back to article Irish fella accused of being Silk Road admin 'Libertas' hauled to US

US prosecutors have extradited an Irish man to America, where he will face charges of allegedly overseeing the infamous Silk Road drugs e-souk. The US Attorney for the Southern District of New York said that 30-year-old Gary Davis, who went by the handle Libertas on the underground cyber-bazaar, is accused of conspiracy to …

  1. Chris G Silver badge

    So crime doesn't pay!

    If that's all he got paid, he wasn't doing anything that important, an honest plumber does way better than that.

    1. gotes

      Re: So crime doesn't pay!

      The statement Davis received a weekly salary from Ulbricht that, over the course of a year, would have fallen between $50,000 and $75,000 is rather ambiguous.

      I assumed that he was receiving 50-75k a week rather than per year, otherwise it's a rather underwhelming salary considering the risk involved.

  2. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    And people said Julian was being paranoid

    Extradition to the US really does mean they won't let you go.

    1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

      Re: And people said Julian was being paranoid

      "Extradition to the US"

      Remind me again, what was the date on Julian's US extradition warrant?

  3. Maelstorm Bronze badge
    Mushroom

    Extraditing random people?

    I'm not familiar with the Silk Road case, other than the fact that it was on the dark web. Where was the server located? If it was not located in the US, then what authority is the US claiming to have for his extradition?

    It is beginning to sound like if a citizen in another country violates US laws, then the US wants to throw them in jail, even if it's legal where that person is.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Extraditing random people?

      That's where you are wrong Mr Liberal-pants.

      There are no other countries.

      - Billy Bob

      [joke]

    2. MonkeyCee Silver badge

      Re: Extraditing random people?

      "It is beginning to sound like if a citizen in another country violates US laws, then the US wants to throw them in jail, even if it's legal where that person is."

      Technically the thing would be "not illegal" rather than "legal", since that is the way that common law works. Generally speaking everything is not illegal unless a law makes it illegal. If a law specifically makes an otherwise illegal thing legal, then it's more accurate to refer to it as legal.

      So a valid claim of self defense can make an otherwise illegal act (homicide) into a legal one.

      As for the content of your post, uh, yeah. That's how it works, America World Police Fuck Yeah. Although they mostly go after people for serious enough crimes who are in allied* countries who tend to align their legislation. I'm pretty sure drug dealing is illegal in Eire.

      The Kim DotCom case (extradition from NZ to US) is a bit more applicable, as the crime for which Kim is charged with doesn't exist in NZ law.

      "what authority is the US claiming to have for his extradition?"

      Being part of a criminal conspiracy I expect. If that same conspiracy shifted drugs across US borders, then they have a legitimate sounding case.

      * for now, give DJT time

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Also if anything touches US banks...

        The US also claims territorially if anything touches US banks or US financial institutions. I recall thats what the FIFA issues were (but I could be wrong).

        Basically the US view is that the world is their legal playpen and they can do whatever they like but fuck you if you want to get anybody out of America. Oh no!, thats wrong.

        I am struggling to work out if the sys admin was only being paid $70K per week or per year. Surely thats per week, you can get more than that being a sysadmin in a normal company.

        1. Halfmad

          Re: Also if anything touches US banks...

          It's an estimated salary per year based on what he was getting per week.

          Really depends what he was having to do, if it was just tidy up the forum posts and ban users then I'd see that as pretty easy going.. sounds like he was up to his neck in it though.

        2. rmason Silver badge

          Re: Also if anything touches US banks...

          I don't think sysadmin falls anywhere near what the guy did.

          Think forum moderator.

          Still would be nice to get the moolah clarified. honestly it probably is 50k/year.

          I doubt he was fixing VMs, He was settling squabbles about the quality of drugs delivered etc.

      2. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

        Re: Extraditing random people?

        Technically the thing would be "not illegal" rather than "legal", since that is the way that common law works.

        Sort of. But stuff can also be illegal under common law. Murder was never legal even in the absence of statute law.

    3. Aodhhan Bronze badge

      Re: Extraditing random people?

      Look... instead of looking silly, why don't you take 3 minutes and use Google on the phone which is obviously stuck 10 inches from your eyes. What makes idiots comment about something they admittedly don't know anything about?

      It's not about where a 'server' is (good grief... really, you think it's about the server?) It's about where the crime is committed/damage takes place.

    4. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Extraditing random people?

      Where was the server located? If it was not located in the US, then what authority is the US claiming to have for his extradition?

      It is beginning to sound like if a citizen in another country violates US laws, then the US wants to throw them in jail, even if it's legal where that person is.

      Ahem gdpr, according to gdpr it does not matter were the serve is located. So what's the diff

      1. rmason Silver badge

        Re: Extraditing random people?

        It's quite simple. It's nothing to do with where things are hosted etc. It was a drug deal.

        They ordered drugs from abroad and had them delivered to the US. Sting buys basically.

        From that point 'they' are drug dealers and have committed a crime in the US (facilitating the sale of drugs there).

        The bloke in question works for that organisation in some way. That's it. No matter where servers or sites are hosted.

  4. not_my_real_name

    Justice for all

    "Thanks to our partner agencies here and abroad, Davis now faces justice in an American court."

    Unfortuantely for Davis he actually now faces some perverse abstraction of justice where the party that can afford the best legal representation wins.

  5. Toilet Duk

    Yeah, that'll teach him. How dare he undercut the CIA's profit margins by dealing drugs?

    The country which has killed, maimed and displaced millions of people in the Middle East regards everyone in the world as subject to its laws and our subservient governments acquiesce. Good luck getting an American extradited though.

    1. Justice

      Undercut???

      You mean most of the sellers on the Dark Net AREN'T CIA outlets?

  6. mhenriday
    FAIL

    US prosecutors have extradited an Irish man to America, where he will face charges of allegedly overseeing the infamous Silk Road drugs e-souk.
    What I like about the Reg is that on occasion it cuts to the quick , while the Irish authorities may claim not to see it that way, the description above is accurate. As we all know, the US enjoys universal jurisdiction....
    Davis has been held in Ireland since his 2014 arrest by authorities there. Having now been extradited, his next stop will be in the Manhattan Federal Court to face trial.
    In the event
    helping to run [...] a secret online marketplace for illegal drugs, hacking services, and an assortment of other criminal activities
    constitutes a crime under Irish law - and I find it difficult to believe that it does not, but piously hope that some more knowledgeable reader here will disabuse me if I am in error - why wasn't Mr Davis tried and if found guilty, sentenced in Ireland ? Under the Atlanticist disposition, must all European countries (and the UK, which seems to be unsure of its status) constantly be demonstrating their fealty to the liege lord in Washington ?...

    Henri

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