back to article IBM’s cloud adds availability zones

IBM’s added availability zones to its cloud. Big Blue’s definition of an availability zone will be familiar to cloud-using readers: the company says they’re a “logically and physically isolated location within an IBM Cloud Region with independent power, cooling and network infrastructures isolated from other zones to …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    intention to just about rebuild its entire cloud

    You know what they say, 5th time's the charm!

    I can see a time fairly soon where lots of people will be fired for buying IBM. It doesn't take a lot of due dilligence to rule them out of a bid these days due to complete instability of their strategy and company with layoffs all over the place and no clear direction. The marketing and accounts departments seem strong though, so perhaps they will pivot into a different market from IT :)

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: intention to just about rebuild its entire cloud

      The Crimson Permanent Assurance?

    2. returnofthemus

      Re: intention to just about rebuild its entire cloud

      LOL, I think the you'll find the real intention here is to differentiate it's cloud, though it would be fair to say the emphasis to date has been on it's Cloud Managed Services.

      IBM may appear slow moving, but it moves strategically and with purpose, some people just do not pay enough attention and usually end up making dull comments on matters that they can't comprehend.

      Though it really shouldn't take a Phd to work out the Cloud is a journey NOT a destination, the likes of the likes of American Airlines, Etihad Airways, Lufthansa, the US Army, the US Air Force, the BBC, New Zealand Ministry of Health, Marriott Hotels etc., can't all be wrong?

      Anyway let the architectural battle commence I think we all know how the story ends ;-)

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: intention to just about rebuild its entire cloud

        One needn't look at the customer list to know IBM's cloud expansion is a work of market fiction. Charles Fitzgerald does a wonderful job of breaking down the major public clouds by their spending, on the basis that you can't build a cloud without spending lots of money.

        http://www.platformonomics.com/2018/05/follow-the-capex-separating-the-clowns-from-the-clouds/

        The short version is that IBM's CAPEX is flat-or-falling in both percentage and absolute terms and is now a small fraction of what Amazon, Microsoft and Google all spend. IBM are not a cloud provider any modern sense of the word. The same goes for Oracle.

        1. returnofthemus

          Re: Charles Fitzgerald...

          Who???

          I would've thought it common knowledge that IBM's cloud expansion follows it's aquisitions of

          a) SotfLayer,

          b) Verzion's Cloud and Hosting Business

          c) AT&T’s managed application and managed hosting services business

          As previously stated IBM has clearly been focused on the Cloud Managed Services aspects of it's cloud (multi-year, multi-billon dollar, long-term contracts), whilst differentiating what it offers more generally.

          The public cloud has moved beyond IaaS and being able to spin up a VM is no longer a novelty.

          PS I too purchase books on Amazon, subscribe to Office 365 and upload, as well as watch video's on Youtube, but that really is just about it.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: intention to just about rebuild its entire cloud

        "emphasis to date has been on it's Cloud Managed Services."

        So...not a cloud then. If IBM understood cloud they'd also understand that when done properly there's nothing there to manage. Other than the application code and deployment code there really isn't anything there. No patching, no security monitoring, no networking, no operating systems, no hardware. That's what differentiates a cloud from hosting. AWS and Microsoft aren't offering servers in a data centre, and the fact that IBM still doesn't get that in 2018 is why they are on a slow cruise towards a big lose.

        1. returnofthemus

          Re: intention to just about rebuild its entire cloud

          "Other than the application code and the deployment code there really isn't anything there. No patching, no security monitoring, no networking, no operating systems, no hardware ".

          Fuck me, you're either not of this planet or you've been smoking some seriously strong shit!

          1. Lusty Silver badge

            Re: intention to just about rebuild its entire cloud

            @returnofthemus the customer doesn't need to manage those things, and so the customer doesn't need to pay for a managed service on those things. Managed services only work because IaaS (and the legacy version of IaaS IBM offers aka hosting) has so many things that break on the customer side of the deal. Real clouds like Azure and AWS manage those things for you by default and at scale, allowing it to be extremely cheap. Also, MS and Amazon don't offer the choice of not patching the OS or software stack, it's automatically updated and current all the time.

            1. returnofthemus

              Re: intention to just about rebuild its entire cloud

              "@returnofthemus the customer doesn't need to manage those things, and so the customer doesn't need to pay for a managed service on those things".

              Manage what things?

              You're obviously confused, may I suggest that you familiarise yourself with the NIST Cloud Computing definition for a better understanding of the general deployment models and service models, failing that this short tutorial should help ;-)

      3. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: intention to just about rebuild its entire cloud

        IBM may appear slow moving, but it moves strategically and with purpose, some people just do not pay enough attention and usually end up making dull comments on matters that they can't comprehend.

        I work at IBM & i'm not sure that's true. Headless chickens around here, endless onshore numpty PM's and techs who just don't get it. All the good ones have retired or moved on, those that remain are really bad and costing the customer time and money which is why i think they are here. the customer is equally as clueless and equally contributes to excess costs. Things will get worse here before they get better but the customer is so clueless they don't realise things could be done differently.

        Maybe all the outsourcer's realise this and are playing to the lowest common denominator, if that us the case then maybe your right and they've been strategically doing this but i'd suspect they'd have more to gain by having a great reputation and attracting and retaining the top talent providing an expensive service but one that customers know will deliver, German over American car's as an example.

        1. returnofthemus

          Re: I work at IBM...

          LOL, of course you do and my name real name is Bill Gates.

          I use to run a software company, clueless customers made me the richest man in the world, one of the key features of our software was turning SVGA colour screens blue, not only did our customers love it, they came back for more in future releases.

          It's truely amazing what people will put up with when they are the impression that they are getting something for FREE, look no further than Amazon AWS and all those clueless numpties that have been duped into Prime subscriptions ;-)

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: I work at IBM...

            AWS don't sell Prime subscriptions dumbass, Amazon Retail do.

            1. returnofthemus

              Re: AWS don't sell Prime subscriptions dumbass...

              LOL!

              Alexa, when did AWS spin-out from Amazon.com?

              PS Let's try and put this in perspective and not get too carried away ;-)

    3. TheVogon Silver badge

      Re: intention to just about rebuild its entire cloud

      "but not notably later than Azure's March 2018 debut of the feature"

      Microsoft does have over 50 cloud regions though so the need for availability zones within those regions was not desperate.

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