to be Queen.

    1. Dave 126 Silver badge

      Re: The papers said he has a license

      Well, it is *her* highway. In any case, my grandmother and other people of her age never took driving tests.

      1. RFC822

        Re: The papers said he has a license

        I suspect that I'm younger than your grandmother (I'm certainly much younger than the Queen), and I hold a full, legal UK driving licence without ever having taken a driving test!

    2. Waseem Alkurdi

      Re: The papers said he has a license

      Bonus points if it's someone from Saudi Arabia.

      You've never seen the way Saudi Arabians drive, especially on highways, at least in Saudi Arabia itself.

      Autobahn speeds are probably intercity speeds for them.

      1. Ken 16 Silver badge
        Trollface

        Re: The papers said he has a license

        are they members of the royal family too?

    3. MJB7

      Re: SHE doesn't have a license

      She doesn't now, but I'm pretty sure she would have had one during the war (when she was not the monarch) because she served as a truck mechanic in the Women's Auxiliary Territorial Service. What with the various changes in licensing etc, that original licence would probably have continued to be valid until she was 70.

      Of course, she no longer needs a licence. Not because the roads belong to her, but because technically laws don't apply to her.

  10. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    New Racing title to be released,

    Rally Championship 2019 Duke Phil's Upper Class Twit of The Year Bumper Cars 2019

  11. Gene Cash Silver badge
    Pint

    > Because who doesn't want a shambling Imperial hangover wheezing inappropriate comments over your shoulder?

    I do! I'd buy him a pint and listen to his stories.

    He's not half 1/10th as racist as my grandfather and other relatives.

    1. Wellyboot Silver badge

      First hand accounts of the Mediterranean Naval campaign, priceless.

      1. Dave 126 Silver badge

        I thought he's in bloody good shape for 98 years of age. His views are more likely a product of his environment than his DNA, so would be cloners shouldn't be put off.

        Still, one assumes that he's had had first class healthcare, medical advice and diet through his adult life (he was born on a kitchen table), so it's not just his genes keeping him well. Also, he hadn't had much of a chance to spend long periods sitting down (what with attending hundreds of official engagements every year)- and sitting down is very bad for your health, especially that if your soul e and bowels.

        1. Dave 126 Silver badge

          > especially that if your soul e and bowels.

          Oops, that should read: spine and bowels. There is probably an argument that sitting down is bad for your soul too, but I'm no theologian. I'm no medical researcher either, but they tend to produce reports with more data and explanation of method in them than the theologians do.

        2. Rich 11 Silver badge

          one assumes that he's had had first class healthcare, medical advice and diet through his adult life

          The royal family are believers in homeopathy, another inexcusable holdover from the 19th century. I bet they only use it for minor, time-limited ailments, though, and the rest of the time rely upon the services of expensive private hospitals.

  12. Richard Pennington 1

    I hear that the road in question just made the top of the queue for a reduction in speed limit

    So the A149 road just outside the Sandringham estate in Norfolk could be the first road in the country to have a speed limit by royal appointment.

    1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

      Re: I hear that the road in question just made the top of the queue for a reduction in speed limit

      It was under discussion to reduce the sped limit from 60mph to 50mph and to install average speed cameras before the accident. The council meeting to make the decision was already scheduled for the day after the accident.

  13. Winkypop Silver badge
    Alert

    Toad of Toad Hall

    You there, Footman!

    Another Range Rover!

    This last one has commoner all over it.

  14. Ken Moorhouse Silver badge

    The school I went to had loads of Bastards...

    They were kept on racks in the Engineering workshop.

    Our teacher would take them down from the racks and give us one each to try out. It was hard work - backwords and forwards - the teacher often used to show me how to do it properly.

    1. pintofbitter

      Re: The school I went to had loads of Bastards...

      heheh, too obscure for most!

      1. AIBailey

        Re: The school I went to had loads of Bastards...

        True. I'll file that one away to use later.

    2. Paul Herber

      Re: The school I went to had loads of Bastards...

      That's one for the rank and file ...

    3. ICPurvis47
      Boffin

      Re: The school I went to had loads of Bastards...

      When I was an apprentice, at the Trade School in Harold Hill, near Romford, we all had to take a 4 weeks' course in Basic Fitting before being let loose on any of the lathes, milling machines, etc., etc. in the main building. This involved being taught how to use a file properly, then being given a 1" diameter piece of steel bar about 8" long. We then had to file it perfectly square (I forget the exact dimension), then have it inspected. Next, file it perfectly cylindrical again, and have it inspected. Finally, file a Whitworth thread all along it and present it for the final inspection, which involved having a standard BSW nut screwed all the way from one end to the other. This little "Trade Test" took most of us about a week to accomplish, but some fell by the wayside and never completed the course. We then went on to make other useful bits and bobs, such as the hacksaw frame and the centre finder, both of which I still use daily some 50 years later. I don't know which was the bigger bastard, the file or the instructor!

      1. Ken Moorhouse Silver badge

        Re: Trade School in Harold Hill

        Did the prospectus lure students in by saying that it was anything but boring?

    4. JulieM Silver badge

      Re: The school I went to had loads of Bastards...

      Whereas these days, they give engineering degrees away to people who think "bastard files" are something kept in the Child Support Agency offices .....

  15. Swiss Anton

    Werecorgi

    Was there any corgi* DNA on the roadside debris. The thought of a clone of Phil the Greek with some diminutive dog DNA accidently getting into the mix sounds quite scary.

    (*Corgi, a breed of dwarf dogs favoured by the Queen. It is unknown if Prince Phillip likes these dogs)

    1. Symon Silver badge
      Terminator

      Re: Werecorgi

      No.

      https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/10/26/queens-last-corgi-dies-ending-74-year-connection-breed/

  16. smudge Silver badge
    Stop

    What I'd like to know

    Everyone seems to blame HRH, but I'd like to know what speed you have to do in a Kia to send an armoured Land Rover cartwheeling across the road.

    Maybe the armour makes it less stable?

    1. Tim Greenwood

      Re: What I'd like to know

      What armour ?

      Pretty standard vehicles with no armour, after all this isn't America !

      1. BebopWeBop Silver badge

        Re: What I'd like to know

        It was reported as being armoured - https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/jan/21/prince-philip-should-face-prosecution-if-liable-says-woman-injured-in-crash and many other news outlets.....

    2. Anonymous Coward Silver badge
      Stop

      Re: What I'd like to know

      Not armoured as far as I can see, but the Kia must have been going at a fair lick anyway.

      And that's why you don't apologise - even if his car was in the wrong place, if she was going excessively fast then she needs to apologise to him.

      1. tapemonkey

        Re: What I'd like to know

        You T-Bone someone at 60MPH and it is pretty much irrelavent if their vehicles are armoured or not they are going over.

        We all know Phil the Greek is a doddering old fool whose only use these days is as an advert for Dignitas

      2. Spamfast

        Re: What I'd like to know

        It was an A-road with a 60mph speed limit. She would therefore have been entitled to go at that speed. Her passenger reported that she was doing 50.

        What she was also entilted to do is to expect that a car coming from a side-road would not pull out in front of her.

        As has been pointed out already, at 50 or 60, even a Kia has significant momentum and kinetic energy - easily enough to spin even a heavier car around and perhaps into a ditch where it might flip.

        The police RTA investigation officers are usually able to determine the truth of the matter but we've no reason to doubt the occupants of the Kia just because a member of the bracket-fungus class - sorry, nobility - was in the other vehicle or perhaps because they were women, which seems to be the subtext of several comments here.

        Given his poor judgement in other areas of life, I have serious misgivings about the prince's competence to be behind the wheel on a public road - also corroborated by him being photographed only two days later not wearing a seatbelt.

        Personally, I think everyone should have to get re-certified to drive every five years and that period should reduce if we start to need re-testing after failing the first time round.

  17. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

    Provenance?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      I assume this was the pile of broken glass and wing mirrors that the "BBC Royal Correspondent" stood poignantly beside for abourt 2 days of live reports from the "scene of the accident". As for provenance, to my view the pile of glass and car bits looked too neat and conveniently uncleared away so I was assuming that it was like Damien Day's teddy bear in Drop the Dead Donkey

  18. Velv Silver badge
    Childcatcher

    Nature v Nurture

    Because who doesn't want a shambling Imperial hangover wheezing inappropriate comments over your shoulder?

    Well if ever there was a way to answer the nature/nurture debate it would be a clone of Philip. If it’s purely genetic then you’d expect, well, a clone of the current Philip. Something tells me the nurture would kick in big style brought ou in a different world.

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