back to article Fancy a viaduct? We have a wrought Victorian iron marvel to sell you

The pell-mell expansion of Britain's railways in the 19th century has bequeathed some impressive feats of engineering. Great stone viaducts like those at Calstock in Cornwall and Harringworth near Melton Mowbray get the glory, but for my money it's the iron bridges that are the real marvels. Many centuries earlier the Romans …

  1. Steve Davies 3 Silver badge

    Wonderful!

    Great article and beautifully told..

    It is a shame that Sustrans aren't going ahead with the project. Now it will be left to decay even further.

    Sustrans own a lot of former rail tracks that they seem to blow hot and cold over and end up doing nothing.

    1. paulf Silver badge
      Thumb Up

      Re: Wonderful!

      Fascinating article - thank you. This article made me think of the viaduct at Meldon Quarry very early on, so I'm glad the author has mentioned this. For those that don't know, it's on the former LSWR/SR route from Exeter to Plymouth that ran around the north of Dartmoor (the SDR/GWR ran along the south of Dartmoor and includes the well known section along the coast at Dawlish). It's now at the end of the route from Crediton to Okehampton which sees services in the Summer by mainline operator GWR. Since it's not far from the A30 it's worth a visit although, sadly, it's hardly visible from the road. It now forms part of a Sustrans route so you can cycle across it and I'm glad to say it's in much better condition than Bennerley Viaduct is at present.

      Sustrans have been gifted a lot of former railway property and assets in preference to other groups, in some cases. There are instances where railway preservation groups wanted to acquire old lines from the former BR and were told the cost would be tens of thousands. When they declined the lines were then gifted to Sustrans for a nominal (i.e. £1) cost. Considering this head start they don't really have much excuse and should have been in a position to do more with assets like Bennerley Viaduct.

      1. Symon Silver badge
        Go

        Re: Wonderful!

        If you feel particularly energetic, you can take your bike on the train to Okehampton, follow National Cycle Route 27 across the Meldon viaduct and then onto Tavistock, passing Lydford Castle and through Lydford Gorge, turn off to Gunnislake, quite hilly this bit, and then Calstock, then catch the train at Calstock and go across the stone viaduct into Plymouth. Pick a sunny day! Plenty of pubs on the way.

        1. Nick Kew Silver badge

          Re: Wonderful!

          If you feel particularly energetic, you can take your bike on the train to Okehampton, follow National Cycle Route 27 across the Meldon viaduct and then onto Tavistock, passing Lydford Castle and through Lydford Gorge,

          Indeed you can, and then the Plym Valley trail from Tavistock to Plymouth is another option, including an impressive newly-built bridge high above the Walkham valley and several old regular stone bridges, with lots of fine views.

          To do the Calstock Viaduct, you can get on the train from either Gunnislake or Calstock, That stretch of the Tamar is more a gorge than a mere valley, and the views are worth taking in (though sadly the train line misses those views except at Calstock). There's also a much lower but longer (iron) viaduct on that line, from the Bere peninsula across the estuary of the Tavy and Tamerton Lake into the Plymouth suburbs.

          Those of us who live in this part of the country desperately want our railway back: Plymouth to Exeter via Tavistock and Okehampton (i.e. skirting Dartmoor to the West and North). That way, even if it's just a single line with speed restrictions, we're not completely cut off whenever today's line succumbs to the sea around Dawlish/Teignmouth. This would imply re-opening the Meldon Viaduct.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Wonderful!

      And if American, we can also sell you Nelsons column, Tower Bridge, etc. etc. for cash. Not your monopoly money though - Pounds sterling only. Just ask for Arthur Furguson.

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Wonderful!

      Sustrans own a lot of former rail tracks that they seem to blow hot and cold over and end up doing nothing.

      As a charity they are reliant upon somebody else finding the money for their hobbies. Sadly my hobbies don't get sponsored with other people's money.

    4. MJI Silver badge

      Re: Wonderful!

      I am not a Sustrans fan.

      They hate railway preservation projects getting the track beds.

      They also get preference sometimes over them.

      They tried screwing over a railway I have been involved in, but they are likely to get screwed back as a cycle path from a mainline station to a preserved railway station is not exactly useful.

      They were once campaigning to take over the whole line as cycle path but I remember telling members no chance, it is ours not yours.

      1. matjaggard

        Re: Wonderful!

        You're right of course, but sustrans have also done some really lovely and useful things with old railways. Occasionally they've left one of two tracks and built and cycle and footpath in the place of the other.

        I'm interested to see how the varsity line comes along now that sustrans have used the old location as a cycle path. (But why did it ever close? Even Dr Beeching thought it should remain)

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Wonderful!

          I'm interested to see how the varsity line comes along now that sustrans have used the old location as a cycle path.

          Hopefully they'll be booted off the old trackbed if it is needed, since the economic value of a decent rail link far outweighs a few early-retired pensioners piffling recreationally along on two wheels. Just as Sustains got the line for a song when theirs was the best use of it, likewise they should cede it in turn to anybody with a better use.

          1. boltar Silver badge

            Re: Wonderful!

            "Hopefully they'll be booted off the old trackbed if it is needed, since the economic value of a decent rail link far outweighs a few early-retired pensioners piffling recreationally along on two wheels."

            Well said. There is a desperate need for restored rail links around the UK yet every track bed that hasn't been completely trashed by later building work gets turned into a sodding cycle path that gets used by about 3 people and a lost dog each day. Even in London routes such as the old alexandra palace line which is complete except for about 100m would be a godsend for people who live in the muswell hill area, but no, its a leisure footpath. Instead commuters have to squeeze onto overcrowded buses that go 20m and get stuck in a traffic jam. What a fucking waste.

            1. GrahamRJ

              Re: Wonderful!

              This would be the same London which has 250 miles of underground railway network going basically everywhere?

              As someone who does a lot of walking and has walked a fair amount of London paths (my other half runs a walking group based loosely around the capital), footpaths are actually more dangerous than roads. Bike ownership is *high*, and good quality paths mean those bikes get used for everyday transport.

              Anyone stuck on a bus in a traffic jam has only themselves to blame.

              1. boltar Silver badge

                Re: Wonderful!

                "This would be the same London which has 250 miles of underground railway network going basically everywhere?"

                It doesn't go everywhere and barely makes it into south london at all. Perhaps you should take a look at London on the map - its quite large and also has pretty horrendous traffic jams plus north london is very hilly in parts with some roads being a 1 in 10.

                "Bike ownership is *high*, and good quality paths mean those bikes get used for everyday transport."

                By a fraction of a percent of the population.

                "Anyone stuck on a bus in a traffic jam has only themselves to blame."

                What a fuckwitted statement. Are the disabled, elderly and everyone else who doesn't want to get up at the crack of dawn and get sweaty/cold/wet/dirty/killed supposed to get a on bike or walk for 2 hours to work just because you seem to think its more virtuous? You're an ass.

          2. Roland6 Silver badge

            Re: Wonderful!

            >I'm interested to see how the varsity line comes along now that Sustrans have used the old location as a cycle path.

            Well given the Oxford to Milton Keynes part of the East West Rail Link (formerly the Varsity Line) will open in 2019, the mess of the Central section (Bedford to Cambridge) urgently needs resolving, where the original trackbed has largely been lost to The Ryle Telescope, the Cambridgeshire Guided Busway, National Cycle Route 51 and housing at Potton and Sandy. Perhaps they need to follow the example of HS2 and simply announce they are going to use the original trackbed/route and proceed regardless...

  2. Thoguht Silver badge

    The silv'ry Tay

    "...a delicate iron latticework bridge that looks far too insubstantial to carry a thundering locomotive and its string of carriages and wagons?"

    And indeed the first Tay Bridge was too insubstantial. Or at least it was when a force 11 wind was blowing against it.

    1. Alan J. Wylie

      The Great McGonagall

      The Tay Bridge Disaster

      Almost as bad as the Vogons'.

      Beautiful Railway Bridge of the Silv’ry Tay!

      Alas! I am very sorry to say

      That ninety lives have been taken away

      On the last Sabbath day of 1879,

      Which will be remember’d for a very long time.

      1. Voyna i Mor Silver badge

        Re: The Great McGonagall - Almost as bad as the Vogons'.

        There is a much, much better poem about the Tay Bridge disaster in German, by Theodor Fontane

        Full text

        "Wann treffen wir drei wieder zusamm?"

        "Um die siebente Stund',am Brückendamm."

        "Am Mittelpfeiler."

        "Ich lösche die Flamm."

        "Ich mit."

        "Ich komme vom Norden her."

        "Und ich vom Süden."

        "Und ich vom Meer."

        "Hei das gibt ein Ringelreihn,

        und die Brücke muß in den Grund hinein."

        "Und der Zug, der in die Brücke tritt

        um die siebente Stund'?"

        "Ei der muß mit."

        Even if you don't know German you can probably get the gist of the first verse.

        It was, however, Sir George Airey and his Dunning-Kruger about Scottish wind velocities that actually did for the bridge, not the witches from the Scottish play.

    2. Inspector71

      Re: The silv'ry Tay

      As a Dundonian every time I go down Riverside the old pillars that remain from that bridge always catch the eye.

      1. EddieD

        Re: The silv'ry Tay

        Boring but true - if you look at the Forth Bridge, underneath the middle span, you'll see an identical pillar to the ones from the fateful Tay Bridge - they were about to build a bridge to the exact same design across the Forth when the Beautiful Railway Bridge of the Silv’ry Tay went kersplat.

  3. Anonymous Custard Silver badge
    Headmaster

    Another one for the glory list

    One other example (this time in brick and stone) is the Ouse Valley Viaduct (aka the Balcombe Viaduct) in Sussex, between Balcombe and Haywards Heath.

    It's another stunner of a hidden gem. In terms of magnificent architecture it's great, at least now they've fixed it up after a sad number of decades of neglect (which was kinda worrying given it carries the main line between London and Brighton).

    But if you're driving down towards HH from the East Grinstead/Crawley/Gatwick area via the backroads (rather than the M23) it's a wonderful surprise to go round a bend or two in the tree-lined road and then suddenly this beauty appears in front of you (and indeed over you, as the road goes through one of its arches).

  4. Andrew Newstead

    Just up the road...

    Thanks for this article. I live just to the west of this in Derby. A thing that you might be interested to know is that Derby also has a good industrial museum as well as Nottingham. Situated in the old Silk Mill building, considered to be the first factory in the world! Well worth a visit.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Just up the road...

      I wish they'd turn the Monsal Trail back into a proper railway or hand it over to Peak Rail, it would arguably be the finest scenic railway in England and take some cars off the road in the Peaks.

      1. Alister Silver badge

        Re: Just up the road...

        I wish they'd turn the Monsal Trail back into a proper railway or hand it over to Peak Rail

        Sadly, too many vested interests, not least the Duke of Rutland, who, like his father, cannot see the benefits that the railway would bring to Haddon.

        And frankly, the current idea of having dual use through the tunnels just shows how out of touch the planners are - how can you put cyclists/walkers and steam locomotives in the same tunnel?

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Just up the road...

          "how can you put cyclists/walkers and steam locomotives in the same tunnel?"

          Putting them in the same tunnel is pretty easily done. But my money is on the locomotive for coming back out again.

        2. MJI Silver badge

          Re: Just up the road...

          Easy put the cyclists in a brake coach

          1. ButlerInstitute

            Re: Just up the road...

            And noting that dual-use, sharing a bridge between road and rail, does exist. I saw one in New Zealand. I think the one I saw was Taramakau Road-Rail Bridge.

            https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@-42.5610788,171.1453183,17z?hl=en

            1. Roland6 Silver badge
              Pint

              Re: Just up the road...

              >And noting that dual-use, sharing a bridge between road and rail, does exist. I saw one in New Zealand.

              You don't have to go half-way round the world!

              Welsh Highland Railway goes all the way for first time (well after a break of 79 years)

              Ffestiniog Railway Harbour Station

  5. Missing Semicolon Silver badge

    Location typo

    The lat/long in TFA is in the Channel.

    Google satellite view has it at 52.9905,-1.295

    52.988776,-1.299691 seems to be where it crosses the main railway line.

  6. ofnuts

    That's cute.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garabit_viaduct

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      >That's cute.

      Mere imitation, the original that changed the face of viaduct building:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Iron_Bridge

      1. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge

        Darby's Iron Bridge was cast iron, not wrought iron, though.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          >Darby's Iron Bridge was cast iron, not wrought iron, though.

          That's because the puddling process was yet to be invented.

  7. Colin Bull 1
    Happy

    Cornish 2 for 1

    Cornwall has 2 of its own favourite relics next to each other. Both still in working order!

    Trago mills - Cornwall's favourite place to shop and the St Pinnock viaduct.

    From Wikipedia - Milepost 269.5, 1.25 miles (2.0 km) west of Doublebois above the Trago Mills out-of-town shopping complex. (50.453064°N 4.568532°W)

    A Class B viaduct 151 feet (46 m) high and 633 feet (193 m) long on 9 piers. It was rebuilt by raising the piers and replacing the timber with iron girders in 1882. This is the tallest viaduct on the Cornwall Railway. The line was singled over this viaduct on 24 May 1964 to reduce the load on the structure.[43] This was listed Grade II in 1985.[44]

    1. Korev Silver badge
      WTF?

      Re: Cornish 2 for 1

      "Trago mills - Cornwall's favourite place to shop."

      Mmmm I think not.

      Have they got planning permission yet?

  8. andy gibson

    Forgotten Relics

    For a great list of other industrial relics around the UK, have a look at this site:

    http://www.forgottenrelics.co.uk/

    1. Steve Davies 3 Silver badge

      Re: Forgotten Relics

      It is a pity that the site needs the dreaded 'Adobe Flash' to show details of many of the relics.

      Adobe Flash will never be a 'forgotten relic'.

      1. Tom 7 Silver badge

        Re: Forgotten Relics

        True - I doubt if people will be waking in the middle of the night in 50 years time screaming "delicate iron latticework".

  9. Daedalus Silver badge

    Why a duck?

    Last time I checked the Romans didn't build viaducts per se. Aqueducts, yes.

    1. Hans Neeson-Bumpsadese Silver badge

      Re: Why a duck?

      OK, so apart from the aqueducts, what have the Romans ever done for us?

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        What have the Romans ever done for us?

        Well, there are still some bridges - are any in the UK? When i was a kid, we were told a bridge in Huntingdon was built by the Romans with areas for sentries - but apparently that wasn't so.

      2. The Nazz Silver badge

        Re: Why a duck?

        "What have the Romans ever done for us?"

        Well, speaking personally ....(excerpt)

        You may be very clever

        But however

        Can't you see

        My heart beats much too much

        At a certain tender touch

        It goes boom boody-boom boody-boom boody-boom

        Boody-boom boody-boom boody-boom-boom-boom

        Boom boody-boom boody-boom boody-boom

        What a stunning woman, this one Roman has done much for my cardiovascular system. Not to mention my plumbing.

        1. Daedalus Silver badge

          Re: Why a duck?

          "boom boody-boom et al"

          Well, goodness gracious me!

          (Had to do it)

          Brandyyyy!

    2. Al Taylor

      Re: Why a duck?

      Granted aqueducts are the more direct architectural comparison but I was also thinking about the likes of the Puente Romano in Mérida and Trajan's Bridge at Alcantara. I reckon Caius Julius Lacer you designed the latter could have put up a decent stone railway viaduct if he'd been asked.

    3. Alan Johnson

      Re: Why a duck?

      "Last time I checked the Romans didn't build viaducts per se. Aqueducts, yes."

      Yes they did although they did not call them viaducts. At the end of the day a viaduct is just a bridge to carry a road and they made a lot more of them than they did aqueducts. There are many still standing and in use some very long.

  10. synaesthesia

    Curiously I was only out there a few weeks ago flying my new drone for the third time...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPZhX-xmofk

  11. MJI Silver badge

    Nice piccies as well.

    Nice pair of 20s

    And is that an 03 or 04?

    1. paulf Silver badge
      Go

      Re: Nice piccies as well.

      It does look like two 20s in multiple. Fine locos and (I’m lucky to say) rather nice to drive too!

      1. MJI Silver badge

        Re: Nice piccies as well.

        I remember the BR blue era fondly.

        20s were not that common where I lived, but often 1 or a pair around, my area was 37 Peak 47 mainly, and occasional 50.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Coat

          Re: Nice piccies as well.

          20s were not that common where I lived, but often 1 or a pair around, my area was 37 Peak 47 mainly, and occasional 50.

          You lightweight youngsters, with your false gods!

          Nothing touches a green Deltic, I remember them on the ECML. Mine's an anorak, used to an ABC in the pocket, these days you'd expect a packet of Werthers.

          1. Voyna i Mor Silver badge

            Re: Nice piccies as well.

            "Nothing touches a green Deltic, I remember them on the ECML. "

            That's because they're back in the sheds with the engine gone back to Napiers for servicing.

            The Russians got a BMW failed aero Diesel and made it into the most reliable tank engine of WW2.

            BR got a Napier failed aero Diesel and turned it into something almost as unreliable as a steam engine, but with a host of moving parts that made it factory service only.

            1. MJI Silver badge

              Re: Nice piccies as well.

              Deltic was a step change in locomotive design.

              Went from US locos like the 3000bhp 2DoDo2 over 200 tons, to the 3300bhp 105ton prototype Deltic in a couple of years.

            2. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Re: Nice piccies as well.

              "BR got a Napier failed aero Diesel"

              No they didn't, BR got a successful high output marine diesel, specifically designed for naval requirements. Whilst Junkers tried and failed to make an opposed stroke diesel aero engine, Napiers produced a versatile, compact, high power unit that actually worked, merely borrowing the concept of an opposed stroke diesel and then conceiving the rest themselves.

              Factory exchange was a sensible choice because (for the day) the high speed and power output meant it needed full overhauls more frequently than the dismal slow revving alternatives. The RN still have some Deltic powered vessels.

  12. Roland6 Silver badge

    Nitpick..

    Great stone viaducts like those at Calstock in Cornwall and Harringworth near Melton Mowbray get the glory

    You'll find Harringworth is closer to Corby, not sure why Melton Mowbray was even mentioned.

    1. Steve Davies 3 Silver badge
      Facepalm

      Re: Melton Mowbray

      It was mentioned because of the pies silly. Where would the world be without a proper handmade Pork Pie from Melton Mowbray?

    2. Al Taylor

      Re: Nitpick..

      It came down to the pies. It's my only excuse.

      1. Roland6 Silver badge
        Pint

        Re: Nitpick..

        >It came down to the pies. It's my only excuse.

        Okay, however, given it's location it is a toss up between Melton Mowbray pies, Stilton cheese and Rutland beer Grainstore Brewery @ Oakham - the spiritual successor to the Langham Ruddles brewery... :)

  13. diver_dave

    Humm. My lunch hour gone following the truss link.

    Oh er missus

  14. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    My Favourite Viaduct

    I rather like the one on the West Highland line, between Tyndrum and Bridge of Orchy...great shape, almost goes a full circle around the hillsides.

    1. ravenviz
      Thumb Up

      Re: My Favourite Viaduct

      Ah yes, the massive lump that is Beinn Dorain, a spectacular sight before your way across Rannoch Moor.

  15. RichardPH

    Very interesting and impressive.

    I still prefer the Crumlin viaduct. What a beast to have living overhead!

    1. Mike Richards Silver badge

      The Crumlin Viaduct look utterly terrifying - something like the Meccano bridges I built as a kid and then tested to destruction. I just hope its builders were rather better at tightening screws than I was.

      https://www.gettyimages.co.uk/detail/news-photo/train-crossing-the-crumlin-viaduct-in-monmouthshire-news-photo/3163700#/9th-july-1936-a-train-crossing-the-crumlin-viaduct-in-monmouthshire-picture-id3163700

      1. Roland6 Silver badge

        Re: Crumlin Viaduct

        Interesting video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPKsxBaCPTo

        Fan site: http://www.crumlinviaduct.co.uk

        1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

          Re: Crumlin Viaduct

          Interesting video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPKsxBaCPTo

          Shoulda called Fred Dibnah. He'd have had it down in a day!

  16. PhilBuk

    Memories

    Remember this from my childhood. I was born in Cotmanhay, next to Bennerley and both part of Ilkeston really. Used to fish in the Erewash canal which runs under the viaduct (did the author call it the Nottingham canal?) and go trainspotting on the Midland line (which also ran under the bridge). Trains at that time were mostly coal trains pulled by 2-10-0 WD class. There was the occasional Class 9 and some of the smaller classes but most of the traffic was pulled by clanky, hastely assembled wartime stuff.

    Phil.

    1. tfc

      Re: Memories

      I walked past there last Saturday, it looks rather neglected. The Erewash Canal is in the valley, the Nottingham Canal is higher up, where the view is from, the viaduct crossed both.

      If you are in the area I would suggest trying the pubs in Ilkeston, a pint of Guinnes and a John Smiths bitter was £4.50!

      1. PhilBuk

        Re: Memories

        I occasionaly go home to visit my sister who lives over near Gallows Inn. Don't usually go over that side of town unless I visit my nephew on the Cotmanhay estate. Can't sample the ales any more thanks to coeliac disease but the prices in Il's'on are comparable to where I live at the moment, the Wirral.

        You're right about the Nottingham Canal - that was a long way away when I was a lad. Isn't the Nutbrook Canal up there somewhere?

        Phil.

        p.s. Age tends to make memories better but I will always remember Ilkeston as being 'boring' rather than 'bustling'.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Memories

      Trains at that time were mostly coal trains pulled by 2-10-0 WD class.

      And I was thinking I was old. I'm feeling positively youthful now.

      Respect, sir.

      1. MJI Silver badge

        Re: Memories

        Sounds like he was spotting pre my birth.

        My oldest railway memory is what I later found out was a green Warship.

    3. MJI Silver badge

      Re: Memories

      That is old.

      I can only just remember a green Warship, and travelling in BS gangwayed corridor stock, I may have seen a couple of steam engines, but I was only 3 or 4 or so.

  17. Inventor of the Marmite Laser Silver badge

    And for one that is still in use

    How about the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct - Taken a boat over that a couple of times and walked across a few more, for good measure. A truly impressive thing.

  18. StheD

    I read the whole article but one thing I don't get.

    Why a duck?

  19. earl grey Silver badge
    Pint

    Thank you

    Love these articles about things of beauty.

  20. TVU Silver badge

    And the villains of the piece are...

    ...the National Lottery for not funding Sustrans' scheme which would have restored the viaduct and brought it back into public use.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: And the villains of the piece are...

      And the villains of the piece are......the National Lottery for not funding Sustrans' scheme

      Why villains? The stupidity tax only raises a finite amount, and preserving an obscure (if interesting) gem for the benefit of middle class peddle pushers and industrial archaeology buffs has to compete with similar quasi-charitable good causes.

      Personally I'd spend the entire sum of the National Lottery "pot" on addressing drug related crime, knife crime, and urban deprivation, rather than the shit hobby sponsorship that appear to be the core beneficiaries.

  21. Keith 12

    Facinating, informative and particularly well written article - Thank You..

  22. Roland6 Silver badge

    Wooden Rail viaducts

    Given some of the comments have wandered off on to stone, cast iron and other old-fashioned materials, remembering the Barmouth wooden viaduct I thought I would do a little research...

    There are two wooden viaducts still in use!

    1. Barmouth Viaduct

    2. Allt-na-Slanach Viaduct, Moy

  23. gypsythief

    Reminds me of this terrifying beast:

    https://i.imgur.com/MKFArdN.jpg

    The railway itself is disused, so you are free to walk across; however, the sleepers merely span the gap, with _nothing_ between them apart from the fresh air betwixt yourself and the sea below. The walkway to the side, despite being solid, really wasn't much better.

    If anyone fancies testing their mettle against it, you can find it here:

    https://www.google.co.za/maps/place/Kaaimans+River+Railway+Bridge/@-33.9977873,22.554871,17z

    But back on topic, the Geek's Map to Britain has been updated with the Bennerley Viaduct:

    http://www.gypsythief.org.uk/GeeksMapToBritain/

    (only 4 posts to go (after this one) until I can post actual proper hyperlinks. Yay!)

  24. eljanner

    Calstock Viaduct

    Strictly speaking the Calstock viaduct is not stone. It was built from concrete blocks fabricated on the riverbank nearby. I guess that was cheaper than hacking out and transporting Dartmoor granite. An evening trip up the line to Calstock/Gunnislake makes for a great pub crawl.

  25. Bclten23

    This article was hugely informative and clearly lovingly written by an author who cares deeply about this subject.

    Thank you.

  26. james swiers

    we should so sell nelsons column

  27. james swiers

    cant beat those romans

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