back to article Swiss cops will 'tolerate' World Cup rabble-rousers – for 60 minutes

A Swiss police force has decreed that up to an hour of car-horn beeping during the football World Cup will be officially tolerated by the famously pernickety nation. Senior officers in the canton of Vaud have said they will tolerate car horn beeping for up to an hour after World Cup matches so fans can express their “joy or …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Question

    How do the Swiss feel about rugby?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Question

      Rugby is not followed much in Switzerland.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        'Rugby is not followed much in Switzerland'

        Its not allowed, didn't you read the signs? Seriously... I read the PDF and it seemed quite reasonably and fair to me (more caring & less gestapo-esque). But then again I live in a place where noise is a killer on quality of life. Think glasshouse / marble everywhere in long hellish echoey-halls.

        Neighbors routinely start 1-2 month renovations without warning with drilling that goes right into your spinal cord. Everyone has barking dogs 24/7 and 5 am parties are common. So hey, nice to see there's an alternate reality. But I wonder how many fellow Reg'ers can ever afford to live there?!!!

        1. DougS Silver badge
          Devil

          Re: 'Rugby is not followed much in Switzerland'

          Everyone has barking dogs 24/7 and 5 am parties are common

          If the dogs are all barking 24/7, I'm pretty sure they're getting into the "party favors" of those 5am ragers!

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: 'Rugby is not followed much in Switzerland'

            If the dogs are all barking 24/7, I'm pretty sure they're getting into the "party favors" of those 5am ragers!

            Not at all, they're those fucking awful yapping rat dogs that just go "yapapyapyapapyapyapapyapyapapyapyapapyapyapapyapyapapyap yapapyapyapapyapyapapyapyapapyap yapapyapyapapyapyapapyap. yapapyapyapapyapyapapyap..."

            forever. And particularly on a pleasant afternoon when you'd like to relax in the garden with a glass of beer listening to nothing more disturbing than bird song.

            Bastard, horrible little things, unable to go "WOOF", the sort of horrible runty little animals that try and bite people's heels. Jack Russells, I HATE them. Join me, commentards, on my noble quest, sign up, contribute, become a member of CARD, the Campaign Against Rubbish Dogs.

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            A thirty pound a month agreement could have moped hoodlums snatch and drown eight small yappy dogs each and every month.

            A one off £1,100 payment buys you life membership of CARD, sponsors the training of four large, respectable dogs to eat small ones, includes a CARD car radiator badge, and the "hints and tips" book for running over small dogs, and connects you with our Illuminati network of small yappy dog haters. Special offer: Sign up now, and get a pair of cufflinks depicting a Maltese Terrier crushed by a steamroller!

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    2. Korev Silver badge

      Re: Question

      How do the Swiss feel about rugby?

      There are a few teams around, but is a minority sport. It seems more common in the French-speaking areas though.

  2. Cereberus

    Being sensible

    Personally I think this is just the Swiss applying sensible precautions. It seems to me that they are saying that people can celebrate or commiserate but try not to make it go on too long so it upsets other people, and so they have decided on a time limit for use of horns and a request not to interfere with traffic flow if possible. Any time limit could be said to be too short or too long so they have tried to pick a reasonable length.

    On another point they don't say you can't cut your lawn on a Sunday, they say you can't between the hours of 20:00 and 08:00 on a Sunday or public holiday, which is reasonable to allow people to enjoy a lie in without being disturbed by someone insane enough to want to cut the grass when they get home from a back shift at 02:00 in the morning.

    The bath one is a little strange but taken into context with it's counterpart example suggests that water pipes can be quite noisy and not to take a bath at night (which I would assume does not refer to the evening) so that additional noise from water pipes occurs.

    1. ArrZarr Silver badge

      Re: Being sensible

      The whole document made me very glad I don't live in Switzerland. Why is it the Government's place to dictate how you live your life?*

      However, it says that "admissible" noise specifies Mowing the lawn between 08:00 and 22:00 on working days rather than any day and explicitly says no to noisy DIY on Sundays and Bank Holidays.

      On the other hand, I do like the dig at people who have their music on far too loud calling out that volume isn't the same thing as quality. I'm sure many card carrying members of the audiophile community would take issue with that statement with their silver/gold/platinum solid/coated power cables.

      *Although this could be extended to the British Government too

      1. Dan 55 Silver badge

        Re: Being sensible

        Why is it the Government's place to dictate how you live your life?

        Because in Switzerland it's a direct democracy?

        Still, when your neighbours are all there watching their tellies in the garden and every goal is met with fireworks, airhorns, and vuvuzelas, I'm sure you'll be the first one to enjoy it.

        1. Robert Helpmann?? Silver badge
          Joke

          Re: Being sensible

          Because in Switzerland it's a direct democracy?

          So mob rule, but being Swiss, it is a very sensible mob.

          1. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge

            Re: Being sensible

            but being Swiss, it is a very sensible mob.

            Do men still vote by waving their swords?

            1. Jamie Jones Silver badge

              Re: Being sensible

              My current flat was built to sound studio soundproofing standards, and it's a godsend... especially compared to some places I've lived.

              It really changes the quality of life. The only thing I hear is the traffic if the windows are open. It's also nice to be able to put the washing machine or loud music on at 5.00am if necessary, without worrying about disturbing anyone.

              I understand building regulations for sound-proofing in new builds is much stricter now.. It should be like it is here - people would be far happier!

            2. Pedigree-Pete
              Joke

              Re: Waving swords...

              Oh! Matron.... (sorry, just came from the "MSDN Nob innuendo thread, couldn't resist). PP

              >> No "Carry on..." icon.

      2. Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese Silver badge

        Re: Being sensible

        explicitly says no to noisy DIY on Sundays and Bank Holidays

        You say that like it's a bad thing - for me that's the dream scenario.

        "I'd be more than happy to put those shelves up dear, but I'm afraid it's illegal. I just couldn't take the risk."

      3. ArrZarr Silver badge
        Big Brother

        Re: Being sensible

        People seem to get the wrong idea about my first post. I'm not advocating for the entire population of a city to get blind drunk and have city-spanning football chants, I'm arguing against government regulation of what I do in my own house.

        I may not agree with those who would cause all this noise, but I will fight for their right to cause it as long as it doesn't go too far. The fact that the Swiss felt the need to legislate what is too far is what's getting my goat.

        I live next to a church. If I fancy an early night on a Tuesday, it's impossible due to the campanologists practicing, but that is their right and their hobby so I would never dream complain.

        1. Shades

          Re: Being sensible

          "I live next to a church. If I fancy an early night on a Tuesday, it's impossible due to the campanologists practicing, but that is their right and their hobby so I would never dream complain."

          I'm going to hazard a guess and say the church was there long before you moved next door? Churches often have bells and bell ringers need to practice. I'd argue that, unless they're practicing every day for hours or at night, you have very little right to complain. I also extend this argument to the cretins who move close to existing nightclubs or live music venues then complain about the noise*.

          * I know people who had very successful late night entertainment businesses but had to permanently close them because the idiotic local council gave planning permission for new housing developments nearby and then the equally idiotic new residents complained to the council about the businesses who were then forced to shut. So well done to the residents for denying local job creators their, and their employees, right to earn a living <slow hand clap>.

          1. Mark 85 Silver badge

            @Shades -- Re: Being sensible

            I'd like to add the morons who move to an area around an airport. particularly off other end of the runway(s). They know the airport is there, a look at map would confirm it. But usually a week after they move in, the bitching starts.

            Same for the ones that move next to an auto racetrack.

            1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

              Re: @Shades -- Being sensible

              "I'd like to add the morons who move to an area around an airport. particularly off other end of the runway(s). They know the airport is there, a look at map would confirm it. But usually a week after they move in, the bitching starts."

              We had the same issues with a local cokeworks. It was built by a German company and was used (it's documented!) as a waypoint for Zeppelins during WWI. The locals were constantly complaining about the dust from the place. The oldest houses in range of the normal day to day dust levels were built in the 1930's but the loudest complaints came for the newer house built in the 80's that included a number of 4 and 5 bed houses, ie a more "well off" housing estate.

              Is there a word for NIMBYs who move into an area and then complain about what was there before them?

        2. rcp27

          Re: Being sensible

          “I'm arguing against government regulation of what I do in my own house.”

          The majority of people in Switzerland live in flats, so neighbour noise is a very significant potential cause for friction. Your freedom to make noise infringes on your neighbour’s freedom to enjoy peace and quiet. The rules on quiet time mean there are times when you are free to make noise even if it pisses off your neighbours, and other times when your neighbour gets to enjoy quiet even if it pisses you off.

          “I may not agree with those who would cause all this noise, but I will fight for their right to cause it as long as it doesn't go too far. The fact that the Swiss felt the need to legislate what is too far is what's getting my goat.”

          The thing about Switzerland is it has a very strong direct democracy system. These rules don’t come from some council sitting in a smoke filled room, they come from the people. If someone doesn’t like the rules and wants different ones (including no rules), there is an open and straightforward system for them to raise an initiative, gather support and, if sufficient support is forthcoming (in the form of signatures on a petition), put it to a referendum (at local, canton or federal level, as appropriate).

          “I live next to a church. If I fancy an early night on a Tuesday, it's impossible due to the campanologists practicing, but that is their right and their hobby so I would never dream complain.”

          I live, in Switzerland, next to a church, and the Swiss love their church bells. Thankfully the church is subject to the same rules about quiet time as everyone else. During “quiet time” the church bells stop, just like everyone else’s noise. They are free to jangle their bells during the noisy time, and I am free to sleep without disturbance during quiet time.

        3. MonkeyCee Silver badge

          Re: Being sensible

          "I'm arguing against government regulation of what I do in my own house."

          Since this is about noise, it's surely about the impact that your actions have on other people. The advice is pretty sensible, especially the aspect of "what sounds loud/quiet to you may not for others" and it's very hard to tell.

          So if you want to do what you like, move somewhere without neighbors :)

          There are already a plethora of regulations about what you can and cannot do in your own house, many with obvious ties to general safety (no explosives, bottles of petrol etc) as well as zoning. Running a home office is usually allowed in residential areas, but a workshop isn't. So it's a case of drawing a line somewhere.

          There is also a world of difference between how the UK governs and the Swiss, Germans and Dutch do it. The canton (or equivalent) has a great deal of power and authority over it's rules. So instead of a top down approach, one size fits all you get more detailed rules (and enforcement) and, IMHO, a better solution. It's also an awful lot easier to get a canton rule changed in Switzerland than getting a local council rule changed in the UK.

          "I may not agree with those who would cause all this noise, but I will fight for their right to cause it as long as it doesn't go too far."

          Well, pick one. Either you have rules about what is "too far", which is what the Swiss have, or you give a fuzzy definition that means enforcement is pretty much random. Or you stick with allowing everyone to make as much noise as they like, with no interference. So if you accept there is a "too far", you accept that the government DOES have a right to interfere, in that case.

          What exactly is too far is of course up for debate too :)

          I've lived in a place in Wellington that had apartment buildings on three sides. After the Christchurch earthquakes, two of the buildings decided to improve their earthquake proofing. This resulted in work being done without any effort at noise or dust dampening, with workers at the property line. They had noise consents 0800 - 2000 Mon to Sat, and broke them every single day. Well, except for Sundays for the first month, but then they where running behind.

          We made a complaint every three days. We had a recording device installed (record was 104Db Sunday 0930 in a bedroom). We could get an hours peace if we called noise control, as the contractor buggered off shortly afterwards (noise control call the construction company first, who claim they have no idea what's going on). But then they just go on later to catch up.

          These were all commercial rents, not a person's home. Yet nothing you can do, construction company claims it tells the contractors what hours they can work, contractors ignore you if you ask them, council shrugs and says "it's not a pattern of behavior, call noise patrol" and noise patrol are required to notify the works coordinator.

          To cap it off, we got a recorder set up, and not allowed to file new complaints. Noise control totally agrees that not only is it unacceptable, it's actually dangerous. That 104Db reading was when a worker was cutting out mortar using an angle grinder roughly six foot away from the bedroom. But since there are two renovations going on at the same time, and both claim that no-one was working on Sunday, and we didn't take any pictures then it's not clear whose fault it was. Oh, and one of their companies claimed that we'd made the noise ourselves......

          So with the options of "follow a bunch of rules" or "rules are meaningless and not enforced" I will prefer the first one.

          But I live in the Netherlands, so have gotten used to there being many many MANY rules to follow. Although most of their rules for what you can do with a house are sensible, all the bullshit ones are part of your mortgage :)

        4. pɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ

          Re: Being sensible

          "I live next to a church. If I fancy an early night on a Tuesday, it's impossible due to the campanologists practicing, but that is their right and their hobby so I would never dream complain."

          My dad, used to live within the shaddow of a spire of a church and made complaints about the bells...Not that he had a particular problem with the bells, it was a recording, over amplified into distortion, through large speakers mounted at the top of the spire.... for 15 minutes there was a terrible cacophony of noise... followed by 15 to 45 second silence before the noise started again.

          He argued that although the noise was bad enough, it was the gap before it started again that caused the majority of the mental stress inflicted by the 90 minutes of noise every Sunday from 10am to 11.30am.

          His complaint was upheld and the church had to stop using a recording but were told that they could use real bells.

        5. Kyle Roberts

          Re: Being sensible

          "I'm arguing against government regulation of what I do in my own house.

          I may not agree with those who would cause all this noise, but I will fight for their right to cause it as long as it doesn't go too far. "

          When you say "as long as it doesn't go too far." of course this means the government *does* have the right, in your opinion, to legislate what happens in a home *if it goes too far*. The problem is, we all have different views as to what is *too far* so we generally go with the perceived majority.

          Not a perfect system...

      4. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Being sensible

        The whole document made me very glad I don't live in Switzerland. Why is it the Government's place to dictate how you live your life?

        Maybe because it is world's last direct democracy and they thus generally have laws and rules that match what inhabitants want because they actually have to vote for them specifically as opposed to voting for people who subsequently break every promise they made during their election campaign?

        They may be a bit old fashioned in some things, but it works for them - all of them.

    2. Wellyboot Silver badge

      Re: Being sensible

      It's all about noise, not stopping you doing anything quietly!

      You can take a bath anytime, just don't pull the plug out during the quiet hours.

      Grass cutting, just use a scyth, screaming like a baby from self dismemberment is probably ok :)

      1. Sgt_Oddball Silver badge

        Re: Being sensible

        We Brits used to do similar things..

        About to buy a Victorian house and the original deeds are an eye opener.

        It includes restrictions on erecting any structure or doing garden work on a Sunday.

        It also bars the construction of 'steam engines, blacksmiths forge, stables and slaughter houses' which is a shame as I quite fancies building a forge so I could create a steam engine.

        It also prohibits the 'sale, storage, creation and consumption' of intoxicating liquors without the expressed permission of the landowner. Which puts a shadow over the homebrew I was planning too...

        1. Martin-73 Silver badge

          Re: Being sensible (@sgt_oddball_

          You can apply to have the restrictions on deeds removed. Back in the day the temperance movement was quite powerful and the 4 other prohibited activities could have badly affected the quality of life and were much more likely. I am not sure of the actual procedure to have the conditions removed.

          We have one restriction on our house: No caravans. (EN_US camping trailers)

          1. Sgt_Oddball Silver badge

            Re: Being sensible (@sgt_oddball_

            Martin-73; The planning restrictions are fine (The back gardens not that big after all), and it is in a smoke control zone. It just greatly amused me over the language and nature of what the restrictions.

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Being sensible

      "On another point they don't say you can't cut your lawn on a Sunday, they say you can't between the hours of 20:00 and 08:00 on a Sunday or public holiday, "

      The English in that document is somewhat idiosyncratic, the ban actually applies "between 20:00 and 08:00 on working days, and all day on Sundays and public holidays".

      France is as bad, on Sundays or holidays you can only mow your lawn between 10:00 and 12:30. Of course it's France, so no-one pays any attention to that law. Nor do they care if their lawn looks like a plowed field.

    4. Voland's right hand Silver badge

      Re: Being sensible

      Nothing of the kind.

      Most Swiss cantons as well as a lot of Austrian towns including Vienna itself operate a "horn only in emergency" policies with on the spot fines up to 500Euros in some places. Yes, you read that right - up to 500 fecking Euros. Additionally, both countries also charge for cop callout with the offender paying the charge. So make that around 540 Eu total or thereabouts.

      I had a close miss with one of those when my factory alarm activated in Vienna on the 23rd of December at 4am. It is, as you would expect from a factory alarm, wired to the horn. Now, bonus points on how to try to get the positive terminal of the battery disconnected in a small pitch black hotel courtyard (with the emergency torch refusing to work) before the first espresso.

      So what this piece of news means is that they will temporarily suspend its enforcement during the world cup. By the way, any Brits joking about the sense of humour (or lack of) German police have never seen Austrian or Swiss cops. They accept only people with the humour gland amputated at birth into the force there. Additionally, if you think that Britain is one nation under CCTV, you have not seen the traffic police there - they get life feed in their cruiser from all cameras on the stretch of road they patrol. So if you are trying to claim that "no sir, I did not [overtake | violate priority at roundabout | cut-off | tailgate | use horn]", you get the CCTV footage right in your face and your fine usually doubles there and then.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Being sensible

        Most Swiss cantons as well as a lot of Austrian towns including Vienna itself operate a "horn only in emergency" policies with on the spot fines up to 500Euros in some places.

        OK, but I also know from personal experience that their police forces are in general a heck of a lot more sensible about fining people because they still apply the concept of reasonableness. Heck, that even extends to parking fines - I have yet to find any other place where a parking warden was helpful, yet it happened to me in Zürich. Maybe it was because it was in one of the most expensive areas there (Seefeld), but it struck me how substantially different attitudes get when a budget is not dependent on income from fines - they actually enforce the law rather than bend it (and that wasn't a one off, by the way).

        So if you are trying to claim that "no sir, I did not [overtake | violate priority at roundabout | cut-off | tailgate | use horn]", you get the CCTV footage right in your face and your fine usually doubles there and then.

        Not just that, someone is actually watching. Especially if you're speeding in a tunnel (which is dangerous) you'll find that they'll have that chat with you in no time whatsoever. They'll be polite, factual and will already know by the time they get to you just how many times your name has been flagged for speeding - their systems work, and they don't do bullshit.

        Having lived there for a while, I'm in general OK with how they enforce laws. The system is heavy, but if you're willing to go along it's quite OK. Try to buck it, however, and you find just how fine it grinds.

      2. Michael Habel

        Re: Being sensible

        Most Swiss cantons as well as a lot of Austrian towns including Vienna itself operate a "horn only in emergency" policies with on the spot fines up to 500Euros

        I approve of this... In fact they shouold probably doubble the fine, just for fun. in fact I would ask why isnt this the law in ALL European Counties?

    5. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Being sensible

      Might I clarify, as a Swiss resident?

      "they don't say you can't cut your lawn on a Sunday, they say you can't between the hours of 20:00 and 08:00 on a Sunday or public holiday, "

      Nope. Maybe the wording is unclear, but noisy activities are allowed between 7 or 8am* to 8 or 9pm* Mon-Sat. On Sundays no excessively noisy activity is allowed at any time.

      "water pipes can be quite noisy and not to take a bath at night"

      It's generally OK to take a bath at night, just don't drain it - leave the water in and drain it the following morning. It's not OK to take a shower.

      By and large the rules are mostly kept to by all, but also between neighbours there is often a mutual acceptance of what is allowed which is different to the legal specification. Newer buildings are very soundproof (double glazing is standard, triple glazing is more common in new builds)

      Also to reply to the comment about 'who can afford to live there', well, it is very expensive but salaries are also high. Tax is low but government services are few and most services eg health must be paid for. In the end it all balances out much the same as most of western Europe

      *the exact rules vary between cantons

      1. LucreLout Silver badge

        Re: Being sensible

        It's generally OK to take a bath at night, just don't drain it - leave the water in and drain it the following morning. It's not OK to take a shower.

        Interesting.

        I get home from work at 6:40ish in the evening, then have an hour and a half family time while getting my child to go to sleep. I typically go for a run some time around 8pm or 8:30 start, finishing about 9pm or 9:30. It'd be impossible for me to exercise if I couldn't have a shower afterwards. There's no way I'm going to bed covered in sweat.

        My neighbours don't care about my running the shower because they do pretty much the same thing. We all get along great - beers over the garden fence when we're supposed to be cutting the grass etc.

        How does it work in Switzerland please? Do people not exercise on an evening? Always have a bath after then leave the water? (What if two people have gone running - how does the second runner bathe?)

        I'm sure I'm missing something somewhere.....

        1. ArrZarr Silver badge

          Re: Being sensible

          Well, that was an education.

          I don't complain to the church about the bells because they keep their practice to a couple of hours on a Tuesday. I don't like the fact that they do but, and here's the rub, it is their right to ring the bells whenever they like and I'm thankful they keep it to that time period with the constant bell ringing in evenings.

          And on the people commenting on "as long as it doesn't go too far", we have regulations in the UK on disturbing the peace, which do the same job, just with much less defined boundaries. To me, the ideal body of law would read "Don't be a dick to other people" and would end there. Of course, the only world in which that would work is one where you wouldn't need that law in the first place, but I hope you get the gist of what I'm trying to say here.

          This is all on a sliding scale. I can agree with laws about not keeping explosives in a private home. I can agree with laws about not killing people or imprisoning people in a private home (or anywhere for the former and most places for the latter), I just feel that this Swiss noise regulation is a massive government overreach, hence my previous comments.

  3. Teiwaz Silver badge

    Sensible

    Although I am sure fans will regard this as 'premiere league killjoying', I personally, as 'not a sport fan' aplaud the no-nonsense attitude.

    Most sport has become much much to over-hyped, ripping off fans on ticket prices, shirts, etc. and up the line to cost for the networks to actually broadcast it.

    It's been an over-inflated ego-fest for decades, and I quite agree with only minimal indulgence.

    1. ratfox Silver badge
      Happy

      Re: Sensible

      The very end of the document shows that they do have some sense of humour.

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    What actually happens if you're still horny after 60 minutes?

    1. ratfox Silver badge
      Devil

      You should probably see a doctor.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      What actually happens if you're still horny after 60 minutes?

      The usual course of action is to think about sport, but that might not help in this case

  5. disgruntled yank Silver badge

    Or they could vacation in the US

    There will not be a lot of noise from the fans of our team.

    1. Michael Habel

      Re: Or they could vacation in the US

      Thats's because you lot follow American Football. A Sport I gather which you disreguard the National Anthem, while handling some Egg shaped Ball. You see that' the problem right there. Its called Football for a reasion, as its a foul to contact the Ball with your arms, or hands. e.g. Foot... Ball (A Sport that is played by kicking a Ball, with ones Feet.)

      But, I forgive you lot, it is after all Baseball Season. And that's way more entertaing then a Football Match.

  6. macjules Silver badge

    Japanese Rugby

    while Japan (a nation with no real rugby reputation in the northern hemisphere)

    That is most unfair. The Japanese have a long tradition of rugby, almost as old as Britain’s, and are pretty good at it. IIRC the Brave Blossoms thrashed Wales a few years ago (2013) 23-8 and even beat South Africa.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Japanese Rugby

      "IIRC the Brave Blossoms thrashed Wales a few years ago (2013) 23-8 and even beat South Africa."

      Not to mention that in 1974, Max Boyce was sufficiently moved by the prowess of the Japanese team to include a song about them in "Live at Treorchy".

    2. Frumious Bandersnatch Silver badge

      Re: Japanese Rugby

      The Japanese also beat the Americans in their first semi-official baseball game, IIRC. Not that I was around to remember it, mind. It was (according to the net) back in 1896. The Samurai Champloo episode entitled "Baseball Blues" seems to conflate this match with the actual introduction of baseball by Perry's Black Ships in the run up to the Meiji Restoration period. でもさ、この番組は時代錯誤がたくさんあるよね。

      1. Michael Habel

        Re: Japanese Rugby

        Using Anime to cite historical records? gb2/Wikipedia

  7. GlenP Silver badge
    Pint

    More importantly...

    than the rugby matches listed is that we have a change to actually win a World Championship on Sunday when England Under 20s take on France in the final.

    Beer 'cause that's what I'll be drinking!

  8. Jamesit

    "...cautious so that the party remains beautiful until the end of the event,” they concluded."

    So at the end of the event the party can be ugly?:-D

    good to know.:-)

  9. DougS Silver badge

    No baths at night?

    What about flushing the toilet, that's much noisier than draining a tub.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: No baths at night?

      "If it's yellow, let it mellow. If it's brown, send it down."

      1. DougS Silver badge

        Re: No baths at night?

        Anyone who does that will find the deposits created by urine "mellowing" overnight require occasional muriatic acid soaking to clean the U-bend - otherwise the porcelain becomes less smooth and the brown things don't always flush down so well.

        Been there, done that, not worth it. Besides, if you have a female in the house they'll overrule "letting it mellow" anyway :)

  10. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    As a resident of Lausanne (the capital of Vaud), my only complaint is that this gives the noisy f*****s 60 minutes too much time to drive around being d*cks, trying their best to wake everyone up. At least I have the option to take my tent and go into the mountains, where, if there are football fans, at least they have the decency to be enjoying their chosen pastime quietly in their own homes, rather than by driving round every neighbourhood in town making as much noise as possible. And before anyone says so, no, I'm not swiss, but I do really appreciate the fact that they believe in rules to make it a more pleasant place to live.

  11. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    After 60 mins precisely you are allowed to then say cuckoo.

  12. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Land of cuckoo clocks?

    The land of cuckoo clocks would be the Black Forest area of Germany. Cuckoo clocks were neither invented nor have ever been produced in Switzerland and have absolutely nothing to do with the country.

    Of course we’re not dumb here and since some people still believe those clocks are archetypically Swiss, we’ll gladly sell Chinese-made plastic cuckoo clocks to you for 300£ a pop. We’ll even throw in a yodeling (ex-) parrot for you.

    1. Frumious Bandersnatch Silver badge

      Re: Land of cuckoo clocks?

      Yeah, but you've still got to admire that line from The Third Man...

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Land of cuckoo clocks?

      You've beaten me to it. That the Swiss are generally annoyed with being associated with that German contraption hasn't stopped them from profiting off it. They're very pragmatic over there :).

      BTW, I disagree that they don't have a sense of humour. That said, since I also know quite a few Germans with a fairly wicked sense of humour I may probably be biased, but the Swiss I know have a really rather dry and dark sense of humour.

    3. Michael Habel

      Re: Land of cuckoo clocks?

      Yes but, will the ex Parrot still pine for the Fjords?

  13. Winkypop Silver badge

    So, no modded V8s in Switzerland then?

    Guy across the street seems to be prepping for Bathurst.

  14. joshimitsu

    Does this allow for injury time?

    Injury time, extra time, penalties... this could all affect the start time of this grace period?

  15. silverfern

    Here in Germany you're "allowed" to shower (and presumably have a bath) any time day of night and the neighbours (presumably on the same floor of your block of flats) have to put up with it. This has been confirmed several few times by court decision (Germans just love going to law!). Reason: cleanliness is a "higher good". I am not exaggerating: judges have said this.

    Similarly, other court decisions have decided that as a source of noise, childrens' playgrounds do not need to be subjected to "quiet times" or be otherwise reined in because young children have to be free to jump around and yell and do all those things that young children do during childhood. Not unreasonable.

    And the court cases that are conducted over next-door neighbours having a barbecue (cooking odours) have to seen to be believed.

    But otherwise people do seem to be particularly allergic to noise here.

    The only explanation I can think of is that with 60% of Germany's population having to rent (population density: about 200 / sq. km) and therefore living - mostly - in blocks of flats, you've got more people breathing down your neck and you don't have the luxury of your own back yard where you have more latitude to do your own thing.

    So it wouldn't surprise me to learn that Switzerland and Austria have fairly similar rules for pretty much the same reasons. But that's only an educated guess.

  16. Geekpride

    Too lenient

    Although I fail to see the attraction of a "sport" that consists of feigning being mortally wounded if someone so much as touches your idiotic hairstyle, I reluctantly concede its popularity and accept that people are going to cheer when a goal is scored or a match won. What I don't accept is people doing this, then deciding to drive round and incessantly use their car horns. The first flush of emotion has passed by then, they should be more considerate of others. Summary execution is a tempting solution, but probably not defensible. Instead, I suggest they've shown they can't be trusted to use their car in a responsible and considerate way, so it should be taken away from them and crushed.

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