back to article Bloke jailed for trying to blow up UK crypto-cash biz after it failed to reset his account password

A 43-year-old fella has been sentenced to six and a half years in prison for attempted murder – after sending a bomb to a British cryptocoin firm over its failure to reset his account password. According to London's Metropolitan Police Counter Terrorism Command, Jermu Michael Salonen, a resident of Gullspång, Sweden, sent a …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    A note to USAian authors

    a cryptocoin firm in London, England

    To the world at large (ie not resident in the USA) London means London, England. Just like Paris means Paris, France. If you need to distinguish them from London, Ohio or Paris, Texas then please do so, but don't assume that the rest of the world is confused about which is the world city and which is the obscure USA town.

    1. diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

      Re: A note to USAian authors

      "don't assume that the rest of the world is confused about which is the world city and which is the obscure USA town."

      If we don't say it's UK/England then we get a load of comments and emails complaining that there's a London, Ontario, or London, France.

      So thanks to you, we can't win either way. I almost want to wish you, and other tedious pendants, a most unhappy weekend.

      C.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: A note to USAian authors

        So thanks to you, we can't win either way. I almost want to wish you, and other tedious pendants, a most unhappy weekend.

        I remember when "biting the hand that feeds it" referred to a lack of reverence for the IT industry, rather than for the eyeballs that pay the staff's salaries.

        1. diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

          Re: Ledswinger

          "I remember when 'biting the hand that feeds it' referred to a lack of reverence for the IT industry, rather than for the eyeballs that pay the staff's salaries."

          I dunno, man. I think you're mistaken. I've been reading the Reg since 1999, and it's always been a bastion of tech eggheads who have no time for tedious pedantic bastards. And it still is.

          C.

      2. Nick Kew Silver badge

        Re: A note to USAian authors

        tedious pendants,

        Yeah, hanging is just so passé.

      3. Anonymous Coward
        Headmaster

        Re: A note to USAian authors

        >tedious pendants ?

        Shirley you mean tedious pedants ?

      4. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: A note to USAian authors

        "If we don't say it's UK/England then we get a load of comments and emails complaining that there's a London, Ontario, or London, France."

        Been to London, Ontario - from London, England. Much preferred the Canadian flavour of London.

        From now on, you could just refer to our (English) London as Bad London? Satisfies both groups then.

    2. jake Silver badge

      Re: A note to USAian authors

      Inferiority complex?

      1. WolfFan Silver badge

        @jake Re: A note to USAian authors

        ITYM 'massive inferiority complex'.

    3. James O'Shea Silver badge

      Re: A note to USAian authors

      "To the world at large (ie not resident in the USA) London means London, England."

      Around here it usually means London, Ontario, The Great White North. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London,_Ontario There's a London in England, too? Is there a a river named 'Thames' running though the one in England, too? Perhaps someone should do something about the copyright violation.

      1. Jeffrey Nonken Silver badge

        Re: A note to USAian authors

        For the record, this benighted colonist (born in Philadelphia... that's in Pennsylvania, USA in case there's any doubt in anybody's mind WHICH Philadelphia I meant) automatically assumes that London means the one in England, Paris means the one in France, Berlin in Germany, and so on unless otherwise specified.

        However, I cannot speak for any of my fellow colonists.

        CinemaSins likes to make fun when movies specify the countries of famous cities.

        1. james_smith

          Re: A note to USAian authors

          Didn't episodes of Dangermouse start with the words "London, England"?

        2. Natalie Gritpants Jr

          Re: A note to USAian authors

          Are you from the Pennsylvania just north of Bath on the A46? Driven through it many times but never wanted to stop as it has an air of decay about it.

        3. disgustedoftunbridgewells Silver badge

          Re: A note to USAian authors

          USA? Is that the one in North America, Earth?

          1. jake Silver badge

            Re: A note to USAian authors

            USA? Why yes, I am Up Stairs in the Attic. It's where I built my office ...

        4. Anonymous Coward
          Pint

          Re: A note to USAian authors

          @Jeffrey Nonken

          "this benighted colonist"

          Is that something akin to a proctologist?

          (OK, I was amused after I first read it as a typo for columnist. I expect you really meant to say colonial, which earns you a virtual pint).

        5. diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

          Re: "CinemaSins likes to make fun when movies specify the countries of famous cities."

          I know, and it drives me bonkers. Anyway fine - we won't spell out countries quite so much.

          C.

      2. phuzz Silver badge
        Facepalm

        Re: A note to USAian authors

        A friend of mine worked as a tour guide while a student in York.

        An American tourist once asked him (with no obvious signs of taking the piss) if York was "named after New York?".

        1. Law

          Re: A note to USAian authors

          "An American tourist once asked him (with no obvious signs of taking the piss) if York was "named after New York?"."

          Had a similar experience at the Wallace monument in Stirling (Scotland!)... they were amazed by it, exclaiming "Wow - all this for a movie?!"

        2. jake Silver badge

          Re: A note to USAian authors

          This Yank workedvolunteered[0] as a tour guide in York during his time in Yorkshire. You wouldn't believe how many British folks asked where "Old York" was ... usually while standing in The Shambles or in the castle or on the wall. Their logic was that they were in York, they knew of New York, so there must be an Old York, right?

          Don't assume the ignorance of tourists only exists in those originating offshore.

          [0] It was part & parcel of the archeological work I lucked into helping out with.

  2. Kaltern

    Boom...

    Besviken Bitter Bloke Bungles Bitcoin Biz Bombing By Bad Bomb Bearer Booking, Banished Behind Bars.

    1. David 132 Silver badge

      Re: Boom...

      Bravo. Bloody brilliant.

    2. jake Silver badge
      Pint

      Re: Boom...

      Bloody brilliant! Brew?

      1. David 132 Silver badge
        Pint

        Re: Boom...

        Bloody brilliant! Brew?

        Beautiful. Bartender! Best bitter!

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    It's a bit extreme for a password reset you can do yourself online. It's also odd the time delay, sent August 2017, arrived November but not opened till March 2018. Surely someone as crazy as this would have attempted a second one. They did get the DNA through Interpol, something we won't be able to do after Brexit. Take from that what you will.

    1. jake Silver badge
      Pint

      "A bit extreme".

      Gets my vote for Understatement of the Month. Have a homebrew.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      They did get the DNA through Interpol, something we won't be able to do after Brexit.

      Why not? Interpol aren't an EU body. And if the EU decide that they will flout international conventions and won't cooperate on cross border crime, they'll soon find that works both ways.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Really? Interpol predates (by a few decades) the EU or EEC any other letter salad the "common market" has re branded itself as.

        Some people really need to get a clue about how the world worked before a bunch of eurocrats decided to hijack a trading bloc in the quest to create a quasi federal state - which wasnt what we voted to join back in the 70's.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Yes but DNA hasn't been in use that long.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pr%C3%BCm_Convention

          It's a little more complicated than that. Europol supply Interpol access More here if you're interested.

          link

          I quote. "The UK could continue to have access to Prüm through the negotiation of an agreement between the EU and the UK on Prüm.", so no we don't fall onto Interpol according to the EU for DNA.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Almost entirely incorrect...

            AC above, you seem to have mis-conflated a bunch of points about DNA.

            1) DNA has been in use in the UK since 1995

            2) The UK has been exchanging DNA data with Interpol for at least the last fifteen years

            3) Interpol/UK relations won't be affected by Brexit (Europol is a different kettle though)

            4) The Prum convention does deal with DNA, inter alia, but is not live yet. This may or may not be affected, depending how negotiations on the "cooperation on criminal justice matters" conclude.

          2. veti Silver badge

            So we're in favour of massive police DNA databases now, are we?

            Sheesh. Every time I start thinking I might want to come back to England, I see something like this.

            1. jake Silver badge

              Every time I see something like this, I ask "Who is 'we', Kemosabe?".

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        International Espionage is a contact sport

        As in, "My contact in the No Such Agency thought you might want to keep an eye on this lad and his mates" - if the EU do decide to cut us out of their intelligence sharing programmes, I'm not really sure who will be inconveniencing who - given that most of their successes come from intelligence we give them, it seems a little counterproductive for them to stop talking to us.

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      It's also odd the time delay, sent August 2017, arrived November but not opened till March 2018.

      That had me wondering as well. I almost wonder if, since the guy opening it didn't open the letter by the normal means (almost as if he knew something)....

      But nah, can't be anything suspect there. Just a weird set of coincidences that it was sent to the wrong address, but months later the right people moved into the address, that it wasn't opened in that time, that it was left behind when the previous occupants moved out, that the previous occupants didn't forward it on to the right address...

      Oh, my salmon is nearly ready. I can smell it frying up nicely!

      1. Francis Boyle Silver badge

        Yes,

        my first thought was this sounds kinda fishy. Then I realised it's not like we dealing with some multinational conglomerate here. So, probably some sort of private arrangement to take over the lease — my brother knows a bloke who knows someone or "this bloke down the pub'.

        Then something goes wrong:

        "Our new place's not ready yet. We need another few months".

        "But we've already given out the new address".

        "Don't worry, we'll bung any letters into the cupboard in the storeroom. If it's urgent they'll use email".

        So six months later someone bothers to check that cupboard in the storeroom. . .

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Yes,

          I'm the AC you're replying to..

          It kinda works but... Unless the bomb itself was kinda small, it'd be in a package (even a courier one) more than a letter. Letter bombs are old, but from what I have seen of them they were still at least the size of a pack of cigarettes. Well, thinner, but larger length x width. And the article does say it was in a "padded envelope". (was also sent via international mail supposedly, missed that first time I read the article!)

          BTW, this was an accounting firm who received the item. They get all sorts of stuff through the mail at times, probably packed in all sorts of ways as well. A padded envelope wouldn't exactly be weird though having the probably detectable shape might've been. Also, an accounting firm would know the importance of either returning or forwarding mis-addressed stuff.

          Lots of people still send stuff through the post, although much much less than used to. Some of that stuff is urgent and some is valuable. I'd say "ignore it at your peril" but obviously in this case that wasn't so.

          And still the question of why it took them so long to get caught up on their packages....

          It may be all in innocence, but it does smell a bit like that meat I forgot to put away from the BBQ last week that spent 3 days in the back yard in the glass covered dish..

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Yes,

            Original poster here.

            Thanks, I'm not the only one that finds this whole story more fishy than a Seafood Bisque.

            They are the accountants for said firm so why didn't they forward the mail? If that's the only contact address then surely they must have forwarded mail before.

            Maybe it's a stitch up because they couldn't get him on the other stuff. We may never know.

            1. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Re: Yes,

              Thanks, I'm not the only one that finds this whole story more fishy than a Seafood Bisque.

              Yup, they could've done things in innocence - many postal depots around the world have stuff that has been there for years, sometimes decades, without being sent on, although usually only found when a block of shelving is removed or old machinery stripped out...

              But in a case like this, it really does stretch the limits of plausibility. It could happen, and I have no proof that it didn't, but the likelihood of all that stuff coming together just right?????????

              I'm getting my full annual dose of Omega-3 just from one whiff of this!

  4. This post has been deleted by its author

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Note to self: always open packages in the middle

    1. Inventor of the Marmite Laser Silver badge

      It could still be the end for you

    2. vtcodger Silver badge

      Note to self: always have someone else open packages in the middle

  6. Nifty

    Who else thinks there's more to this story than meets the eye?

    1. Rich 11 Silver badge
  7. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Correct response

    So, if the going rate for not resetting a password is sending a bomb in the post, what should be the correct response for Windows deleting your files?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Correct response

      I suspect getting hold of the required fissile material may prove almost as much of a challenge as the Microsoft approach to licensing.

      1. The Oncoming Scorn Silver badge
        Mushroom

        Re: Correct response

        ZAPHOD:

        …the building’s being bombed! Who in the galaxy would want to bomb a software company?

        MARVIN:

        It’s customers?

        With apologies to Douglas.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Correct response

          ZAPHOD:

          No, it's the greengrocer's.

          1. ibmalone Silver badge
            Coat

            Re: Correct response

            No, it's the greengrocer's.

            ITYM "No, its' the greengrocer's."

            IGMC

  8. Pen-y-gors Silver badge

    Counter Terrorism Command?

    I appreciate that language and the meaning thereof can change over time. But surely trying to kill someone in a business quarrel isn't terrorism? Terrorism is about attempting to create terror for political purposes, frequently involving violence. But violence != terror. Or have they just bundled bombs 'n white powder 'n stuff in with the Terror-plods for pay-and-rations convenience?

    1. Alister Silver badge

      Re: Counter Terrorism Command?

      I would suppose that the necessary skills for dealing with bomb attacks fall most easily under the counter terrorism umbrella, rather than any other branch of the law enforcement services.

      1. jake Silver badge

        Re: Counter Terrorism Command?

        "I would suppose that the necessary skills for dealing with bomb attacks fall most easily under the counter terrorism umbrella, rather than any other branch of the law enforcement services."

        Every major city that I am aware of (and quite a few minor ones!) has had a Bomb Squad a lot longer than the current fad of calling anybody who sneezes at the wrong time a "terrorist" has existed.

        1. Alister Silver badge

          Re: Counter Terrorism Command?

          @jake

          Every major city that I am aware of (and quite a few minor ones!) has had a Bomb Squad a lot longer than the current fad of calling anybody who sneezes at the wrong time a "terrorist" has existed.

          That may be the case in the US, but it's not in the UK.

          Most bomb disposal teams are provided by the armed forces. Individual Police services are unlikely to have EOD abilities, with the exception maybe of the Met.

    2. Pascal Monett Silver badge

      Re: surely trying to kill someone in a business quarrel isn't terrorism?

      When the police are alerted to a bomb threat, do you really think that they assume it's not a terrorist ? What reason would they have to do that ?

      Knowing how to make a functional, deadly bomb is not something that is common. Hell, actual terrorists have been known to foul it up. So when you do discover a bomb somewhere, your first thought is certainly not "oh, this is just from some bloke who didn't like how the helldesk drone handled his call".

      A bomb is terrorism, it is not just violence. Frankly, I think he got off light. He has the skills, and lacks the restraint. I'd have sent him down for the maximum.

      1. Teiwaz Silver badge

        Re: surely trying to kill someone in a business quarrel isn't terrorism?

        When the police are alerted to a bomb threat, do you really think that they assume it's not a terrorist ? What reason would they have to do that ?

        While I understand where you are coming from, I think you've fallen into an assumption trap that's very the key point of the issue.

        That a Bomb in a letter = terrorism

        Could as easily be an attempt at a targeted assassination.

        While a phone call, even to threaten or claim to have placed a bomb or random member of the public finding one in a bag at a public place could clearly be an attempt to sow terror, rigging one to specifically or attempt to specifically exact retribution by death or maiming is another.

        I'm not saying either is at all justified, but blurring the distinction or assumptions due to current popular fears is not helpful.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: surely trying to kill someone in a business quarrel isn't terrorism?

        Knowing how to make a functional, deadly bomb is not something that is common. Hell, actual terrorists have been known to foul it up.

        Actually, with limited electrical knowledge, it's pretty easy to make all sorts of IEDS. In the cabinet in the garage I have enough bits, tools and "chemicals" to make some interesting explosive devices that while low-yield will be enough to kill anyone close to it, perhaps kill others (eg something that knocks out a car's brakes at a certain speed - fairly easy to do these days with little thought and gadgetry[1]). All you have to do is trigger a switch at the right time, and that switch can then do all sorts of things that can result in death.

        An explosive doesn't have to be big to kill. I could probably generate enough force with a single stroke from a bicycle pump to propel an item hard enough to kill someone IF it hits them in the right place, is sharp enough etc. Most people know how to make things ignite and 'explode', and it takes little thought to come up with something small but effective. Many people however go for more complex ideas that require a large number of moving parts or electronics, to be sure they get the person they're after. [2]

        A bomb is terrorism, it is not just violence.

        No. A bomb is not terrorism, though it may be used by terrorists as part of their plots. However, equating bombs with terrorism could in itself be a form of terrorism, as you're promoting a view that makes people more afraid (ie more 'terrorised') of the world around them and when every little attempt at murder, sabotage etc is called 'an act of terror,' that increases the sense that 'terror is everywhere' and the world is not generally safe. That is what terrorism is; causing people to be afraid.

        Use the term as it should be used, don't weaken it by equating some brat having a hissy fit with a group who would rather maim your kids then let you have a peaceful life. By mis-using such words you rob the world of some of its peace.

        [1] I was going to suggest something that I have the parts for already (except the actual payload) in generic devices and components (eg relays and electrical wire), but realised that such a comment could fall under "publishing information of interest to terrorists" or somesuch, at which time it could actually be a crime.

        [2] For the record, my thoughts come from experience, and my experience involves working with volatile chemicals and compounds and having to know the 5 ways NOT to cause accidental ignition, vs the million ways that guarantee ignition.

        1. WolfFan Silver badge

          Re: surely trying to kill someone in a business quarrel isn't terrorism?

          Every time I see 'suspect had bomb-making materials' I sigh.

          I have, right now, in my house, the following:

          gasoline/petrol

          kerosene

          foam packing stuff

          cooking oil (coconut derived)

          cooking oil (olive derived)

          cooking oil (other)

          potassium permanganate

          sulfuric acid

          nitric acid

          laundry soap (powder)

          laundry soap (liquid)

          fertiliser (several types)

          ammonia

          iodine

          high-quality paper

          hand soap (bar)

          hand soap (liquid)

          chlorine bleach

          a large assortment of insecticides and herbicides

          I can, with only a little effort and some glassware, make the following items using the above:

          nitrocellulose

          nitroglycerin

          TNT

          napalm

          several different plastic explosives

          at least three different nerve agents

          mustard gas

          phosgene

          and more. Making a bomb would merely require packing some explosive into a container with/without extras to generate fragmentation, plus a timer (a clock or a watch; I've got those, too) or a remote detonator (a cell phone; those could be set to alarm and function as timers, too). Most of the explosive creation methods would be easily in the reach of anyone who has passed high school chemistry. Making sarin or napalm or nitroglycerin is easy, and making TNT or plastic explosives isn't that hard. Look up PETN and/or RDX. (Bad idea if you're actually intending to blow something up, unless you use someone else's account to do the looking up.) (PETN is derived from 19th century chemistry; it's trivial to make today.)

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: surely trying to kill someone in a business quarrel isn't terrorism?

            Every time I see 'suspect had bomb-making materials' I sigh.

            I have, right now, in my house, the following:

            Ok, you got me... I'm the AC who backed away because of worried about "interest to terrorists".

            On the electronics side, for a semi-remote detonator. A small GPS unit, mounted to the car with double sided tape or magnets. The audio output goes to a relay or other electronic switching device. Using custom sound files, you can cause the switch to be triggered with a number of events.[1]

            I'm sure bluetooth pairing could also have interesting uses.

            [1] Thoughts here come from building circuits that need to take a very small very short duration pulse and switch a much larger circuit, while using as few electronic components as possible

      3. A.P. Veening

        Re: surely trying to kill someone in a business quarrel isn't terrorism?

        "I'd have sent him down for the maximum."

        That is exactly what the Swedish judge did, that maximum isn't that high (yet) in peaceful Sweden.

      4. jake Silver badge

        Re: surely trying to kill someone in a business quarrel isn't terrorism?

        "Knowing how to make a functional, deadly bomb is not something that is common."

        Not common to know how? Maybe in your nanny state, but not mine ... I just asked the 16 adults currently on the property. All know how. Fortunately, all are sane and will not. I've made and used ANFO (for stump blasting, quite legal). Most of us have set off fireworks. Ever mix vinegar and baking soda? Etc.

        Seriously, it's not rocket science. Literally ... rocket science involves making it NOT blow up!

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: surely trying to kill someone in a business quarrel isn't terrorism?

          Dammit Jake, stop posting stuff I agree with!

          I must find some stumps to remove. I haven't played with fun toys since I was a kid on a farm! Thanks for the memories! :)

          Maybe city folks with office jobs and severely over-protected childhoods didn't have the same fun growing up we of a more rural persuasion did. Maybe the closest they came to chemistry was perfecting the output of the coffee maker whereas some of us were perfecting safe changes of states of matter (like from solid wood to vapour/powder in 'one all-consuming pillar of fire').

          Perhaps city folk just don't get it, how easy it is to make things go boom from stuff you have lying around the house. A can of fly spray and an electric heater with a timer would probably suffice for a demonstration.....

      5. jake Silver badge

        Re: surely trying to kill someone in a business quarrel isn't terrorism?

        "A bomb is terrorism, it is not just violence."

        No, it's not. It's only terrorism when used to terrorize. Otherwise it's just another tool in the box, albeit a slightly more powerful tool than the average screwdriver.

      6. jake Silver badge

        Re: surely trying to kill someone in a business quarrel isn't terrorism?

        "When the police are alerted to a bomb threat, do you really think that they assume it's not a terrorist ? What reason would they have to do that ?"

        Because most calls to the Bomb Squad have absolutely nothing to do with so-called "terrorists", that's why. They are called for everything from old, unknown chemicals found in an abandoned barn or warehouse to finding a "practice grenade" in the kit of deceased Uncle Bob to a blasting company finding a box of weeping dynamite to school kids calling in a bomb threat to get out of exams to leaky propane tanks to fuel spills. Basically anything that might, conceivably, explode justifies calling them out. Such calls happen quite regularly in most jurisdictions.

        1. DropBear Silver badge

          Re: surely trying to kill someone in a business quarrel isn't terrorism?

          @jake you left out the one of probably zero relevance to you, but chart-topper for a lot of us here in the Old World - someone digging up yet another late complimentary gift from World War II. It's the only occasion I remember repeatedly reading about in the news, involving the bomb squad (that isn't a suspicious bag discovered somewhere).

    3. Teiwaz Silver badge

      Re: Counter Terrorism Command?

      Or have they just bundled bombs 'n white powder 'n stuff in with the Terror-plods for pay-and-rations convenience?

      Basically, yes.

      Doesn't matter if it doesn't quite fit the profile or intent - 'terror' might get a stiffer sentence, more a pat on the back (or head) to plod.

      It's as if they think no one will thank them for catching a random nutcase whose thought processes have gone off the rails it has to be an 'international conspiracy' even if that is a conspiracy of one nutter who happens to live abroad.

      Given the chance, some uniformed bod will try to push the more surveillance donation plate on the back of this on any convenient cue in order to further an Orwellian agenda.

  9. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    sent a functional explosive device in a padded envelope

    ... expecting a refund in return?!

    p.s. yeah, yeah, I know, it blew in his face, aka misfired, whateva!

  10. regbadgerer

    Which is the nutter?

    It says a lot about the modern world that I read this story, and couldn't help but think that of the two, the nutter was the person who opened the envelope from the middle. Bomb makers seem to be so commonplace that they hardly count as nutters any more.

    And on the subject of opening an envelope from the middle - who does that!? How do you even do that without ripping the contents...?

    1. jake Silver badge

      Re: Which is the nutter?

      Ask AvE ...

  11. Nick Sticks

    You should see what he did....

    .... to the company who delivered his pizza late.

  12. Boohoo4u

    Names

    More than one London and Paris?

    Next you cheeky bastards are going to tell me there is more than one Main Street...

  13. adam payne Silver badge

    "Salonen seemingly made and sent a device that had the capability to seriously harm and even kill over something as inconsequential as a change of password.

    I've know a fair number of inpatient people that would get pissy about the security policies surrounding password resets but yikes!

    1. jake Silver badge

      "I've know a fair number of inpatient people that would get pissy about the security policies surrounding password resets but yikes!"

      Good thing they were inpatients, then. I'd hate for them to be out and about on their own if something that small can set them off.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      I gotta ask.. Did you actually mean to type "inpatient" (as in the patients in the nut house, or those who should be), or did you mean impatient?

      Either way works well :)

  14. RedCardinal

    >>A 43-year-old fella

    Not a geezer then? I'm disappointed...

  15. Prst. V.Jeltz Silver badge
    Trollface

    Typical Crypto currency customer .....

    Thats why they gone as far as actually suggesting other customers dont send bombs on their site.

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