back to article Kill the blockchain! It'll make you fitter in the long run, honest

I am looking for a fit man. Sorry, did I forget to put that in quotation marks? C'est Mme D qui parle and she's staring at her computer screen. "I am looking for a fit man," she repeats in a monotone. I have a quick check around the room: nope, we haven't acquired an Echo, although she did say it twice (heh heh). Is she using …

  1. AdamT

    I love that the ad that I've got in the right sidebar for this article is for the "London Blockchain Summit"

    1. katrinab Silver badge

      And I love that the payment methods accepted should you wish to attend it are Visa, Mastercard, and Amex.

      If bitcoins are so amazing, why can't you buy blockchain conference tickets using them?

      1. getHandle

        They're sharks, not shark-bait!

        1. Swarthy Silver badge

          Re: They're sharks, not shark-bait!

          You got that right, chum!

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      "London Blockchain Summit"

      perhaps "Dung Hill" would be more appropriate ?

  2. Bob Wheeler

    Someone at work ...

    ... during the WannaCry outbreak suggested that we use the spare CPU capacity in our data centre to mine Bitcoins in case we need to 'payoff' anyone.

    Not a good look for a local authority.

    1. DougS Silver badge

      Re: Someone at work ...

      Also a tempting target for employees to steal since they wouldn't be on any inventory list and would most likely never be used so there wouldn't be any reason for anyone to verify they were still there...

      It would be like keeping gold coins in the unlocked supply closet accessible to any admin, but no one ever checking to see that they weren't replaced with gold plated equivalents.

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Blockchain just needs the word cistern in front of it as it stands.

    Thanks for the enable flash picture, I got a chuckle out of that because I said to myself before I read the text underneath "You can f*ck right off" and I'm sure I'm not the only one.

  4. Dodgy Geezer Silver badge

    What on earth...

    ...democratising the energy supply...

    ...does this mean?

    Can I vote for more Watt-hours?

    1. Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese Silver badge

      Re: What on earth...

      Power to the people!

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: What on earth...

        Ohm with you on that one.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: What on earth...

          Nah, better stay grounded.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: What on earth...

            Joule be sorry you started this.

            1. HelpfulJohn

              Re: What on earth...

              Watt?

              1. Montreal Sean

                Re: What on earth...

                I'm shocked that his has gone on for so long.

        2. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: What on earth...

          Ohm with you on that one.

          Resistance is futile

          1. Stoneshop Silver badge

            Re: What on earth...

            Resistance is futile

            I'm reluctant to accept that.

    2. Ledswinger Silver badge

      Re: What on earth...

      ..democratising the energy supply...

      ...does this mean?

      Draw up a chair, and I'll explain, and help cure your insomnia. In the electricity system, all the generators pile in (hopefully) enough watt-hours to keep everything ticking over, at the instruction of the System Operator. Currently that's National Grid, although the wankers of Ofgem would like that not to be the case. At your end you turn on the light switch, hopefully it works. Your supplier bills you based on your meter reading. But how do each of the c90 suppliers, and hundred of industrial customers who trade wholesale on their own account pay the many generators the right amount, and who pays for the c12% system losses? How are things sorted out when a supplier gets their sums wrong and hasn't contracted enough generation, or has too much? How does the system work so that suppliers can flog you electricty for 13p/kWh all through the winter, when peak wholesale prices can exceed £1.50 per kWh if there's a crunch. TaDa! The Balancing & Settlement System sorts this. There's a broadly similar system for gas. All in there's over 10,000 pages of system codes, so joining this party requires you to be pretty big and clever, or you can pay somebody big and clever to do it for you. All the arrangments and codes are publicly available, you can find them on the web and set yourself up as an energy trader and party to the Balancing & System Code if you want.

      According to the blockchain beard-fondlers, there's a problem here, that there's only one body who runs this system - for electricity it is Elexon. Somehow that's a closed, anti-democratic system, that wankchain could do away with. And it would supposedly enable magical things like peer-to-peer trading of energy, for example from residential PV owners directly to other parties. You can do that already with a "private wire" connection, but not if the electricity goes into the grid. Of course, if the PV owner exports to the grid, then blockchain "provenance" turns to ash because you can't direct a specific kWh, nor label it, but lets not let facts spoil their soya lattes. One interesting aspect of a block chain energy system is that the customer would need to either 100% accurately forecast and contract their capacity directly, or pay somebody else to provide the additional power above that. Paying to manage the risk in advance via a counterparty is expensive, taking the risk unhedged and uncontracted is financial suicide (as various small energy suppliers have found). In blockchain energy system, all those risks can be yours.

      In reality, the balancing and settling systems are really cheap to operate and effective. Like any good system, they work quietly in the background, 99%+ of the population don't know, don't need to know and don't care. The gas settlement system recently had a huge overhaul (Nexus) because it was running on an ancient lash up of systems, but outside the industry nobody knew or cared, and life went on as normal.

      So there's no value in replacing a (nominally) closed ledger with a distributed open version. As with everything blockchain, it is a complex, unproven solution searching in vain for a problem. But with shit head consultants bombarding our directors about the "importance of blockchain, AI and virtual reality, we keep on having to tell them "forget about it, it isn't a huge industry disruptor, its just a crock of shit being touted by charlatans".

  5. Blockchain commentard
    Facepalm

    I feel as if I should comment :-)

  6. Rob D. Bronze badge
    Paris Hilton

    Burn the heretic

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I2yN_HIxLzI

    'Nuff said. (Paris, because she believes.)

  7. Ken 16 Silver badge
    Devil

    A large consultancy at a tech conference this week

    explained that to derive value from B**lockchain, it needed to be combined with IoT and Artificial Intelligence. The example use case was a pay per use lift, micro-charging passengers per floor rather than an up front capital investment.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: A large consultancy at a tech conference this week

      A large consultancy at a tech conference this week explained that to derive value from B**lockchain, it needed to be combined with IoT and Artificial Intelligence.

      As in "please daisy-chain enough buzz words to completely disable anyone who dares questions our bills"?

      Ugh. I may have my beers early at this rate. Not that I need an excuse, but this would be one :)

      1. Chris G Silver badge

        Re: A large consultancy at a tech conference this week

        AI, Blockchain, IoT and a variety of Autonomous stuff all are in need of axing. Which brings me to the question; why has the Axe Murderer's axe got it's head on upside down?

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: A large consultancy at a tech conference this week

        >please daisy-chain enough buzz words to completely disable anyone who dares questions our bills

        Strangely enough, I was just reading a security-product website and was tempted to start a buzzword-bingo card just so I could shout *arse* when I got a full card..

        (Which would have been about 2/3 down the home page)

    2. Franco Silver badge

      Re: A large consultancy at a tech conference this week

      Pah, that'll never work without an agile cloud leveraging DevOps behind it.

      1. Mr Sceptical
        Facepalm

        Re: A large consultancy at a tech conference this week

        Use the stairs?

      2. Shadow Systems Silver badge

        Re: A large consultancy at a tech conference this week

        *Stands up suddenly, chair overturns, waving something overhead*

        BINGO! Bingo! I got a Bingo! That means I get to leave now - see you at the pub!

        *Runs for the door with my Bullshit Buzzword Bingo card clutched in hand & a full row of words blotted out*

        1. EarthDog Bronze badge

          Re: A large consultancy at a tech conference this week

          Not so fast. It needs to be containerized BYOD 24/7 serverless leverage synergy apps with social media capabilities.

    3. D@v3

      Re: AI lifts?

      They'll just end up hiding in the basement.

      1. ma1010 Silver badge

        Re: AI lifts?

        Don't you mean "Happy Vertical People Movers?"

        1. HelpfulJohn

          Re: AI lifts?

          Where are all these happy vertical people? Many people I meet are happiest when horizontal.

      2. The Oncoming Scorn
        Thumb Up

        Re: AI lifts?

        Or try moving sideways (briefly) as a sort of existential protest.

    4. CrazyOldCatMan Silver badge

      Re: A large consultancy at a tech conference this week

      The example use case was a pay per use lift

      Because, dontchaknow, we are all just gagging to be able to pay to use the lift.

      Moi, I'll take the stairs.

  8. Multivac

    You could create your own clock chain to keep track of who's round it amongst your regular drinking partners or even tracking hours in a baby sitting circle, it doesn't have to be a power guzzling pseudo currency, just a distributed ledger. Bitcoin really gets Blockchain a bad press.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: You could create

      "...clock chainto keep track of who's round it amongst your regular drinking partners..."

      That may ensure I will soon have fewer regular drinking partners.

    2. VinceH Silver badge

      Optional

      I encountered a flock chain while out walking once, when all the sheep in a field I was crossing decided to follow me.

      1. Shadow Systems Silver badge

        At Vince H, re: FlockChain...

        Ewe should feel sheepishly ba-aa-aa-ad over making comments like that! But I see through your warped weave - you can't pull the wool over my eyes!

        I'll get my coat, it's the one with the bottle of lanolin in the pocket. =-)p

        1. VinceH Silver badge
          Thumb Up

          Re: At Vince H, re: FlockChain...

          Ah, but the thing is... it's true.

          I can even identify the exact date by glancing back through my pictures (none of the sheep - just by finding the the right set of photos, including those from where it happened): 9th April, 2007 - Fice's Well on Dartmoor.

          I'm just glad I hadn't watched the documentary Black Sheep (2006), the night before.

          1. The Oncoming Scorn
            Coffee/keyboard

            Re: At Vince H, re: FlockChain...

            The more terrifying thing is when it's a herd of cows stalking you.

            I was following a footpath through one of the several interconnected fields on my then normal evening walk (While Mrs Scorn was left watching the recordings of Corry\Brookside on her return from work), when the cows started moving en-mass at high speed from the corner of the field I was currently in to a position in another corner & then stop to chew the grass & stare at me. A few minutes later they did it again.

            As a kid I hung around the nearby cattle market & armed with that knowledge & experience, thought that this was unusual behaviour for cows & perhaps instead of following my more normal walk through the rest of the fields to the pub I was aiming for, I should opt for the shorter route out of the field & towards the stile nearest to me.

            I was about 100 yards away, when I heard the hooves again & glanced to see what they were doing now & discovered they were bearing down on me at speed, my legs instantly went into overdrive & I ran like fuck for the stile & near enough vaulted over it, then coming to a panting sweating stop, I turned around to see that the cows had stopped & were as tightly packed as they could manage at the other side of the style, huffing & mooing at me.

            I had always preferred my cows well done on a plate or as furniture, footwear (or any other garment or furnishing), since then it's become a vengeful lifestyle.

            Icon because of the damn lucky escape I had.

            1. Shadow Systems Silver badge

              At The Oncoming Scorn, re: cows.

              There is a campground not too far from where I used to live. It is part of a farmer's pasture where his cows graze, but since they're used to people & everybody leaves each other alone, the farmer earns a bit of cash renting out bits for campers.

              It's quite nice, on the shore of a lake, great fishing, hiking, bird watching, canoeing (no power boats allowed), & generally a most pleasant place in which to pitch a tent, sit around a camp fire, & make Smores (melted ghram cracker/marshmallow/chocolate treats).

              One night I'm out at said site, need to take a wee, & come out of my tent... to find a cow standing not ten feet away, absolutely still, staring at me as if it's considering the best way to get away with murder. I cautiously step aside to go around, the cow steps sideways to match. I move back the other way, so does the cow. I stop, he stops. I wave my arms & yell, he just chews his cud & says "moo" in the same tone used to deliver lines like "I bet you die screaming."

              I freak out, run the other direction past my tent, & sprint just as fast as my legs could carry me to the nearest stone outhouse. I didn't come out until morning. I found my tent had been trampled, the tattered remains shat upon, & my leather hiking boots stomped upon until they were barely identifiable.

              The farmer gave me my site rental fee back, I got the hell out, & I hope there were LOTS of hamburgers for supper the next few months.

              Fucking cows.

              It's a good thing I'm blind now & can't see, otherwise I'd take a flame thrower to the site & have me a BBQ.

              *Cackle*

              I'll get my coat, it's got my Dried Frog Pills in the pockets. Lots of 'em. Tasty, tasty pills...

            2. Stoneshop Silver badge

              Re: At Vince H, re: FlockChain...

              The more terrifying thing is when it's a herd of cows stalking you.

              A single bull is more than sufficient.

              One summer job I had was staking out the grid for a seismic survey: some geophysicist takes a map, draws a grid on it, then a bunch of fellows go out in the field to transpose each of the grid lines to the Real World. The first group has 1:10000 maps, compasses (pre-GPS, all this), a 30m long cord, stakes, and a notepad. Following a few km back are the grunts, carrying cables, geophones (kind of like a tent peg with a sensor on top), drilling equipment, explosives and cat litter. The first crew stakes out the line, noting the locations where the drilling pattern has to be changed because of proximity to underground cables, pipes, sheds, etcetera. The second crew places the geophones, drills holes in the ground, puts explosives in them and topping up the hole with cat litter, things go boom, geophones record reflections of boom against various underground layers, recording gets fed into a computer which then spits out a nice cross-section of the underground layers, geophysicist ponders output and divines the spot to drill for gas (in this case).

              Some of that work was gruelling. You don't want to know how much time it takes to proceed through shrubland brimming with ripe raspberries.

              One day I was working alone to stake out a section which took me through a meadow with a number of calves in them. Rather annoying, they tended to eat the stakes and crowd around me slowing my work, but never mind. As long as I could continue at the far end with maybe a few meters error, that would be fine; at the next point on the map that provided an absolute reference the error would be taken out.

              A few fields on the occupants were adult cows. Still fine initially, they were in the field next to the one I was in. Alas, the gate between the fields was open, and one of them was not a cow. Who clearly resented my presence, and went to express his displeasure with great speed. This prompted me to perform a sprint that would have Usain Bolt take up bonsai gardening or something, finishing with a diving roll under a fence with a hedgerow behind it, allowing me to get out of sight of the bull.

              I fully agree with the attitude expressed re. bovine uses.

              1. onefang Silver badge

                Re: At Vince H, re: FlockChain...

                "You don't want to know how much time it takes to proceed through shrubland brimming with ripe raspberries."

                You could no doubt get through it quicker if you don't stop to pick and eat the raspberries.

            3. CrazyOldCatMan Silver badge

              Re: At Vince H, re: FlockChain...

              I had always preferred my cows well done on a plate or as furniture, footwear (or any other garment or furnishing)

              And this is why I think sheep should like me - I'd never, ever voluntarily eat one[1]. I wear plenty of stuff made from their wool though. And I would privately would admit to having a sh**pskin jacket..

              [1] The last time I was presented with lamb that I couldn't refuse (without causing great offence) I managed to use up most of a jar of mint sauce - just so I wouldn't taste the lamb. Goat has a similar effect - I've tried curried goat a couple of times and I'd like to say I loved it (and probably would if it was anything other than goat or lamb) but I was nearly sick after a couple of mouthfuls. I just don't like lamb/mutton/hogget/goat.

  9. Rich 11 Silver badge

    Max facked up

    use blockchain to handle cross-border transportation payments between autonomous vehicles

    Maybe this is the magical technology that half the Cabinet is currently arguing for in their max fac* fix for Norn Irelan's problems. It's either that or some more ministers are going to have to learn about the right hashtags needed to solve the problem.

    *Or maybe it's the 'pretend this is the EU' customs payments fix. I can't keep the nonsense straight anymore.

  10. Jon 37

    Blockchain is the wrong solution to anything

    Blockchain is an interesting technical hack to make Bitcoin work.

    It works equally well/badly for all the Bitcoin clones out there.

    For anything else... it doesn't fit.

    The whole hype about blockchain is (at best) buzzword-driven / solution-driven architecture. I.e. "we know what the solution is, lets try to fit it to another problem even though it's not actually the best solution to that problem". All the blockchain applications I've heard of could be implemented simpler and better with normal centralized databases.

    At worst, most "Blockchain" is a scam that is used to part the gullible from their money.

    1. katrinab Silver badge

      Re: Blockchain is the wrong solution to anything

      But there is also a "smart contract" which can do all sorts of amazing things, though nothing that wasn't predicted in the book Ada Lovlace published in 1834.

  11. MiguelC Silver badge

    Shame on me, indeed

    But, in my defense, as it came from Dabbsy and was on El Reg... OK, no excuse, I'll go flagellate myself now

  12. Goonery

    ...the cat farts...

    My eyes started watering, my stomach heaved and I burst out laughing - all at the same time.

    Thanks Dabbsy!

    1. chivo243 Silver badge
      Happy

      Re: ...the cat farts...

      +1

      I liked the bit about tumble weeds.... they should also be in slow motion ;-}

      1. Tikimon Silver badge

        Re: ...the cat farts...

        "I liked the bit about tumble weeds...."

        Don't forget the forsaken moaning of the arid wind, broken only by the piercing cry of a distant hawk in the parched, burning sky. Bonus points for a cow skull in the foreground!

        1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

          Re: ...the cat farts...

          "Don't forget the forsaken moaning of the arid wind, broken only by the piercing cry of a distant hawk in the parched, burning sky. Bonus points for a cow skull in the foreground!"

          I never knew SE London could be so interesting.

        2. Stoneshop Silver badge
          WTF?

          Re: ...the cat farts...

          Hawks? Vultures you mean.

  13. Zedsquared

    If it's not currency, where's the incentive to mine blocks?

    Surely any blockchain project that *isn't* currency is going to have a really hard time persuading people to mine blocks and thus end up with what is basically just an inefficiently implimented centralised database which is open to insider abuse and mistrust by outsiders?

    1. katrinab Silver badge

      Re: If it's not currency, where's the incentive to mine blocks?

      Indeed, and there was a 51% attack on Bitcoin Gold (one of the many forks of Bitcoin) recently.

    2. Alistair Dabbs

      Re: If it's not currency, where's the incentive to mine blocks?

      Blockchain does not require anything to be mined. Only cryptocurrencies do that.

      1. Black Road Dude

        Re: If it's not currency, where's the incentive to mine blocks?

        Without an incentive such as mining a blockchain is just a shared ledger a distributed database if you like. There is nothing new or novel about a blockchain on its own. With the mining incentive it solves the byzantine generals problem and defends itself from attack.

        I'm sick of hearing people say it's the blockchain that's the real innovation. It's not.

        1. Charles 9 Silver badge

          Re: If it's not currency, where's the incentive to mine blocks?

          What a blockchain is (and the key is in the word itself) is a running ledger in which each new entry authenticates the stuff before it, and so on back. I suppose the book equivalent is to only use indelible ink on tear-resistant pages (both provide tamper-evidence similar to the signatures on the blockchain entries). But at least a blockchain is pretty easy to duplicate while preserving whatever authenticity it provides.

          I've been leery of articles that discuss blockchains as well, but I at least take the view of, "Why do you need to keep a running book of authenticated transactions?" It's just that everything I've seen so far apart from e-currencies lack that need, so I move on. There's probably some legitimate uses out there that I haven't seen yet (using a blockchain in a courier or delivery service, for example); it's just we're still at the "90% hype" stage.

          1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

            Re: If it's not currency, where's the incentive to mine blocks?

            "Why do you need to keep a running book of authenticated transactions?"

            And especially one that's so compute intensive.

          2. katrinab Silver badge

            Re: If it's not currency, where's the incentive to mine blocks?

            If you have for example the Royal Mail parcel tracking service, what problem does it have that a blockchain would solve?

            Corruption of Royal Mails database is not something that I've ever seen happen, and if delivery staff were to input incorrect information to it, they could do that to a blockchain as well.

  14. Tim 11

    Real Gains

    However you call it, there's no doubt that a lot of people have made a lot of *real* money on crypto-currency speculation.

    All that's required to make money is that we're not at the top of the hype curve yet. That's why people buy houses and twitter shares and lots of other things that are hopelessly overvalued, not because they think they are undervalued but because they believe that someone else in the future will be even more gullible and will take said asset off their hands for more than they paid.

    Although like (presumably) Alistair, I haven't put my own money into crypto, I think a lot of the negativity that comes out of some commentators is because (like me) they're just pissed off they think they've missed the boat, and they want to justify it.

    1. Voyna i Mor Silver badge

      Re: Real Gains

      Though I'm not invested in his firm I think Warren Buffett is absolutely right. If you can't send a team round to see what's going on, inspect the books, look at the factory, talk to the customers and suppliers...don't invest in it.

      Obviously people get rich out of scams. Some of them get very rich. But they are mostly the ones that started it. Some of the initial marks taken along for the ride make a sizeable profit if they get out in time - you need people enthusiastically hyping your scam after all. But I also remember Taleb's advice; the best way to get rich if you want to trade rather than invest is to find something with a very big downside indeed and keep betting on the downside happening. You will lose money until you suddenly make a lot. With things like Bitcoin you can't really short them, which is one of the things that makes them suspect - the market can't tell you what it thinks.

      1. Black Road Dude

        Re: Real Gains

        Yes you most certainly can short them. There are exchanges that offer this or if your more old school there are about 6 large banks offering futures now.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Real Gains

      However you call it, there's no doubt that a lot of people have made a lot of *real* money on crypto-currency speculation.

      Yup. Key is the realisation that the coin itself doesn't generate the value, it's the trading in it (and all the other contributing factors that affect the trade value such as scarcity). If you want to be really honest, it's not all that different from FX trading - after all, we;re no longer dealing with money (= tied to a commodity such as gold) but currency (= whatever a government decides it's worth, just that in the crypto coin world there's no such thing as a central government).

      I may have some of that wrong, not exactly an expert :).

    3. Steve K Silver badge

      Re: Real Gains

      Not sure if a house is a good example here - unlike shares/bitcoins you can at least live in it.

      Additionally its value is also dictated by location - i.e. to live somewhere with amenities valuable to you (and others) you have to pay more.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Real Gains

        Houses are also subject to pump and dump, though. Get a few lifestyle journalists to move to your area, before long articles appear about it in the magazines and newspapers, people from London or the Midlands think it looks a nice place to live and house prices start to rise. Soon nobody is building any affordable housing (who would, when they can advertise in London and find ready buyers), prices rise still faster, and before long shop prices are rising as rents increase and infill starts to happen removing amenity spaces. The very things that attracted people in the first place disappear.

        At some point people will get tired of the pressures of growth, profit taking will start and things will return to normal. But some people will be left with huge mortgages, the price of other people's profits.

        I suspect that the analogy with cryptocurrencies is pretty close except that you can't go into a cryptocurrency and buy a chai latte and gluten free brownie.

  15. NotMyRealName

    Wut?

    tracking providence?

    providence: The guardianship and control exercised by a deity

    If a blockchain could do that, it would be a singular feat!

    "tracking provenance" makes more sense.

    1. Alistair Dabbs

      Re: Wut?

      Bah. I'd blame autocorrect but I have no idea what I must have typed. Provenance, of course.

      1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

        Re: Wut?

        "Provenance, of course."

        Or maybe Provence would make Mme D feel more a t home?

  16. 2+2=5 Silver badge
    Joke

    Blockchain - a future proofed bandwagon

    The most remarkable thing about Blockchain in the fast moving world of IT bandwagons, is that its inventors had the foresight to incorporate a then future IT bandwagon - AI - into its very name. Ladies and Gentlemen, I present to you: BlockchAIn

  17. Roger Kynaston
    Joke

    blockchain?

    bollockschain shirly.

  18. Potemkine! Silver badge

    An advice for Mr. Dabbs.

    Keep this article somewhere, you'll be able to reuse it a few years with just replacing "blockchain" by the next hyper-hyped technology. Et hop, Blockchain will offer you a quite work-free column with a simple "search and replace".

  19. ma1010 Silver badge
    Black Helicopters

    Those blockchains can be dangerous, too!

    See obligatory Dilbert

    1. Stoneshop Silver badge

      Re: Those blockchains can be dangerous, too!

      One like this. And that's just a portable version.

      Now imagine a block of concrete as used in roadway barriers or seawall strengthening, fitted with a length of anchor chain as used on ocean-going shipping.

  20. LeahroyNake Bronze badge

    I read it twice

    On the second go I swapped out Blockchain for Cloud and it was hilarious.

  21. Electric Panda

    Blockchain is yet another daft IT bandwagon hype trains and I'm getting mighty sick of those.

    I am now exploring alternative careers to escape the iT industry entirely. It'll mean a pay cut and a lot of hard work, but I'm absolutely well up for it.

    1. Notas Badoff Silver badge

      One word: 'Miming'. I hear a bit'o'miming is very profitable these days.

  22. Fruit and Nutcase Silver badge

    Memo?

    Did someone at Vulture Towers forget to send M. Dabbs the memo about cryptocurrencies?

    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/05/22/register_ebook_micropayments_trial_satoshipay/

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