back to article The true victims of Brexit are poor RuneScape players

The creators of the popular online game RuneScape are raising subscription prices, and putting the blame on Nigel Farage and his Brexit buddies. Developers at UK-based Jagex say they are being forced to jack up the price for monthly game subscriptions in large part because of costs associated with the UK leaving the EU. …

  1. Steve Davies 3 Silver badge

    What a load of old cock

    to quote James May

    The Pound/Euro exchange rate has really not moved very much for around 20 months.

    What we should be ranting on about is all the prices of goods from say MS and Apple (and others) that went up quite sharply after the USD/GBP rate went south after the vote and why they have not revised them since yet the pound seems quite stable above £1/$1.40 level [1] which is pretty close to what it was pre-BREXIT vote.

    [1] This is always assuming that there is a world left next week once The Donald gets to play with his new 'smart missiles'. He's like a kid with a new toy at the moment but that is off topic.

    1. Voland's right hand Silver badge

      Re: What a load of old cock

      What we should be ranting on about is all the prices of goods from say MS and Apple (and others) that went up quite sharply after the USD/GBP rate went south after the vote and why they have not revised

      It is the cost of other goods. Basic groceries have gone up > 10% (or that is what the plot of my bills say). We have reached the point where you have to reflect this in the salaries or face a staff revolt. The inflation numbers for this year will not be pretty.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Basic groceries have gone up > 10%

        @Voland's right hand

        I have to disagree with you on that one. The only groceries that have gone up are brand name products from companies that like to profiteer. Everything else is pretty much the same, veg costs the same, fruit costs the same, own brand aldi products cost the same, meat costs the same. Maybe after Brexit that will change but for now I see no difference.

        The real reasons for differences in food prices whether up or down can be located here,

        https://www.thegrocer.co.uk/buying-and-supplying/commodities/

        It's a paywall site but the headlines tell you it's not brexit and most fluctuations are down to oil price.

        1. Jason Bloomberg Silver badge

          Re: Basic groceries have gone up > 10%

          The only groceries that have gone up are brand name products from companies that like to profiteer.

          It may be profiteering by someone but I am consistently seeing prices creep up by 5p or more every time I go to the supermarket, across a whole range of items, from all manufacturers. My local supermarket does a good job of hiding that by having a 'reduced price' period before putting prices up to more than they were before.

          Except basic rice which seems to have dropped in price lately. Getting us ready for a third-world post-brexit lifestyle perhaps.

    2. Dan 55 Silver badge

      Re: What a load of old cock

      Alternative Facts?

      It has never recovered from £1/€1.31 (at the moment it's at £1/€1.14) and as for $ it's only just managed to crawl back up to level it was on Mass Stupidity Day. A graph would be instructive and xe.com has them.

      1. Voland's right hand Silver badge

        Re: What a load of old cock

        Alternative Facts?

        It has never recovered from £1/€1.31

        It is a BrExiter colored post-truth, please do not try to repaint and fix it. Leave it as it is so we can observe idiotism in all of its glory.

        Like it or not what a GoveNocchio or Boris says, a BrExiter relays. Regardless of its veracity.

  2. Dan 55 Silver badge

    "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

    Wikipedia says most of the servers are in North America and the EU and I guess the depreciation of the pound is taking its toll.

    So this is yet another nationwide foot-gun inflicted enjoyment opportunity brought to you by The Will of The People™.

    1. JakeMS

      Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

      Well, the north American servers won't cost them a great deal more in terms of exchange rates.

      Before Brexit vote the exchange rate was 1 GBP to 1.48 USD. Today, 1 GBP is 1.42 USD. This is a minor difference, and before Brexit the exchange rate would go up and down anyway. This sort of change could have happened regardless of brexit (exchange rates change all the time)

      However, in terms of GBP to EUR, the pre-brexit exchange rate was 1 GBP to 1.30 EUR. Today it is 1 GBP to 1.15 EUR. This amount change is almost certainly entirely down to brexit.

      So realistically the biggest difference is with the EU servers perhaps costing more. So if this is all down to cost, most likely it is due to the cost of GBP to EUR.

      1. Voland's right hand Silver badge

        Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

        So realistically the biggest difference is with the EU servers

        Let me fix that for you: The biggest difference is with EU GROCERIES for which staff has to pay. You, then, have to pay the staff.

        Last time I checked groceries could not be located remotely and connected to over the Internet.

        I do most of the shopping in our household and based on our supermarket bills the cost of basic groceries has gone up by ~ 20% since BrExit. This is a number off the top of my head. I can pull the actual numbers from my account, they will be of that order or worse.

        1. Flatpackhamster

          Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

          'Groceries' is not a cost that the company has to bear. Of course the employees do but that doesn't increase the cost of the company doing business. It can choose to raise salaries or not. There's a price to pay for not raising them but given that salaries have been trailing inflation (except in a very few areas) for 10 years that isn't anything new.

          What might have increased their costs are the new employment regs including mandatory pensions for all employees.

          "Brexit" is just a convenient excuse, much like it was for a company near to me who went bust after taking a £100m loan to expand their business and then finding there wasn't the market for their products. They blamed Brexit rather than their own poor judgement.

          1. joeldillon

            Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

            ' It can choose to raise salaries or not.'

            Come on, this is bullshit. It can raise salaries, or it can have its developers jump ship to another company that will pay higher salaries and thus go out of business. Employees aren't slaves, you know, they don't have to work for you if they're taking a pay cut in real terms by doing so, and programmers are indeed in the 'very few areas' where salaries don't trail inflation because good programmers are rather hard to find.

        2. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

          <i.I do most of the shopping in our household and based on our supermarket bills the cost of basic groceries has gone up by ~ 20% since BrExit. </i>

          No it hasn't, because Brexit hasn't happened yet. The uncertainty over the exact form it will take certainly weighs on some things, as can be seen by the £/€ rate that is back at the same level as it was in 2014, and hasn't yet hit the peak it did at the end of 2015.

          Have you compared the grocery price changes in the UK with that in other countries? Prices of groceries tend to be very weather-dependent, and affected by oil (transportation) priciesI know that in France they have also increased. That is especially true if you prefer "organic" produce, which has seen a 10% increase over the past year.

          I know it's fashionable to blame everything bad on Brexit, but without valid control and comparison those numbers alone are meaningless.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

            I do love the way remainers think that downvoting facts will change them!

            1. JakeMS

              Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

              I should probably clarify I do not side with exit, or remain anymore. I was merely stating facts.

              I'm a strong supporter of democracy, freedom of choice etc.

              I held my view at the time, voted accordingly.

              However, as of right now the decision has been made. We voted, we got a result. Because I believe in democracy I am willing to accept the vote result and move on.

              It doesn't matter anymore if you think we should remain or leave.

              We are past that. Right now I care about what we do next, how we handle the situation and I care that we move forward and with the will of the people and make the best of it.

              Personally I wish people would stop being like children and arguing over past events and instead work together to ensure the best possible outcome and ensure that we have a better future.

              The longer we sit around arguing instead of making proper valid plans for the future, the worse brexit will be due to poor planning.

              1. Nick Ryan Silver badge

                Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

                The longer we sit around arguing instead of making proper valid plans for the future, the worse brexit will be due to poor planning

                Unfortunately it's rather more complicated than that.

                The brexit referendum: was only advisory, omitted a large number of otherwise normal UK voters and was a straight yes/no question where the issues were rather more complicated.

                The issue was compounded by some very rich people who felt that the EU's aim for more transparency, higher levels of equality and employer rights were directly impacting their personal finances. These people, through virtue of being very rich, have a lot of influence, effectively controlling mainstream media and therefore, through a long period of sustained lies (no - this is not emotive, this is fact) influenced a large enough number of UK voters to vote their way - usually using the racism card but also spreading lies about the negative impact of EU rules on the UK and the UK's soverignty.

                A lot of people were/are dissilusioned with UK politicians and used this as a protest vote, not realising that the EU's incoming and planned rules were to make politicians, EU-wide more accountable and politicis more transparent. How many criminal expense claims and similar events should UK politicians be able to brush over compared to how almost everyone else in the UK would find themselves jobless and in court?

                For the normal person, there are absolutely no benefits to be gained from leaving the EU - in fact, there are many, many disadvantages. For the very rich, the benefits are there through reduced employer rights and reduced (safety) regulations - neither of which benefit anyone else.

                All of this compounded by various illegal actions that took place and were arranged by prominent UK individuals. Laws around the transparency of the UK political process are there for a reason, bypassing these and influencing results illegally is a real offence against democracy. Unfortunately the perpetrators seem to be able to brush off anything they like, despite all evidence to the contrary.

                1. Andy 73

                  Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

                  @NickRyan - Do you need help with that tinfoil hat?

                2. Walter Bishop Silver badge

                  Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

                  @Nick Ryan: "The brexit referendum: was only advisory, omitted a large number of otherwise normal UK voters and was a straight yes/no question where the issues were rather more complicated."

                  The word 'advisory' doesn't appear anywhere in the act:

                  'An Act to make provision for the holding of a referendum in the United Kingdom and Gibraltar on whether the United Kingdom should remain a member of the European Union.' ref

                  'Those entitled to vote in the referendum are — (a) the persons who, on the date of the referendum, would be entitled to vote as electors at a parliamentary election in any constituency' ref

                  1. H in The Hague Silver badge

                    Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

                    "The word 'advisory' doesn't appear anywhere in the act:"

                    As Parliament is sovereign any referendum will always be advisory, there is no need to state that in the relevant act. (The PM at the time stated that this the government would abide by the result - but government <> Parliament.)

                    1. JakeMS

                      Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

                      Article 52 was triggered. This cannot be undone and we are required to leave once that times up.

                      We are well past referendums and leave or stay decisions.

                      We are leaving with or without a plan or deal (as per article 52 requirements).

                      We can sort some kind of deal and try to make things work, or we can argue and leave with no deal.

                      1. Dan 55 Silver badge

                        Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

                        s/52/50

                        1. Legal opinion is not clear on whether it can be withdrawn, many say it can, even the EU said it could.

                        2. The rest of the EU can vote to extend the two years if they vote unanimously, and that is what the transitional period is.

                3. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge

                  Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

                  Unfortunately it's rather more complicated than that.

                  No, it really isn't. The decision has been taken, it is incumbent on us all to make sure we get the best outcome from it, whether we like it or not. It's really just like after an election, you have to work to make the best of the result, because nothing else is constructive. What an old manager of mine used to call "disagree and commit".

                  The brexit referendum: was only advisory

                  So do you think people would have been happy if Cameron had said "Oh, you want to leave? Well, we're not going to, forget I asked". You don't hold referendums if you're going to ignore a result you don't like. If you just want advice, hire a polling company, their results you can ignore.

                  omitted a large number of otherwise normal UK voters

                  "otherwise normal"? What does that mean, and how were such people omitted? Everyone on the electoral register was entitled to vote.

                  and was a straight yes/no question where the issues were rather more complicated.

                  No, the issue was a simple yes/no, stay or leave. All the complicated issues are part of the negotiations and you can't hold a referendum on them because they have to be negotiated. It was, of course, up to the people who voted to look at the potential issues and decide how to vote based on them. Some did, some probably didn't, much like in an election.

                  1. Dan 55 Silver badge

                    Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

                    The decision has been taken

                    On an advisory vote, so badly drawn up as to threaten to split the UK up, and has been interpreted not to mean "Leave the European Union" (EU referendum ballot paper) but to "taking the opportunity of this great moment of national change to step back and ask ourselves what kind of country we want to be" (Mayhem, Lancaster House speech).

                    "Oh, you want to leave? Well, we're not going to, forget I asked".

                    Well it was called to stop the Tory party splitting and to keep their voters from defecting to UKIP. A referendum advises policy, government puts a bill before the house based on that policy, but Parliament always has the last word and has to balance the referendum with stuff like the national interest. They're not supposed to be nodding dogs.

                    What does that mean, and how were such people omitted? Everyone on the electoral register was entitled to vote.

                    Commonwealth residents were allowed to vote even if they can't. EU residents weren't allowed even though they can vote (local elections). A whole load of expats were excluded from the vote.

                    No, the issue was a simple yes/no, stay or leave.

                    If the question's as simple and as literal as on the ballot paper then we leave the EU but stay in the EEA, single market, and customs union.

                    "Ah, but that doesn't mean that..."

                  2. John Savard Silver badge

                    Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

                    Well, unfortunately there was no space on the ballot for "try to leave, but if you can't get a deal to stay in the Common Market on acceptable terms, then stay".

                    I mean, really: a deal should be negotiated, and then whether the economic terms are so onerous that leaving the European Union isn't worth it should be decided by another referendum. Voters shouldn't be forced to buy a pig in a poke.

                    Since the main concern is with control over immigration, and France has a similar problem - if Britain and France worked together, they would have had enough clout to negotiate a better deal. Or simply roll the EU back to the Common Market, which was as much European unity as most people wanted.

              2. Anonymous Coward
                Anonymous Coward

                Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

                > I care that we move forward and with the will of the people and make the best of it

                The will of the people is still against the brexit we appear to be on course to get.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

        the pre-brexit exchange rate was 1 GBP to 1.30 EUR.

        That's a very selective single data point. Let's look at the actual history:

        Dec 2008 1.023

        Dec 2009 1.113

        Dec 2010 1.16

        Dec 2011 1.196

        Dec 2012 1.223

        Dec 2013 1.198

        Dec 2014 1.276

        Dec 2015 1.357

        23 Jun 2016 1.31

        Dec 2016 1.173

        Dec 2017 1.126

        Today 1.145

        So apart from the jump around 2014/2015 the rate is where it was at the start of 2014, and no-one was whining about it then. Indeed in June 2014 the Guardian was proclaiming "Pound hits five-year high against euro and dollar" when it was only at 1.25.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

      Don't like democracy? Best to move somewhere else, then.

      1. jason 7

        Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

        They had democracy in Germany in the early 30's, didn't pan out so well.

        Just cos it's democratic doesn't mean its got a clean bill of health and certified "The Right Decision"

      2. Dan 55 Silver badge

        Re: "Jagex did not say exactly how Brexit will up its costs"

        Don't like democracy? Best to move somewhere else, then.

        I like democracy, I don't like idiocracy.

        That's a very selective single data point. Let's look at the actual history:

        Dec 2008 1.023

        Er, yeah. Just after the crash. Very non-selective. Let's look at the actual history:

        Jan 2007: 1.506984

        Apr 2007: 1.471493

        Jul 2007: 1.482623

        Oct 2007: 1.436291

        Jan 2008: 1.339853

        Apr 2008: 1.114106

        Jul 2008: 1.262073

        Oct 2008 1.274994

        Dec 2008: 1.104133 - Look here, it's always been low! We're doing better than ever!

        So what does this mean. We see two great troughs.

        1. 2008 financial crash

        2. Referendum vote (AKA Brexit).

        Link

        But I guess it's all in the presentation, as you were awarded 7 upvotes for your rubbish.

        Thanking you, AC.

      3. This post has been deleted by its author

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Trollface

    Funny...

    Firstly, dont know if anyone is actually aware, but Brexit hasnt actually happened yet.

    I know this because whenever there is any sort of good news this is what is used as the excuse.

    Any bad news "oh its Brexit!"

    Yeah, the market response to Brexit lasted all of a day as those factors were priced in by the big players, the next patch of uncertainty is when the deadline is actually up, the current economic issues have very little to do with Brexit and more to do with the general trend of world trade, but hey lets not waste a good opportunity to whine about the results of the first real act of democracy in this country since our (great) grand-parents.

    1. Dan 55 Silver badge
      Facepalm

      Re: Funny...

      The market response lasted all of a day, the fact that the currency exchange rates have been continually lower since the day the Brexit vote happened has nothing to do with the Brexit vote, neither do the facts that academic projects are ending and new ones aren't starting, investment is on hold, and businesses that can are making plans for leaving.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Trollface

        Re: Funny...

        "A weaker pound" - is suddenly bad for the economy?

        "academic projects are ending and new ones aren't starting" - oh no Communists will have to find actual jobs.

        "investment is on hold" - no it isnt.

        "businesses that can are making plans for leaving." - predominantly banks, I'll try not to cheer as that happens.

    2. Triggerfish

      Re: Funny...

      Yeah, the market response to Brexit lasted all of a day as those factors were priced in by the big players, the next patch of uncertainty is when the deadline is actually up, the current economic issues have very little to do with Brexit and more to do with the general trend of world trade

      Erm no the market response is still happening, it doesn't last just a day.

      "A weaker pound" - is suddenly bad for the economy?

      Yep can be we buy a lot of stuff in, including raw materials for manufacturing, the myth that cos the pound is cheaper our goods will be cheaper is not exactly correct due to this. Abroad you have less spending power.

      "academic projects are ending and new ones aren't starting" - oh no Communists will have to find actual jobs.

      You're right new tech, products and innovation make no difference to an economy. We do not need to create the next ARM holdings we can all work at McD's

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Trollface

        Re: Funny...

        "Erm no the market response is still happening, it doesn't last just a day." - So your saying that the market is due to an ongoing 'general trend of world trade', geez thanks for filling me in mister..

        "Yep can be we buy a lot of stuff in, including raw materials for manufacturing, the myth that cos the pound is cheaper our goods will be cheaper is not exactly correct due to this. Abroad you have less spending power." - You have this backwards, this isnt good for the Buy side, this is good for the Sell side, this will encourage more industry to pick up and grow national industry and resources.

        "You're right new tech, products and innovation make no difference to an economy. We do not need to create the next ARM holdings we can all work at McD's" - fuck off! this isnt big companies that are holding development, its a bunch of "academic's" leeching off the public purse. If we actually helped people start the next ARM holdings that would be a different matter

        1. Triggerfish

          Re: Funny...

          So are you saying you do understand there can be general trends that last long but the effect of Brexit only lasted on the day of announcement?

          Ill just repeat this bit - we buy a lot of stuff in, including raw materials for manufacturing, the myth that cos the pound is cheaper our goods will be cheaper is not exactly correct due to this.

          *fuck off! this isnt big companies that are holding development, its a bunch of "academic's" leeching off the public purse.*

          Like what?

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Trollface

            Re: Funny...

            "effect of Brexit" - Like this is ONLY due to the effect of Brexit, like there isnt anything else going on in the world that would cause effects, the markets reacted and got over it, the effects of Brexit at this point are of little consequence compared to say the possibility of a Major war about to break out. - No its Brexit..

            "Ill just repeat this bit" - No let me repeat it, in the long term this should benefit us, growing our national industries rather than relay on imports.

            "Like what?" - Like what? why dont you ask the person who made the point? I'm sure he can point to a few that are directly or indirectly funded by government aka the taxpayer.

            1. Triggerfish

              Re: Funny...

              "effect of Brexit" - Like this is ONLY due to the effect of Brexit, like there isnt anything else going on in the world that would cause effects, the markets reacted and got over it, the effects of Brexit at this point are of little consequence compared to say the possibility of a Major war about to break out. - No its Brexit..

              I did not say that it's the only reason. I was pointing out you said the effects lasted a day.

              "Ill just repeat this bit" - No let me repeat it, in the long term this should benefit us, growing our national industries rather than relay on imports.

              How does this work? Where do we get raw materials from? Please explain why long term it's better for us? Willing to listen.

              "Like what?" - Like what? why dont you ask the person who made the point?

              That was you in an earlier post.

        2. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Funny...

          "fuck off! this isnt big companies that are holding development, its a bunch of "academic's" leeching off the public purse. If we actually helped people start the next ARM holdings that would be a different matter"

          You are an ignorant tosser and I claim my £5

  4. Andy 73

    Lots of Independent readers in today :)

    If you read the Guardian or Independent, food prices have gone through the roof, the exchange rate has plummeted and the world is about to end...

    For a service like Jagex, an exchange rate drop is usually strongly advantageous - the majority of their customers likely being outside of the UK.

    Of course it's entirely possible they are running a global business in a way that is badly hit by local fluctuations in costs/currency. Given how old the game is, they should have sorted that out a long time ago.

    As for food prices, after a couple of years' historic low, the CPI has returned to the previous decade's norm (old link, but: http://uk.businessinsider.com/brexit-uk-inflation-in-october-2017 ) Though Jagex do offer to feed their developers (part of the kindly "please work round the clock for no financial advantage" style of games studio), I doubt food costs have actually affected their bottom line.

    But I guess if you want to hike the price of a game that costs about the same as a Netflix subscription, you have to blame *something*.

    1. Voland's right hand Silver badge

      Re: Lots of Independent readers in today :)

      For a service like Jagex, an exchange rate drop is usually strongly advantageous - the majority of their customers likely being outside of the UK.

      Game is not a service from a financials perspective. Its primary costs are graphic design, world design and AI/interaction software development. These are incurred where they are located and they are 100% UK based - off the A14 in Cambridge.

      The cost of servers are secondary. We can look it up in their accounts in Company house - these should be in a different item line so we can guess the staff costs vs service running costs ratio.

      1. Andy 73

        Re: Lots of Independent readers in today :)

        It's a service. People pay to play. Unless they are charging foreign players in GBP, a drop in exchange rate means that a $X USD subscription brings in more GBP than it did before.

        The wage bill in the UK has been pretty much stagnant for the last couple of years - and I know full well where they're based.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Lots of Independent readers in today :)

          @Andy 73

          That's all well and good applying logic and common sense but we are talking about brexit so that goes right out of the window. Hence the inclusion of grocery costs further up in the comments which are irrelevant, I haven't seen mine increase, in fact depending on what you buy and where from it's gone down.

    2. codejunky Silver badge

      Re: Lots of Independent readers in today :)

      @Andy 73

      "Lots of Independent readers in today :)"

      I think the regs new leaning is trying to steer that way. God knows why as the independent is ruined and the guardian begging visitors for money. I expect we will see more as time goes on.

  5. This post has been deleted by its author

  6. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Who would pay for online stuff anyway?

    It's the one thing I don't get. Sure, I also play a few freemium browser games and they can definitely be fun. And I can definitely understand and support a small donation to get some better items and also help support running the game.

    But there are games which take on donations starting around E 50,-. That's nearly the price you'd pay for a premium game. And what do you get after you've made such payments? Nothing. Everything you "own" is purely virtual, so the very moment they turn off the switch for whatever reason you'll be left in the dark and without your money's worth. Welcome to modern gameplay?

    With the old fashioned (and probably boring?) concept of actually buying a game and getting physical media you can play your game for as long as you'd like. Want to 'donate' more? Look into DLC, most often that can even help you to get even more out of your game. But paying heavily for online contents?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Who would pay for online stuff anyway?

      Alas, these games are designed to be addictive. They are quite close to gambling. Google "loot boxes". Avoid.

    2. Ian Emery Silver badge

      Re: Who would pay for online stuff anyway?

      Game makers were facing a quandary; pirates were too good at cracking copy protection, and on line games required constant support and moderation which required humans - who for some reason want to be paid.

      So the games were sold cheap and a subscription - along the lines of todays mobile game "micro-transactions", introduced to pay for the upkeep of the servers and the staff.

      Sadly, some game companies are now getting greedy, and recent expansions for some of these popular games are being charged at prices unseen before.

      (At launch last year, the average* cost of the Mordor expansion for LOTRO was nearly £100).

      * 3 types of package, from basic to premium.

    3. Roj Blake Silver badge

      Re: Who would pay for online stuff anyway?

      For offline games, sure, you're right.

      But MMOs have running costs (servers aren't free) and they tend to undergo continual balancing and development (the decent ones, anyway).

      Personally, I much prefer the subscription model, but freemium seems to be the way things have gone over the last decade or so.

  7. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Jagex are based in Cambridge, on the science park. They pay their developers in pounds sterling. They accept payments overseas via services like Paypal. They don't HAVE any "costs" overseas that aren't more than covered by overseas revenue.

    Just a bunch of lying toerags who don't like democracy.

    1. This post has been deleted by a moderator

      1. deconstructionist

        do you need a ladder or a cherry picker to reach your horse

        Your very vapid post makes me feel very sad indeed that we breathe the same air, Democracy is exactly what it is having worked and serviced the behemoth that has become Brussels, that is where democracy died .

        I wont even quote the absurd nonsense that goes on all while the world grows darker our seas fill with corpses of children , and we watch the opposite shore and see spring turn to winter upon a sea of hands reaching out and will build fences to meet them rain death behind them so that none will follow.

        I made a decision based on knowledge, experience and to add these words "not in my name".

        1. Lars Silver badge
          Happy

          Re: do you need a ladder or a cherry picker to reach your horse

          "Democracy is exactly what it is having worked and serviced the behemoth that has become Brussels, that is where democracy died .".

          I have no doubt you made your decision based on your knowledge and experience. But there are also those who have more knowledge and experience and can explain from where that knowledge and experience came. Can you.

          Try https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pI54yarKz_o

          There is some spice I like in this speech.

      2. codejunky Silver badge

        @ Nick Ryan

        "Democracy doesn't mean doing one thing and never changing it, nor adapting it. Democracy is about doing what is right for the country and for the people, and being able to change what needs to be done as circumstances dictate"

        If that is your interpretation of democracy I hope you are the only one. Democracy isnt about what is doing right for the country and the people (by who's dictatorship ideals?). It is about majority rule. The people being free and right to vote for what they perceive to be the best way forward. A group responsibility of action.

        What you seem to be defining is 'benevolent' dictatorship where you assume you are right about what is good under the circumstances and enforce it on the rest of us.

        "Is the reality of brexit a total disaster or epic proportions "

        No. So far things are pretty good, there is little reason to believe it will go bad unless we change our mind and remain. For the gov to claim noticeable damage to the UK they had to make their predictions for 2030. The economy is returning to normal after the fall in currency. The empty threats that the EU will knacker us has been shown to be rubbish and we will only be knackered by agreeing to EU demands to hobble our country (even by their own admittance).

        So you were saying something about how you believe it is bad?

      3. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge

        Democracy is about doing what is right for the country and for the people,

        Technically it is about letting the people choose. In a representative democracy like the UK it is for the elected representatives to do what they think people want, and if they aren't sure they can always ask by holding a referendum or an election. The attitude of "doing what is right for the country and for the people" is most definitely NOT democracy, it is at best paternalism, and at worst totalitarianism. It is exactly that arrogance of "doing what is right for the people" (whether they want it or not) that puts so many people off the EU and its style of government, and has led to Brexit.

  8. Fading Silver badge
    Paris Hilton

    Lazy excuses

    Just blame Brexit (tm) or Climate Change (tm) and you don't have to explain anything as the usual suspects will leap to your defense all over the internet forums and social media.

    But before accepting the current zeitgeist excuses could someone please ask how?

    These are big enough and ugly enough companies to defend themselves so could someone ask How a "not happened yet" event is linked to Jagex's price increase? Inquiring minds wish to know.

    1. Naselus

      Re: Lazy excuses

      "These are big enough and ugly enough companies to defend themselves so could someone ask How a "not happened yet" event is linked to Jagex's price increase?"

      You know, it says a lot about the mentality of the average Leave voter that the very concept of planning ahead for a foreseeable event occurring in the next twelve months seems absurd to them.

      1. Fading Silver badge

        Re: Lazy excuses

        QED

  9. Walter Bishop Silver badge
    Facepalm

    Brexit to blame for RuneScape price hike

    Jacking up RuneScape prices using Brexit as a pretext. How exactly does the UK leaving Europe going to affect prices for a server most probably sited anywhere on the planet, is the island going to be towed out into the Atlantic. Tell me how running a RuneScape server post-Brexit is somehow more expensive than pre-Brexit. Does it use non-Brexit electricity and telecom connectivity?

    1. This post has been deleted by its author

  10. Tim Jenkins

    Chance to parry?

    Oh, RuneScape

    For a minute there I thought we were talking about RuneQuest.

    Carry on.

    1. Jellied Eel Silver badge

      Re: Chance to parry?

      Whatever happened to that? It was my first RPG.. and one where you could almost take an arrow to the knee!

  11. John Savard Silver badge

    Wondering

    I was wondering why there was a second price increase since I began playing. I had not thought of the unforeseen event of Brexit as being the cause.

  12. This post has been deleted by a moderator

    1. LucreLout Silver badge

      Re: Load of old bollocks IMHO

      A Pound will not even buy you a pound of tripe post Brexit, which is a shame because that seems to be the staple food stuff of the idiots who voted to restore the empire and kick out the fuzzy wuzzies

      ???!

      So in your small minded and exceptionally narrow view, everyone who voted to leave the EU is racist? Ok, why?

      I voted to leave and my wife is an immigrant from the EU. Explain to me how your warped little mind parses that. I'll clue you in - lots of people voted leave and didn't give a fig about immigration; certainly it didn't feature on my list of reasons for voting.

      Calling someone a racist incorrectly and without a shred of evidence is in every single way worse than actually being a racist. You should be ashamed of yourself.

  13. NerryTutkins

    let's not worry

    I think remainers should give up, at least until April next year.

    Just let May and the whole clown car get on with it. I mean, they're getting a total kicking from the EU, but that's because the EU knows the UK is bluffing about walking away. Because the UK has done absolutely nothing to actually prepare for hard brexit. No investment in port facilities, no new computer systems, no tenders for new computer systems, no new customs staff hired, no extra training, no training and information to UK companies on how to handle export paperwork, etc. It needs years of preparation, and they've done nothing more than absolutely fuck all.

    It's pretty clear the UK has no choice but to utterly capitulate, because brexit as well as being a clownish idea, is being implemented by the very same clowns who pushed it in the first place. And they haven't got a fucking clue.

    They'll either sign a completely one sided deal with the EU out of sheer desperation, that basically is EU membership in all but name (and voting rights) - just so they can say they delivered - or they'll cancel it. Because 'no deal' would be akin to an economic blockade, and the UK would collapse in a month or two, if it didn't starve first.

    The EU is a rules-based organization, with 27 remaining members, so it's simply not able to play fast and loose with its rules to accommodate the UK's desires. The UK on the other hand can do whatever it needs to do, and will do. Humiliating as it will be.

    So just chill. Less than a year to go before Johnson, Gove and co's lies and impossible promises are laid bare for all to see.

    1. H in The Hague Silver badge

      Re: let's not worry

      "... has done absolutely nothing to actually prepare for hard brexit. ... no new customs staff hired"

      Actually they're busy hiring 800 folk for Customs and 143 agricultural/phytosanitary inspectors.

      https://fd.nl/economie-politiek/1247554/in-het-slechtste-scenario-krijg..

      Oh, hang on, that's the NL government's preparation for Brexit.

  14. ABowler
    Coat

    I wonder if this means my Granite Maul and Rune Armour set has fallen in value?

    1. John Savard Silver badge

      Probably not, but when they let people mine runite ore with only 60 Mining instead of 85 Mining, your rune armour will drop in value terribly - what with the upcoming Mining and Smithing rework.

  15. Sorry that handle is already taken. Silver badge

    Jagex says that, as of June 4, the cost of a one-month membership in the US will go up to £6.99, while three-month memberships charges rise to £18.99 and one year of gameplay now costs £62.99 per person.

    Okay, those are the new prices. What are the old prices?

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