back to article Apple's QWERTY gets dirty leaving fanbois shirty

Mac laptop owners are experiencing frequent failures with the delicate "butterfly switch" keyboards introduced three years ago and included on its "TouchBar" MacBook Pro models two years ago. Apple opted for the design to make its thin laptops even more anorexic, but they fail easily and are expensive to fix. Even diehard …

  1. DJV Silver badge
    Facepalm

    That's the trouble with...

    ...keyboards that are designed more for looks that practicality. I loath short-travel keyboards - the one that came with my 2009 iMac is just about tolerable for small amounts of use. For normal work on my PC I'm using a 20-year-old Microsoft* keyboard with nice chunky keys that have lots of travel. It has to be ripped apart and de-gunked every few years but it survives that and is still going strong.

    * One of the few decent things MS has ever built.

    1. The First Dave

      Re: That's the trouble with...

      It's not the amount of travel that matters, its the response, something that Apple keyboards have usually been pretty good at.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: That's the trouble with...

        Not only is the keyboard subject to dying, it's absolute shit to type on. Worst keyboard I've ever had on a laptop. FU Jone Ive.

      2. big_D Silver badge

        Re: That's the trouble with...

        For a touch typist, the amount of travel is also important.

        The MacBook Pro keyboard is one of the worst keyboards I've used in over 35 years of computing. Not just the response, but the finger is still on the down stroke and the key has already reached bottom, before you register you have touched it.

        It is the same with most modern, non-mechanical keyboards. I miss my old Microsoft Natural keyboard, from the first generation. I've had each successive generation and the keys have become worse and worse, although the worst is possibly the 4000, the two newer generations are slightly better, but still not a patch on the original.

    2. BebopWeBop Silver badge

      Re: That's the trouble with...

      I asuspect I can beat that - still using an IBM clickety-click keyboard on my (mac) :-) Worked long and hard to maintain a connection between keyboard and machines.... Admit II do not work in an office in which people might be irritated by the clatter.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: That's the trouble with...

        "IBM clickety-click "

        Wyse one here.The amount of time my head has slammed into it having to deal with numpties on a daily basis show how bloody good it is. And yes it pisses people off, but so will their moans in 10 years time when they suffer RSI.

        Have a Cherry at home.

    3. Sgt_Oddball Silver badge
      Windows

      Re: That's the trouble with...

      It's why I still use a venerable a1048 keyboard with my work Mac(15 years old and only used for about 5 years so it's still in good condition). Saves on having to use a keyboard that feels like I'm typing using mouse buttons.

    4. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Macbook 12 keyboard issue easily avoidable

      1. If your Macbook 12 keyboard is genuinely faulty, you probably have a Gen 1 2015 model. A bad batch of keyboards apparently found their way into Gen 1 product. If keyboard issues on a Gen 1 cannot be corrected with compressed air, Apple DOES replace the entire top cover (which inc. the keyboard) on these models for free if the product is under warranty. My advice: when buying a Gen 1 anything frim Apple, purchase Applecare on the 364th day after purchase.

      2. If you plan to use the Macbook 12 in the Real World (not inside Jony Ive’s all-white echo chamber), always use a Moshi Clearguard keyboard cover, which is made specifically for the Macbook 12 Retina. It’s ultrathin, disappears visually once installed, does touch the screen when Macbook is closed, and isolates the keyboard from the dirty world that you inhabit. Wash the keyboard cover with soap and water once a month. If you detect keyboard outline marks on the display, cleaning the Macbook screen Is a 10 second procedure. If you want the Macbook to survive, take some responsibility.

      Bottom line: the fault, dear Brutus, is not in our keyboards, but in ourselves.

  2. Slx

    The problem is you're all typing wrong and need new fingers, obviously!

  3. vir

    I Have A Fix

    Figure out a way to put components inside the empty space in a buckling spring keyboard. Like 104 tiny batteries or maybe some RAM chips. Classic. Timeless.

    1. malle-herbert Silver badge
      Facepalm

      Re: I Have A Fix

      104 tiny exploding Lithium-Ion batteries... Great !

      1. TRT Silver badge

        Re: I Have A Fix

        I've got a gaming keyboard with RGBW LEDs in there... does that count?

    2. DJV Silver badge

      Re: I Have A Fix

      Back in the 1980s they used to stick a whole computer under the keyboard!

  4. djstardust Silver badge

    This is exactly why I now avoid Apple gear

    Poor quality components and build leads to inherent faults but out of warranty you're on your own. And for the price of Apple products and the fact they are "premium" (apparently) they should have a 5 year warranty.

    £502 for a keyboard replacement is insane, especially when you can buy their complete standalone metal one for an already expensive £129. they are really really taking the piss with this.

    Time and time again this happens to Apple gear but mugs just go back for more. Bending iphone 6 models, peeling screens, dodgy batteries, MacBook Pro video card issues ..... the list goes on.

    On the other hand, my 8 year old 24" cinema display backlight circuitry died this week. It was one of the old school Apple products built to last, unlike the thin designer crap they produce today. Given the fact it was used pretty much every day over an 8 year period and cost £600, that's twenty pence a day, so not bad value at all. But after investigating it is in fact another inherent design fault where the power supply to the back light burns out. Most of these cinema displays are now dead with exactly the same issue, but of course Apple now don't repair them or stock any parts. Shock.

    1. DJO Silver badge

      Re: This is exactly why I now avoid Apple gear

      they should have a 5 year warranty

      In the EU there's an unlimited statutory guarantee for design faults and flaws. This should be fixed for free.

      Of course in counties where the rights of companies usurp the rights of consumers, tough shit.

      1. David Webb

        Re: This is exactly why I now avoid Apple gear

        In the EU there's an unlimited statutory guarantee for design faults and flaws.

        I believe the rule in the UK is "it's supposed to last a reasonable amount of time", you'd expect an expensive piece of gear to last around 10 years without breaking down, so if it breaks down in that time period you can get a claim and Apple should fix it for only P&P.

    2. emmanuel goldstein

      Re: This is exactly why I now avoid Apple gear

      My Samsung display (used every day for 9 years) is still working like a dream. It cost less than £200.

      1. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

        Re: This is exactly why I now avoid Apple gear

        My 2006 MacBook is still going strong. My 2 year old Samsung TV packed up last week with a bright yellow line across the screen. It was f*king expensive,

        Just sayin’.

        1. TVU Silver badge

          Re: This is exactly why I now avoid Apple gear

          "My 2 year old Samsung TV packed up last week with a bright yellow line across the screen. It was f*king expensive"

          They are known for buying in el cheapo capacitors which, not surprisingly, fail after a few years. My advice is to avoid this brand entirely for televisions.

          1. Jaap Aap

            Re: This is exactly why I now avoid Apple gear

            Oh, yes, but at least the capacitors in those samsung tv's are easily replaced by some Panasonic FM electrolytics.

            The last few I fixed had a case that opened with screws, and the PCBs were really easy to work on.

          2. ~chrisw

            Re: This is exactly why I now avoid Apple gear

            A colleague with boss-level electronics experience recently repaired a fairly new smaller Samsung TV (21") whose power IC decided to let some of its magic smoke out and make a second component (HV ceramic cap) to fail in sympathy. It's apparently a fairly common failure mode in modern TVs due to the cheap caps they fit, a £5 component to replace, and an hour's worth of effort (apparently taking the casing off takes the most time). The TV once again works perfectly, whereas most people would either take it down the tip or RMA for a new unit if in warranty (we know the original would be binned eventually).

            When I bought a Samsung 32" TV about five years ago from Richer I fortunately took out the 5 year cover... The LCD panel packed in with nasty vertical bars 15 months in so an engineer replaced the panel and it's worked perfectly since (touch wood). I would have been screwed otherwise: arguments of CRA/SOGA aside, you're often SOL unless you have a benevolent manufacturer warranty outside of 6 months.

            This reinforces the point: technological advances leave us in a situation where things often prematurely fail due to complexity of manufacturing. Because they're so much more complex than even ten years ago, fewer people understand how to diagnose and repair the commonest types of failures.

            I hate seeing good kit thrown out that's otherwise functional except for one failed component preventing it working. It happens on such a huge scale now. My employer alone must bin many tons of equipment which is declared as 'beyond economical repair'.

            More than that, I hate things deliberately being made incredibly hard - or impossible - to repair or return to good condition. Making a phone a couple of mm more slender by glueing in a non-replaceable battery is a common example and it's been a primary motivator for buying LG phones up to now. But even they've caved to integrated batteries now.

            I used to repair my own mobile phones if I damaged them, cracked the screen, damaged the speaker or camera assembly... It's just getting too hard now, even with disassembly guides, and kiss that manufacturer warranty goodbye if you try. But the general public doesn't need to give a shit about sustainability or longevity when the latest fondleslabs get glossy media launches every 12 months.

            Crazy high industry-wide wastage, the wrong mindsets all round, and even after recovering all salvageable things like rare metals it's got to be doing our ecosystem no good. I wonder when we'll get the balance right between innovation and sustainability.

            1. coconuthead

              Re: This is exactly why I now avoid Apple gear

              While I agree with the general thrust of your post, you haven't rigorously made your point in the last paragraph. Suppose for the moment that Apple succeeds in their apparent aim of making it impossible for anyone but Apple to repair their products. Then the failed parts they pull out of them will all get recycled according to the "fully closed cycle" policy they have so publicly nailed to their mast. In contrast, when most end users repair an electronic item the failed parts go to landfill.

              Apple also, at least here in Australia, accept their products back for recycling at the end of their life. I just rocked up with my dead polycarbonate Macbook to the local mall. At the time there was no government or council-operated recycling of electronic items; they usually went to landfill.

              This is not to say the way these keyboards are designed is not consumer-hostile. They should just unbolt from the top of the laptop. Apple could achieve 100% recycling by refusing to sell you a new keyboard module unless you brought the old one in for recycling.

          3. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

            @TVU

            "They are known for buying in el cheapo capacitors which, not surprisingly, fail after a few years."

            Yep heard of this. In my case it's apparently the ribbon cable failing where it's press-fitted to the panel. Considered economically unrepairable as it needs a new connector, which is apparently so welded to the panel it's impossible to replace.

            Sammy offered me €500 toward the purchase of a new Sammy telly. That's roughly equivalent to the current second hand value so not too bad an offer, my dilemma is if I actually want another Sammy TV or whether another brand will be more reliable. Philips are garbage, Sony have slow UI/OS issues... the only brand that currently seems to consistently come out on top is LG. And as they weren't considered an 'A' brand until fairly recently, I'm dubious about them as well.

            1. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Re: @TVU

              LG OLED is awesome, still building market share so might have a seven year warranty capacitor?

              I’m visiting Applestore tomorrow as the front OLED just fell off my Apple Watch , 18 months after purchase. They first tried to suggest that I authorize them £176 by credit card for any out of warranty repairs that might be needed, but I think they might have considered using a stronger crosslinked polymer to glue the bits together! My watch screams manufacturing defect - I’m not certain that it’s a swollen battery issue yet.

    3. TVU Silver badge

      Re: This is exactly why I now avoid Apple gear

      "It was one of the old school Apple products built to last, unlike the thin designer crap they produce today. Given the fact it was used pretty much every day over an 8 year period and cost £600, that's twenty pence a day, so not bad value at all"

      Since the unfortunate demise of Steve Jobs, quality control in respect of both Mac equipment. and macOS itself, has regrettably declined. Apple needs to make quality their prime consideration again and not thinness as at present.

    4. TFL
      Linux

      Re: This is exactly why I now avoid Apple gear

      That extortionate price is due to replacing not just the keyboard, but the other bits that are glued together too. Top case, keyboard, track pad, and battery are probably all together.

      I needed a battery replacement on my late-2013 Retina MBP, and that's what got replaced. Then the main board died days later.... so I bought a ThinkPad instead of dropping another $700CAD fixing the Mac. Now I've got an awesome keyboard, parts replacement I can do myself, and in this case, can add RAM and more storage at will.

      1. Dan 55 Silver badge

        Re: This is exactly why I now avoid Apple gear

        I needed a battery replacement on my late-2013 Retina MBP, and that's what got replaced. Then the main board died days later....

        There were two known design problems that made it look like the main board died over a good few years, one was Apple used the wrong type of capacitor and the other was a chip became unseated. If you use the right capacitor or seat the chip properly it should spring back to life. Google will find it for you.

  5. Slx

    People also need to get a bit realistic about how thin a computer they actually want. The anorexic lappy wars have gone a bit insane. I mean the current Macs are so thin that a headphone jack barely fits into the case.

    1. Blank Reg

      It's the same problem with phones. Instead of making them stupidly thin, put in a bigger battery. I expect most people would welcome a 50% battery boost in exchange for a 2mm thicker phone.

      1. My other car WAS an IAV Stryker
        Thumb Up

        Thicker phone

        Thumbs up for more battery.

        (Put the headphone jack back in while you're at it!)

    2. DiViDeD Silver badge

      Thin & Thinner

      You know, I've bought a lot of electronic kit in my life, and have considered performance, computing power, ergonomics (does it fit in my hand/lap/workroom/car? does it get uncomfortably hot? etc), but never, not once, have I ever thought "You know, that meets my requirements in every way, but it's just too damn thick"

      One of the funniest things to watch at my current workplace is the droids running from meeting to meeting with their razor thin notebooks perched on one arm, open, because, if they shut the lid the damn things power off. Maybe a way to fold your PC without having to restart it at the other end would be a better design goal.

      Unless it adds half a mil to the thickness, of course.

      1. Updraft102 Silver badge

        Re: Thin & Thinner

        One of the funniest things to watch at my current workplace is the droids running from meeting to meeting with their razor thin notebooks perched on one arm, open, because, if they shut the lid the damn things power off.

        What OS are these things running? In Linux and Windows, you can configure what closing the lid does. I have mine set to do nothing when the lid is closed when on mains power, and to standby (sleep) when on battery.

  6. Kajiki

    Would be good to hear from a professional who repairs Apple products for a living.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AUaJ8pDlxi8

    1. nematoad Silver badge
      Unhappy

      Strangely enough I was watching that yesterday, and I thought that what Rossmann says about customers coming in with broken iThings and still keep coming back for more. "That's not rational, that's religious."

      Apple are a quasi-cult. No matter how badly Apple stiffs the customer with shoddy build quality, poor customer treatment and extortionate prices the true-believer will always return no matter how much they are out of pocket.

      With a base like that you could be the worst company in the world to do business with and yet still turn a hefty profit.

      1. Dan 55 Silver badge

        I do like the OS, although lately that leaves something to be desired too.

        The only Mac I'd consider now would be a Mac Mini, but that's probably the next one on the chopping block.

    2. pɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ

      I was gonna post that video myself.

      when its presented the way Louis does, it really makes me wonder why anyone spends money at apple shops.

  7. ThomH Silver badge

    $700 is more than the cost of the logic board

    As someone who has recently used the service, the current cost charged by Apple for an out-of-warranty replacement of the original Retina MacBook's logic board — i.e. the single component that comprises the CPU(/GPU), RAM and SSD — is $475 for the part plus $100 for the labour.

    So it's more than 20% more expensive to replace the keyboard than it is all the bits that actually constitute the computing part of the computer? Somebody definitely needs to go back to the drawing board on that design, I think.

  8. Dan 55 Silver badge
    Devil

    I fscking hate Apple keyboards

    I'm good at knocking drinks over keyboards. My fault I guess, but iMac wired USB keyboards are guaranteed to stop working even after you leave them upside down in a tray of rice in the airing cupboard for a week.

    I don't hate them as much as their magic/mighty mice though which appear to be designed to give you carpel tunnel syndrome. How come Logitech can make them for a tenner yet Apple can't?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: I fscking hate Apple keyboards

      I don't hate them as much as their magic/mighty mice ... How come Logitech can makesell them for a tenner yet Apple can't?

      FTFY

    2. pɹɐʍoɔ snoɯʎuouɐ
      Boffin

      Re: I fscking hate Apple keyboards

      leave them upside down in a tray of rice in the airing cupboard for a week.

      this is not the way to fix water damaged equipment. As soon as water gets inside it will start to corrode tracks.

      the correct way to fix water damaged items is to open it up, take out the electronics, and clean it in a sonic bath... then rinse with isopropyl alcohol leave to dry in a warm moisture free place. reassemble.

      If you dont drive out the moisture it will just corrode over time and the damage will be irreparable.

      1. Dan 55 Silver badge

        Re: I fscking hate Apple keyboards

        Guess what? Yes, the keyboard is glued together.

  9. Richard Crossley
    Stop

    Definitely prefer the older Macs

    I have a 2015 Macbook Air, 11 inch. Bought for being able to use in cattle class and on trains. The keyboard is truly excellent. If I buy another I'll be scouting around the used computer mall a couple of miles away to pick up a Macbook Pro that doesn't have one of these horrible keyboards.

    Right now, typing this on an Apple Polycarbonate keyboard plugged into a Linux laptop.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Definitely prefer the older Macs

      That's why, in 2017, I bought the 2015 model 13" Macbook Pro (while you still could).

  10. kevin king

    I use a simple tool to clear any dirt from the keyboard that would get in the way of travel http://menda.descoindustries.com/MendaCatalog/Hand-and-Power-Tools/Probes-and-Spudgers/Nylon/35622/#.WuH1fcgh124

  11. JassMan Silver badge

    Cough. Splutter.

    £500+ just for a keyboard? That is 3 times the price I paid for my entire Acer laptop (£130). OK it is not so slim that you can use it as a steak knife but it does its job and is almost exactly the volume of 50 sheets of A4. Having thrown away Win10 and replaced it with Xubuntu so that I have space to store files locally instead of on the cloud, it is surprisingly quick and reliable. The only problem is the non-opensource driver for WiFi which causes freezes once or twice a week. Reboot is only 14 seconds so not much of an interruption.These crashes sometimes cause me to lose 30 seconds of work as EXT4 throws away inconsistent inodes but usually its just Firefoxe's information about the last tab opened.

  12. depicus

    Awful Keyboard of the Century.

    I have the MacBook Pro and can confirm it's keyboard is truly awful. I have a can of air on the shelf for a 4 month old laptop and it needs using every week to blow out crap so the keys work. Truly awful design.

    Contrast with my MacBook Air 2011 which still worked after trips to Africa and used on a bus with more red dust than Mars yet a Pro machine which never leaves the sofa craps out every few weeks.

  13. Jason Bloomberg Silver badge
    Joke

    "Any key is susceptible but it's the space bar that most commonly fails"

    So they actually have an "Any key" to press to continue in Mac land!

  14. tempemeaty
    FAIL

    ლ(ಠ益ಠლ)

    $700 keyboard !?

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA.......!

    NO!

  15. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    it's the os...

    Windows - no thanks.

    Linux - wish the DE and apps were more robust - still not ready for desktop prime time.

    Mac OSX - the best option of the bunch - imho.

    Probably why Apple doesn't allow their OS on commodity hardware...

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: it's the os...

      Mac OSX - the best option of the bunch - imho.

      Pfffft..... what a pile of shite. osx just happens to give the impression of stability because of the limited hardware it is made to work on.

      the only reason why linux will never be ready for prime time is that you need a certain level of know how to administer a Linux box.

      any idiot can use OSX and not break it, but underneath the polish is still unix.

      windows, love it or hate it for whatever reason, its the standard desktop environment, and will be for a long time to come.

      1. georgezilla

        Re: it's the os...

        " ... the only reason why linux will never be ready for prime time is that you need a certain level of know how to administer a Linux box. ... "

        No.

        You just need an I.Q. that is higher then 2 digits. And not being lazy.

        And the only reason Linux will never be ready for prime is because ... see the sentence proceeding this one.

    2. georgezilla

      Re: it's the os...

      " ... wish the DE and apps were more robust ... "

      Just what the hell does that mean?

  16. JeffyPoooh Silver badge
    Pint

    "...keyboard replacements are $700 (£502)."

    I believe that I may have spotted an issue here -^.

  17. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    But..but..but...

    I like to pay more for my tech so I can get a better resale value when I buy the next model Apple tell is better.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: But..but..but...

      I can get a better resale value when I buy the next model

      jokes aside, you cant argue that apple products hold the value. my daughter is a apple fangirl, since her very first iPhone 3GS, faithfully upgrading every 2 years... When it comes to selling on the old handset, she gets twice what I get for my far superior android offering.

      That said, I would NEVER buy a second hand mac or let my Daughter buy a second hand mac. you only have to look at the problems with mac books and realise many of them for sale are out of warrantee repairs, done with bits of wire to bridge rotten tracks. get it working and pass it on..

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: But..but..but...

        Faithfully upgrading every 2 years?

        She's one of the cult then.

  18. 89724905708169238590784I93056703497430967093434677347864785234986359235564854495684561564545876

    What the hell's happened to Apple?

    The trouble with gurus who choose their successors is that they invariably choose someone comparitively cr*p to take over, because of their essential failing: Narcissism. Gurus don't want to be outshone, even in death. Somethings rotten at Apple, unless they reanimate the body of Jobs which they have pickled in a secret chamber deep beneath the middle of the Apple saucer, I fear they are doomed to perpetual ineptitude or a terminal case of Microsoft.

  19. Cynicalmark
    WTF?

    Fit for purpose

    If you own one of these and are in the UK, you can invoke the ‘fit for purpose’ rule of the law.

    If you purchase something and through normal use - say typing regularly on a laptop keyboard and the keyboard stops working through no fault of the user (i.e. you didn’t play football with it; spill drink or drop food into it or use it for purpose other than what it was made for)

    Any sane person expects a keyboard to last more than a couple of years. I have one 6 odd years old and it still works fine.

    My old Dell laptop is older and they keyboard works fine too. It’s what anybody would expect.

    Look into it before forking out a few hundred quid to those money grabbing appleholes.

    1. Colin Wilson 2

      Re: Fit for purpose

      (i.e. you didn't ... drop food into it)

      There's the rub. How much food is reasonable.

      Ok - if you use it as a plate for your spaghetti bolognaise, you deserve to have it fail. But it would be reasonable to expect it to be resistant to a single biscuit crumb

  20. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    The most horrible Apple keyboard ever

    Apple always put so much effort into keyboard design, including feel, noise, etc. but this one is horrible. It's stiff, it's noisy, it becomes unreliable, it's uncomfortable. The iMac keyboards were the best.

  21. Craig (well, I was until The Reg changed it to Craig 16)

    Profit over everything

    I used to be an Apple junkie, my 2011 MacBook Pro was a thing of beauty with really high quality components, build and easy accessibility for upgrades/repairs. I could easily get it running four VMs at once if needed when doing non-performance simulations. It had a mid-life upgrade of a 1TB SSD in 2014-ish and that made it like a new machine outperforming most modern laptops I saw at the time. The discrete graphics card died last year but that's not surprising given I used it like a heavy-use desktop rather than laptop with constrained airflow and smaller scale components.

    The newer Apple computers (both desktops and laptops) are poor machines with usually one generation out technology, poor quality of components and an idiot obsession with slimness and locking the case away from heathen unclean owner hands. The Air is more than good enough for those who want an overpriced flip-top iPad, taking the MBP that way is an idiot move that alienated quite a lot of core fanbois like me; a good example is the fantastic maglock power cables that saved my laptop flying off the table many a time, replaced because the magnetic dock was too big for the newly anorexic frame. Also, far too many stories of simple problems you don't expect on premium kit.

    It's all down to the corporate folk who get chubbies on over profit rises every year and go out of their way to shave more off costs while looking for excuses to raise the prices yet again. I really don't mind paying premium prices but I want premium kit in return.

    I couldn't find a replacement I liked so ended up replacing my dead MBP with a £1000 big-brand gaming laptop. Excellent spec, equivalent to the near £3k MBP but just not as metallic and shiny. If it fails out of warranty, I'll just get the newer model and still have money left over to buy a third one in another year or so. I do miss working on the Apple OS rather than this Win10 asthmatic labrador of an OS, but that's an acceptable cost for not being treated like an idiot cash cow.

  22. Colin Wilson 2

    I quite like the keyboard...

    I quite like the keyboard on my 2016 MBP. It's positive and fast to type on, with good audible feeback (aka it's too clicky!)

    But I'm wating with bated breath for it to fail. Probably the day after my Applecare expires.

  23. jelabarre59 Silver badge

    Hackbook?

    At $700, you could get a decently specced commodity laptop NEW, and then just set the Macbook up as a desk-bound unit with an external keyboard. If you *really* needed MacOS, just Hackintosh that commodity one.

  24. Milton Silver badge

    I'll never leave mechanical again

    Can't comment on the Apple keyboards cos I don't own any overpriced Apple shinies, but I type a lot and confess that I had kind of gormlessly trailed along during a decade of computers with ever-cheaper keyboards (after all, it was the innards that counted, wasn't it? Wasn't it?), only pausing to reflect on what had happened to my typing skills and carpals when I was bashing away on some sub-£10 POS.

    It was my son, then about 11 years old, who demands only the very best for his gaming rigs (price of a small second hand car for a GPU?!?), who asked for a mechanical keyboard using Cherry mechanisms. I scoffed, argued, gave in (of course) and had an epiphany when the damn thing arrived: realised what I'd gradually sacrificed over the years.

    Now I do understand why it's worth paying £100—and I am a noted tightwad—for a well-built mechanical keyboard, and after five years of this one superb, flawlessly reliable Cherry-based clickety, I would never go back to those f***ing horrible rubber membrane things.

  25. CJ Hinke

    Well, yes, good enough reason buyers should ALWAYS spring for AppleCare.

    However, if your KB fails, after you've gotten and AppleCare case number and gotten a MASP to order you a new one, DON'T leave your Mac!

    Take it home and plug in an external keyboard to use until your repair shop calls you in.

  26. one crazy media

    Been using a MacBook Pro since it came out with the butterfly keyboard and touch bar. Haven't had a single problem.

    Do people bury it in a beach for a week, then complain about the QWERTY?

    Today, must be an Apple bashing day!

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2019