back to article Android at 10: How Google won the smartphone wars

It was an anniversary that prompted much reflection. The Platform had completely triumphed and was now ubiquitous, relied on by people all over the world. You could find the Platform in almost every conceivable kind of device, from cars to TVs. Although Apple had once been the pioneer, it now had to settle for life in the …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    The Dystopian Future Today

    "For Windows 2003 to become Android 2017, merely add the obvious: Android is far bigger and far more invasive than a PC could ever be. Google's dominance over our personal lives is far greater than Microsoft's ever was. The clunky laptop in the corner did not track your every movement or read your emails. It didn't try to be "smart" – or at least if it did, the derision ensured it did not try for long."

    .....Makes for depressing reading... Puzzled how you sound so cheery?

    "staying on top might prove much harder for Google... explore in part two."

    .....Please tell us the 'data-monster' dies by choking on its own vomit?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      'tell us the 'data-monster' dies'

      It'd be great to imagine Fake-News killing off Google & Facebook. But that only happens in novels. Fake-clicks didn't kill them. Slurp revelations didn't even wound them. What will it take?

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: 'tell us the 'data-monster' dies'

        It'd be great to imagine Fake-News killing off Google & Facebook.....What will it take?

        "It's just that Google was in the game, at a time when others didn't realise what the game was."

        I'm a long- experienced business strategist by trade and in this quote Mr Orlowski nails EXACTLY how companies win in formative and evolving markets, not just tech, any evolving market. Not by being clever, just by being quick, organised and willing to take well judged commercial risks. But this is also how Google & FB will eventually lose, just as Microsoft lost the phone war, the tablet war, and many other wars.

        Dominant players get complacent, nothing new ever matches up to the scale and glory of their core business, it never gets the resources, energy, effort. And, in a dominant business, even for new products nobody ever has the hunger of the new kids, who live or die by their efforts. New ventures need multiple approvals from middle and senior managers who are incumbents, and see no value in attaching their name to possible failure. Look at how the old Motorola (pre-Google) struggled and failed to innovate, and the original V3 had to be developed in secret to stop it being crushed by the bureaucracy. Nowadays, these big companies promote ideas like "fail fast" and internal incubators - yet those all fail because they're still part of that dominant player, who no longer needs to, or can, innovate. Google trial lots of new things, yet look how they failed so spectacularly in social media, precisely because they didn't realise what the game was until it was over.

        Sometimes companies win, and then lose, because surviving and growing is a different to winning the market in the first place. Friends Reunited, for example, or perhaps even AOL. Look at how Tesla have won the premium EV market, whilst the motor industry sat on its arse, most not knowing what the game was, or thinking that it hadn't yet started. In that case, although Tesla have already won, there's further separate battles that I think they will lose - that they won't scale the business successfully, or be able to capitalise and build on their current winning position. But Tesla will probably live on in name, and will be fondly remembered as the company who defined the EV as a desirable, attractive car with great performance, decent range, and widespread charging support.

        Almost by definition, big companies lose because, like an elderly jaywalker, they simply don't see the fast car that wipes them out. So it will be with Google, Facebook. They won't go quickly or quietly, but they won't have anywhere to go as something most people won't see until it's done makes their core platform a lower value, low growth operation.

        1. Khaptain Silver badge

          Re: 'tell us the 'data-monster' dies'

          "Almost by definition, big companies lose "

          What's really worrying here though is what they will be replaced by, in general they will be overtaken by someone even more evil....

        2. fuzzie

          Re: 'tell us the 'data-monster' dies'

          What would make their demise interesting would be how people will get years of stuff they've uploaded back out of the platforms, or maybe, like MySpace and Orkut, they'll just hang around like dusty old attics.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: 'tell us the 'data-monster' dies'

            What would make their demise interesting would be how people will get years of stuff they've uploaded back out of the platforms, or maybe, like MySpace and Orkut, they'll just hang around like dusty old attics.

            Well, in a catastrophic event, like a bankruptcy, the bills don't get paid, the servers get turned off, and then all the assets get sold. Chances of seeing your data again from those servers = nil. But that's unlikely, and I'd guess that these giants will fade away, there would be plenty of chance to get your data out, and advanced warning of a controlled cessation of services. Ignore the warnings, though, and your data goes.

            A related question, is what happens to your cloudy data if another corporation buys the fading business and therefore has access to all the unencrypted data within it. Ignoring any theoretical rights, what PRACTICAL rights will users have regarding their data and privacy? The data is probably already held outside the EU, the original agreements with the service provider may or may not carry over, there may be no opportunity for redress through any fair legal system or arbitration route. The buyer could well be

            intending to ream out every cent of value by abusing the data for all it is worth. Potentially, the buyer could be a non-investor owned corporation with very low transparency, possibly allied to (eg) the Chinese government, and their behaviour might make people think Google had behaved like a saint....

        3. jacksmith21006

          Re: 'tell us the 'data-monster' dies'

          Do not agree. The future is AI and Google is well ahead of the others where the puck is going. MS keeps skating where the puck was already at.

          1. Loud Speaker

            Re: 'tell us the 'data-monster' dies'

            The future is AI<P>

            The future was AI in 1947, and still will be in 2047.<p>

            To paraphrase the Goons: "Artificial Intelligence? We need the real thing!"

        4. a_yank_lurker Silver badge

          Re: 'tell us the 'data-monster' dies'

          @AC - About big companies - Successful big companies have a leadership that plays to win. They understand their strengths and weaknesses. What happens in many is the leadership plays not to lose.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: 'tell us the 'data-monster' dies'

            Successful big companies have a leadership that plays to win. They understand their strengths and weaknesses.

            As the relevant AC, I'd like to say that I've got a lot of experience of different companies, and in almost all companies, when they stop to think about it, they do have a good idea of what they are good and bad at. But the incumbent mindset is unable to adjust to the analysis they undertake. Take UK energy suppliers - awful customer service, slow to react, pathologically process focused, competition-fearing, low innovation, risk averse. I've worked with the directors of one of these companies, they know all this, but they simply have a mental block about the fairly radical steps needed to overcome them. There's change initiative after change initiative - but nothing really changes. There's board away days with world famous gurus, every £1,000 a day consultant they can find, but they can't see that they are the problem, and that their behaviour is the shadow that all the middle and senior managers emulate.

            One other thought, in the longer view perspective, there's very, very few companies that survive and are continuously successful. Many are successful for a few years, or even decades, but what do you now hear of the East India Company, for example? They were so successful that at one point they ruled a quarter of the world. Even within the past hundred years, this pattern is repeated. A tiny number of businesses prolong this period by reinventing their business model, but that's in effect becoming a portfolio investor rather than running a company - GE are a good example of that.

            So, understanding SWOT is easy, but getting the directors of a successful company to back change is very, very difficult. How obvious was it to us that Uber was in trouble and needed radical top down change? Yet Travis the man couldn't see the need, or more likely he couldn't see how. Google et al don't see that tax dodging, and obsessive lobbying already are liabilities - by the time they do, they won't know how to stop. In the longer term, I don't believe there are any successful companies - they come they go, some thrive, then fade. None live forever, but unlike animals they can't live on through reproduction. And M&A merely moves corporate assets around, it doesn't enable the corporations to live on.

            1. a_yank_lurker Silver badge

              Re: 'tell us the 'data-monster' dies'

              @AC - I do not think we really disagree overall. The problem of a company is that it is hard to continuously find aggressive leaders who will play to win. Somewhere around the third or fourth CEO companies often pick] an excessively cautious CEO whose mindset is not to win but not to lose. If the board does not quickly realize this the excessive caution gets ingrained in the organization and they develop a pathological aversion to risk over time. The aversion to risk allows a competitor to grab profitable markets before the lumbering dinosaur is even aware of them.

              An example is Slurp. Gates was a driven leader who made Slurp a dominant software slinger. Ballmer tried to continue this in his tenure; the Nokia purchase is sign he was willing to take big risks. Nadella seems to be trying 'safe' bets such as SaaS and the cloud. He failed to understand Ballmer's Nokia purchase as an attempt to secure a future for Slurp on mobile devices. Nadella's strategy seems to be a 'me too' vendor in SaaS and cloud. The problem is for both is that SaaS and cloud are largely DOA in consumer space; very few consumers are thrilled at constantly paying subscriptions for something they use irregularly. So Slurp is now competing more directly with entrenched vendors in both who will fiercely fight any Slurp incursion. They are also largely fighting over the same customer base. Other than Office, Slurp's SaaS and cloud options are not sufficiently different to warrant being the automatic first choice vendor.

            2. Nonymous Crowd Nerd

              Re: 'they come, they go... '

              "... they come they go, some thrive, then fade. None live forever..."

              Really excellent points here. But we should not be complacent. I think there is something to be concerned about. Yes, the East India Company was huge - so were Standard Oil and Bell Telephones - and yes, all these declined. But they weren't truly multinational ("globalised") in the way that Google and Facebook et al are today. The US was able act to split Bell into baby Bells. But the same trick in today's circumstances is starting to look unlikely.

              While the issues of undue political influence and the erosion of the corporate tax base are widely acknowledged, western powers are looking disturbingly impotent, constantly divided and distracted and beset by lobbying. Nothing is being done to counter the threat. Nothing really viable seems even to be in the pipeline. Very soon it might be to late. Perhaps it already is.

        5. G R Goslin

          Re: 'tell us the 'data-monster' dies'

          It rather reminds me of the National Cash Register (NCR) company, who sat complacently on their mechanical design and manufacture, as the digital age steamrollered them flat.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: 'tell us the 'data-monster' dies'

            It rather reminds me of the National Cash Register (NCR) company, who sat complacently on their mechanical design and manufacture, as the digital age steamrollered them flat.

            I believe NCR were doing a more than adequate job on the move to digital, up until AT&T bought them and crushed them to death? They were one of the five last mainframe makers, they had a successful line in EPOS, they were the leader in ATMs. I suppose it may have been the same outcome if AT&T hadn't bought them, but we'll never know that.

        6. John Smith 19 Gold badge
          Gimp

          " just about good enough, and its parent was prepared to cross subsidise it hugely."

          That's exactly how Windows was developed and how Microsoft won on the desktop.

          Expect the same "We are not a monopoly, other options exist" BS from Google ad infinitum.

          And yes, all your data belong to us.

          "Do no evil." Who are they f**king kidding.

        7. Jim Birch

          Re: 'tell us the 'data-monster' dies'

          There are plenty of incumbents who have been around for many decades and haven't blown it and are making plenty of money. The collapse of incumbents is a juicy narrative, not a universal truth. It depends. Nothing lasts forever but there are many things around us that have apparently lasted for a lasted for a long time.

      2. Bunty

        Re: Where is the anti virus to kill the Google virus? Bring it on!!

        Google must die! Google deleted all of my photos on Picasa when I left YouTube. Recently it deleted all of my contacts and phone numbers on my mobile and much more! Grrrrrr!. As I see it, Google is in the top category of virus, it removes or alters programs on your computer! It installs it's own programs on your computer or phone and makes changes. Under another name there would be anti virus programs to get rid of it - bring them on!

  2. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Horsecrap

    "and every word above that describes Windows in 2003 also applies to Android today."

    Android isn't insecure, it's very secure. This doesn't fit very well with the clickbaiters and anti-virus industry desperate to cash in, but it's the truth.

    Android gets monthly patches, delivered in a timely manner to 1st party devices, (if you were stupid enough to buy 2nd party, or even 3rd paty device, that is not Google, nor Android's fault).

    Android has had proper application sandboxing from the outset, it's had a very good permissions based system, it's had a application store locked down by default. Windows had NONE of these things.

    With more active Android devices that Windows, you would thin malware would be widespread, however pretty much every story in the media is purely hypothetical, here in the real world, nobody ever sees real world problems.

    Whilst Windows has been the malware cesspool since the beginning of the Internet, and continues to be, even in Windows 10, whilst Android security problems are pretty much non existent..

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      "BankBot Android malware sneaks into the Google Play Store - for the third time"

      Just the latest news...

      http://www.zdnet.com/article/bankbot-android-malware-sneaks-into-the-google-play-store-for-the-third-time/

      Smartphone malware is designed in different ways than desktop one.... take away your pink Google glasses, in the real world people run into troubles with Android.

      But of course they are "fake news", aren't they?

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: "BankBot Android malware sneaks into the Google Play Store - for the third time"

        But of course they are "fake news", aren't they?

        The OP was extreme in their position, but surely still has a valid point that the prevalence of actively exploited security problems on the Android platform does seem to be far behind the endless problems associated with Windows?

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          "endless problems associated with Windows?endless problems associated with Windows?"

          Are you comparing oranges with apples? A desktop operating system has inevitably a far larger attack surface than a mobile OS, for the very reason it is much more versatile. Very few will accept the limitations mobe apps have on a desktop.

          Desktops don't get replaced every two years like a mobe, and many of them run more critical software than any mobe.

          There are also good chances your find more valuable data on a desktop (or server), and they are more useful as members of a botnet.

          Windows adds to that a legacy of old protocols and applications which is really time to kill once for ever, but there are also too many systems that may be crippled by that. iOS could kill all 32 bit applications at once, Windows can't do that.

          What do you prefer? Your local hospital crippled by a malware, or by a Windows update that causes any old application to stop working?

          And would you really like a Windows where you can't install applications but from its Store, which is something MS is trying to achieve? Or applications sandboxed in ways that make exchanging files and data a nightmare?

          1. jacksmith21006

            Re: "endless problems associated with Windows?endless problems associated with Windows?"

            How does a desktop OS have a larger attack surface? It is the exact opposite in every dimension. There is far more mobile software. Mobile OSs are doing far more things than desktop. Mobile phones are mobile so they are exposed to far more physical areas. There is a lot more mobile phones. Mobile phones are changing a lot faster than desktop. Mobile phones interface with a lot more things than desktop.

            1. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              "How does a desktop OS have a larger attack surface?"

              1) It does support many more network protocols than a mobe, and related services/deamons

              2) It has far more and more complex APIs

              3) It runs a broader variety of and far more complex applications (just loot at how an Apache Struts vuln can create havoc...)

              4) Applications can interact in many more ways

              5) Unlike most mobes they can receive network connections initiated from other machines (and usually mobes are behind the mobile company NAT system, which shields them from direct attacks)

              6) User perform more complex operations, involving more complex documents and data (which may be used as attack vectors)

              7) As already said, they need to support a lot of old, legacy applications.

              8) Unlike a mobe, there are far more concurrent services and applications running

              9) The amount of RAM, CPU cycles, and disk space makes far easier to hide malicious code.

              10) It does support a far broader range of devices, and thereby needs their drivers

              If you believe your mobe OS is alile a desktop OS, ask youself why Google don't run everything on Android...

              1. bombastic bob Silver badge
                Linux

                Re: "How does a desktop OS have a larger attack surface?"

                a) if it's windows, it listens on a bunch of predictable ports, on EVERY IP ADDRESS (including IPv6)

                b) if it's windows, it always listens on port 139 and 445, whether or not network sharing is enabled [last I checked, anyway]

                c) if it's windows, there are a number of "magic services" running that always listen for traffic on the same ports, so that an UNFIREWALLED system is potentially vulnerable to a number of potential cracks

                If it's NOT windows, none of this applies, unless it was configured by an _IDIOT_.

          2. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: "endless problems associated with Windows?endless problems associated with Windows?"

            Hmm, Les get it on ACDC is playing in the back ground.

            Windows a bigger attack area than Android. Attack area depends a lot on area open to attack. Android has been like a siv and even the play protect thing hasn't proven too effective.

            If you are following proper procedure than your desktop machine should be off unwakable stone dead when not using it. The network should be physically disconnected when not using it. You should maintain separate non connected work machines with no wired or wireless connectivity (including microphones and any speaker or ir or remote device access), and figure a way to copy files to limited sized media to move data accross, to do updates (yes, not so easy).

            Now, your mobile, has access to a wealth of health biometrics, business communications, personal communications for anybody to make a case against you (bad, but in certain countries desdly). Your cloud data, and your computer's cloud data are all accessible through the mobile vector. Bank and card details. Identity theft details, you can be up fur 18 months of nightmare trying to prove you are who you are and correcting the issue (has happened here) while your accounts have been drained. Yes Mobile is an Achilles heal. Some people commit suicide over the sorts of things that they may store on their phone, even murdur. Now these data and communications are becoming more prevalent and visible because of mobiles, can you imagine if hacks flooded the internet with them?

            Mobile is a major OS just like desktop OD, and we shouldn't expect less security from them just because it fits in your pocket allwsys connected (even if data seems off) where it is more vulnerable to interception and loss. Can you imagine if outside countries figure out they can compromise people, and produce political/instability from the data of normal people, through blackmail, and desirable interactions, along with criminal enterprises. Already they have been experimenting on the larger level, but what they need is compromised assets on the ground. So, pretending to be criminals, they can black mail people into dubious acts, that eventually look criminal, but really are sabotage. Welcome to the slack IT and mobile future the industry has bought us (yes bought as well as brought). Thanks.

        2. DougS Silver badge

          @Ledswinger - prevalence of actively exploited ... on Android v Windows

          People - including/especially bad guys - go where the money is. At first malware was just to mess with people, the only thing the author got out of it was notoriety. Malware 2.0 came when building armies of bots for spamming became something you could make money with, so malware become monetized. As botnet armies are becoming less profitable for spamming we're starting malware 3.0 now - monetizing via ransomware.

          Phones were never useful for spam botnets, so they were irrelevant to malware 2.0. Having a backup of your phone is (ironically) a lot easier for people than a backup of your PC, so malware 3.0 isn't likely to be a factor on phones either.

          There are plenty of exploits found every month on phones, but in order to develop specific mass attacks, there has to be some monetary reward waiting. Otherwise the bad guys are going to continue putting their efforts towards PCs instead of phones, since they know there's a payoff waiting on PCs but not really on phones.

          The reason people are willing to pay big bucks on the black market for a 0 day on Android (and even bigger bucks on iOS) is not because they want to use it to hack a million phones. They want to use it to hack a few specifically targeted phones. If they can attack the phone and turn it into a tracker or maybe even a listening device, they can make a lot of money with the right target. Let's say they could listen in on some sensitive meeting - they could find out about a merger before it happens and make millions in the stock market. But what would be the point of listening to a million phones, what could you do with that? Nothing, because it would take forever to find the one or two conversations that you could monetize.

          1. Rainer

            Re: @Ledswinger - prevalence of actively exploited ... on Android v Windows

            > But what would be the point of listening to a million phones, what could you do with that?

            > Nothing, because it would take forever to find the one or two conversations that you could monetize.

            I think, the changing AI-landscape might force you to re-evaluate that position.

            Just because you and I can't come up with a way to profit from that in five minutes doesn't mean somebody else (with more criminal energy) can't come up with one next month either.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: "BankBot Android malware sneaks into the Google Play Store - for the third time"

        They don't actually take about how many people actually got affected by this, or what permissions the app asked for.

        I know the answer, sod all real end users, a handful of security "experts" and the permissions are extreme to say the least, including needing to grant access to text messages and draw overlays on the screen.

        You would have to be a total cretin, or a security "researcher",(essentially the same thing) to fall for this.

        How many numpties stupid enough to fall for this even know what a crypto currency is????

        Quite clearly if you believe this story, then you too are buying i to the mountains of horseshit news that ZDNet and the others are desperate to push in an era of trying to generate revenue from anywhere.....

        Is it fake news, yes of course, there are small elements of the story that are true to attempt to add some credibility, but sod all in the way of any factual data to back up the claims

    2. MyffyW Silver badge

      Re: Horsecrap

      Forgive my ignorance - does "1st party" here refer to the rather small number of android handsets from Google themselves?

      If so does that make Samsung a 2nd party, or a 3rd?

      Genuinely curious...

      1. Spanners Silver badge
        Pirate

        Re: Horsecrap - MyffyW

        Bought from Google - 1st party

        Bought direct from Phone manufacturer or Carphone Warehouse etc unlocked - 2nd party

        Bought subsidised from phone company - 3rd party

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Horsecrap - MyffyW

          Sorta

          1st party = Nexus or Google Pixel

          2nd party = Samsung, LG, Huawei, etc devices on an OTA upgrade path from the OEM

          3rd party = a customised version of 2 sold to you by a carrier, with special uninstallable carrier apps skins bootup logos etc.

          The patches trickle down from 1 (Google) to 2 (OEMs) to 3 (Carriers), with a large drop-off rate along the way.

          1. jelabarre59 Silver badge

            Re: Horsecrap - MyffyW

            1st party = Nexus or Google Pixel

            2nd party = Samsung, LG, Huawei, etc devices on an OTA upgrade path from the OEM

            3rd party = a customised version of 2 sold to you by a carrier, with special uninstallable carrier apps skins bootup logos etc.

            Sorry, but I'd place the Google/Nexus devices in "2nd party" as well, considering their inability to keep up on updates as well.

            The only thing that would qualify as "1st party" would be anything that can be readily flashed with the latest LineageOS build. If you can't fully control the device, you don't really "own" it, regardless of how much you paid for it.

        2. dajames Silver badge

          Re: Horsecrap - MyffyW

          Bought from Google - 1st party

          Bought direct from Phone manufacturer or Carphone Warehouse etc unlocked - 2nd party

          Bought subsidised from phone company - 3rd party

          No, I think you're missing the point.

          Google-branded phone with unmodified Google Android - 1st party.

          OEM-branded phone with the OEM's own customization and skinning - 2nd party.

          OEM-branded phone bought subsidized from airtime provider with customization by OEM and by airco - 3rd party.

          What's relevant is the number of customizations that would have to be re-applied to an Android update in order to upgrade the device. The closer to Google your device was sourced the more likely it is to see an upgrade.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Horsecrap

        Yep, of course. If you buy a network agnostic Samsung you are 2nd party and rely on how long it takes Samsung to pull their finger out, if you buy a network locked Samsung phone you are a 3rd party customer at the mercy of your network too.

        Its not rocket science,but clearly too many cretins can't work it out, and want to pay 3rd party prices for a flashy phone at rock bottom monthly rates powered by network subsidies, and expect 1st party support that you get only from Apple or Google.

        1. Loud Speaker

          Re: Horsecrap

          But any reasonable European would expect that, on pain of prison sentence for the company directors, the device would receive security upgrades as long as it remains operational - or at least 7 years - because the malware is a threat to others, not just the owner, and the owner is most certainly not a security expert.

          However, the EU has dropped the ball on this one. We need to leave the EU, so Boris can go after the Phone manufacturers for us (with a soft pillow)!

    3. RyokuMas Silver badge
      Boffin

      Re: Horsecrap

      "Android security problems are pretty much non existent.."

      In 2003, the vast majority of applications installed (legitimately) on a Windows PC were still installed from physical media. The "internet" was still a relatively new territory, and Microsoft - in their usual style - were completely wrong-footed when it came to the challenges that this might bring, namely the ability to piggy-back viruses and other nasties onto the back of emails, attachments etc that could then propagate themselves across networks and via email by plundering address books.

      Fast-forward to 2017, and the benefit of over a decade of experience. Android was built with a connected world in mind, and as a result is fundamentally more secure to the attack vectors that plagued early 2000s Windows PCs. However, if you want to install any software on Android, your options are either to get it from the Play store, or turn on sideloading capabilities and download it from another source. This latter option is considered risky, to the point where the argument has been posed to remove the ability. And the former option? Well,

      I'll just leave this here...

      In short, the attack targets have moved on in accordance with direction technology has taken, based on profit and easy of access - and considering that it costs a mere $25 to submit as many apps as you want to the store of the highest-market-share mobile OS, coupled with said store's front-line policing being purely algorithmic, it is not surprising that, to quote, "It's 2017 and you can still pwn Android gear with [insert attack vector here]".

      Security is, and always will be, a consistent predator-prey type chase - and anyone who claims that a system's security problems "are pretty much non existent" is either using something that is completely disconnected from everything, or has drunk the cool-aid of their vendor of choice.

      1. jelabarre59 Silver badge

        Re: Horsecrap

        However, if you want to install any software on Android, your options are either to get it from the Play store, or turn on sideloading capabilities and download it from another source. This latter option is considered risky, to the point where the argument has been posed to remove the ability.

        Seems to me the insistence on locking out the very people who *bought and paid for* their devices is wrongheaded in so many ways. You need a security patch the vendor hasn't provided? Tough luck sucker, cough up money for a new one and toss your old one in the toxic landfill. You want to secure your device further than the vendor's (or even Google's) failed attempts at it (such as parental controls for a child's device)? Too bad, you are forbidden the very root access you would need in order to do a proper low-level configuration.

        Heck, even on your most cluttered crapware-infested and insecure MSWin preload, you could at least wipe the system and do a clean, stripped-down install of an OS (excluding those abominations with locked-out "secure boot"). Android forbids that *by design*. Properly done, an Android system would have it's OS on a removable flash-storage that could be pulled, reformatted or replaced (much as you could pull and replace a HDD in a PC now). But we aren't "customers" to the Android vendors; we're just sheep to be fleeced.

    4. MacroRodent Silver badge
      Windows

      Re: Horsecrap

      A better comparison would be Windows Phone, which was kept well updated, and as far as I know did not suffer from malware. WP 8.1 was possibly the best OS Microsoft ever made. Too bad Microsoft broke everything that was good about it in the phone version of Windows 10: after having now used it for a couple of months, I can say they lost the phone wars deservedly...

    5. Dan 55 Silver badge
      FAIL

      Re: Horsecrap

      Android isn't insecure, it's very secure. This doesn't fit very well with the clickbaiters and anti-virus industry desperate to cash in, but it's the truth.

      Android gets monthly patches, delivered in a timely manner to 1st party devices, (if you were stupid enough to buy 2nd party, or even 3rd paty device, that is not Google, nor Android's fault).

      If Windows could only be updated on Surface, and OEMs took their own sweet time before sending out their own versions of those updates, and those OEM machines sold by shops who offered computers on credit held things up too by having to update their own bloatware as well before giving the go-ahead, nobody would be dare be silly enough to call Windows a secure OS. But that's what you're doing here.

      1. Joe Montana

        Re: Horsecrap

        The OEMs (and network operators) and their customisations are the problem, and the same thing does happen with windows but to a much smaller extent... Various vendors (eg of ATMs or POS systems) provide preinstalled versions of windows which you aren't supposed to update using the standard updates, if you do so the device becomes unsupported by the vendor and it may well break their custom software.

        I had similar problems with symbian phones, where operators would provide their own hacked versions with features broken or disabled etc, and often very unstable... Usually you could wipe them and install the stock nokia firmware which i'd done on several occasions.

        1. DougS Silver badge

          Re: Horsecrap

          All those security holes Google issues patches for every month are for Android, not for OEM or network operator customizations so you can hardly pin the blame on them. Whatever security holes they create may be unknown to the user since there would be fewer people looking for them versus generic Android bugs that would apply to all phones. If/when OEM customization bugs are fixed the OEM may never tell you that "fix for Touchwiz security hole X" was included in the Android patch that was installed. Which Android OEMs publish CVEs for their own layers (i.e. Touchwiz or whatever) or bundled apps? I'd be surprised to discover many do, they'd rather hide the problem.

          I don't think the OEMs have much incentive to look for bugs themselves in the way Google and Apple do, because they don't want end users to know that they may be adding insecurities on top of the ones Google is giving them. If OEMs don't list their fixes - or worse don't bother to even do fixes unless an outsider finds a bug and makes it / threatens to make it public - they can preserve an illusion that OEM or network operator customizations don't add any holes...

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Horsecrap

            You known also have monthly patches too, but the luxury of closed source means they can silently fix them and. It have to declare them publicly. Because android is opensource, it's all in the open for everyone to see, no hidden behind closed doors shenanigans. This is handy monthly clickbait for el-reg and others, so everyone is happy.

            1. Dan 55 Silver badge

              Re: Horsecrap

              Play Services is not open source and is where the bulk of new Android* features are added.

              * Well, closed-source Google Android features.

          2. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Horsecrap

            "All those security holes Google issues patches for every month are for Android"

            Semi-true: For the latest version of Android.

            If and when you are using the previous version, you don't get anything, ever. That means that anything older than an year or two isn't updated at all.

            That's even worse job than MS is doing, by far.

    6. Cosmo

      Re: Horsecrap

      "Android gets monthly patches, delivered in a timely manner to 1st party devices, (if you were stupid enough to buy 2nd party, or even 3rd paty device, that is not Google, nor Android's fault)."

      I have a Nexus 4 phone and a Nexus 7 tablet kicking around at home somewhere. They are both 1st party devices. Where are their monthly patches?

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Horsecrap

        LineageOS. Both those devices are now over 5 years old. Thank yourself lucky you didn't buy apple, they would have dumped you well before the 5 year mark, and an dumped apple device doesn't get ANY system updates.

        Your 5year old nexus devices however will have been updated to run the latest web browser and WebKit library for other apps to use) the latest email and gmail apps, and every other store updatable system app too, google would have squirted down the latest SSL libraries via Google play services too and would have sent you play protect (on device scanning for malicious apps).

        So yes, you got a hell of a lot more than a apple user would above got, your updates were delivered seamlessly without you noticing or needing a full OS update to get them.

        Are you missing out on kernel fixes, yes, but it's unreasonable to expect them on a device that cost less than £250 5 years ago.

        1. Cosmo

          Re: Horsecrap

          Are you missing out on kernel fixes, yes, but it's unreasonable to expect them on a device that cost less than £250 5 years ago.

          And this is exactly the problem. If I had bought a less than £250 Windows PC 5 years ago, I would still be getting kernel updates.

          1. naive

            Re: Horsecrap

            > And this is exactly the problem. If I had bought a less than £250 Windows PC 5 years ago, I would still be getting kernel updates.

            That is not a virtue of Windows, but a result from the differing supply models. MS sells the OS, dictates hardware specification to the OEM, and sends updates.

            Google makes Android available for free, instead of the $ 100,- MS charges, the OEM adapts it to match its hardware, and therefore becomes responsible for updates.

            Given the amount of freedom and flexibility, Android doesn't do badly, even the North-Korea inspired supply model of Apple has had its security issues.

      2. fishman

        Re: Horsecrap

        "I have a Nexus 4 phone and a Nexus 7 tablet kicking around at home somewhere. They are both 1st party devices. Where are their monthly patches?"

        While Apple does a much better job than Google on updates/patches, old iphones can be unsupported - try putting IOS11 on a Iphone 5.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Horsecrap

          I think google does a much better job than Apple personally. On 1st party devices, Google support in on par with apple, but android has a much better architecture for delivering updates. Apple need OS flash to fix a keyboard bug, Google deliver the system app via the play store, no OS update needed.

          1. werdsmith Silver badge

            Re: Horsecrap

            Apple need OS flash to fix a keyboard bug,

            Yes, but there were many lies being told around the web about the fix for the keyboard "i" problem being a 1GB full OS download. In fact the 11.1.1 update is already out and is only 44.6MB including a separate SIRI fix.

            Yes, it does include a rstart, no big deal in itself and when I used an Android a reboot was usually a pretty good idea more often than not anyway.

          2. Dan 55 Silver badge

            Re: Horsecrap

            I think google does a much better job than Apple personally. On 1st party devices, Google support in on par with apple, but android has a much better architecture for delivering updates. Apple need OS flash to fix a keyboard bug, Google deliver the system app via the play store, no OS update needed.

            Earlier Nexus devices have stopped receiving updates whereas Apple still support devices of a similar age.

            Google putting their keyboard on the App Store is only to try and get people with 2nd party phones to install their slurpboard. That obviously makes no sense with iPhones.

            And as Google refuse to make AOSP Keyboard available on the Play Store, Simple Keyboard will have to do.

        2. Ian Reissmann

          Re: Horsecrap

          In what sense in an iphone 5 unsupported?

          iOS10 receives updates. The fact that you can't install iOS11 is irrelevant. Feature updates are quite different from security updates and maintenance updates.

    7. FIA

      Re: Horsecrap

      Android gets monthly patches, delivered in a timely manner to 1st party devices,

      Android has recently started receiving monthly patches, as previously the state of Android fixes even for hardware from Google was woeful. I believe you're guaranteed these for up to 2 years?

      (if you were stupid enough to buy 2nd party, or even 3rd paty device,

      Android powers consumer devices, to expect consumers to all be fully versed in the intricacies of IT security is naive; and also does little to actually address the issue. People quite rightly expect to buy things that 'work'.

      If your ADSL router ends up as part of a botnet is it because you're stupid for not buying XYZ? As it's consumer hardware shouldn't you have a reasonable expectancy of it being fit for purpose?

      To decry unknowledgeable people as stupid doesn't really help the issue, the vast majority of Android devices aren't 'first party' and don't receive timely security patches. This is getting better, but is still not great.

      that is not Google, nor Android's fault).

      Who's fault is it if not Googles? Android is (primarily) a data capture platform for their advertising business, it's users are not the main customers. Security only became an issue to Google when it stood a chance of impacting their bottom line.

      I'm not saying this is a bad thing, they're an ad broker after all and most companies don't spend on things like security until there's a demonstrable ROI.

      However it does mean that easily updatable and patchable weren't primary design consideration in the early days, and the subsequent efforts are taking time to be broadly accepted. (For example, Android is based upon the Linux kernel, and for various reasons Linux doesn't have a well defined and version stable binary interface to it's driver layer; which means any new kernel version require more effort on the part of OEMs for driver validation. This acts as a disincentive to OEMs to update often as it increases cost, often on devices that have already been sold).

      here in the real world, nobody ever sees real world problems.

      What do you base that on if you don't believe the media? Do you just mean 'I don't know anyone?' (in which case your sample size isn't really representative), or have you actually carried out or are aware of some decent research into the matter?

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Horsecrap

        I stopped reading at "Android has recently started receiving monthly patches,"

        Android has been delivering monthly security updates for over 5 years... I can't be bothered to read the rest, it's also clearly also made up, or read from some corner of the internet that fits with what you want to believe is true.

    8. Teiwaz Silver badge

      Re: Horsecrap

      Android gets monthly patches, delivered in a timely manner to 1st party devices, (if you were stupid enough to buy 2nd party, or even 3rd paty device, that is not Google, nor Android's fault).

      Sheesh, do Google employees have nothing better to do....?

    9. Captain DaFt

      Re: Horsecrap

      Android isn't insecure, it's very secure.

      Designed by an advertising company with hooks to every aspect of the device it's on, with the sole aim of gathering and sending data to them.

      Then they offer the data gathering APIs to all third party programmers to use as they will.

      Then there's the poorly vetted app store, the fact that even the devices they themselves make get poor security support after a very short time, or the fact that lots of third party manufacturers are loath to move to newer, safer versions because Alphabet keeps upping the onus on them with each new version...

      <sarc>Well, you can't get much more secure than that, can you?</sarc>

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Sometimes marketing matters...

    IMHO Palm made a big mistake to rename PalmOS to webOS (yes, the latter was a newer OS with little resemblance to the former). Many user didn't understand it - and thought "webOS" needed to be continually connected to work (something alike what ChromeOS would have been later), in a time when mobile internet was still expensive. It also wasn't compatible with the large catalog of PalmOS apps available. Also releasing both Windows and webOS models didn't make user sure where the future was (in neither, we now know).

    Anyway Android could watch Apple and copy, having little legacy, and Google could afford to give development tools away for free, especially since they were already free stuff Google reused at its own advantage.

    When MS rebooted Windows Mobile, it was already too late.

    1. werdsmith Silver badge

      Re: Sometimes marketing matters...

      ChromeOS doesn't need to be "continually connected to work".

      But alas, WebOS is now an LG TV OS, but could have provided a plausible alternative to iOS.

      I really wish there was one.

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    I am not at all sure Android is more "slurpy"

    although in Windows some of the slurpiness is easier to turn off- and that's only because not many corporate apps run on Android desktops....

    1. RyokuMas Silver badge
      Coat

      Re: I am not at all sure Android is more "slurpy"

      Microsoft are playing catch-up on the slurping game, so I think it's a pretty safe bet.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: I am not at all sure Android is more "slurpy"

      Android slurp is a opt-in. When you setup a device, just don't agree to Google play terms and conditions, select cancel and use your device without any tracking or slurp. Just don't expect to be able to use any Google services. That is the deal, and it's pretty fair.

      Microsoft slurp is a tricky opt out procedure, one that seems to keep resetting itself back to opt you back in..

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Just don't expect to be able to use any Google services.

        Like the keyboard? When I set up my android phone it didn't mention that they keyboard was communicating with Google all the time. It took a couple of keyboard crashes for me to poke around in the settings and find the "Send to google" option.

        You posts are largely bollocks AC, if you want to post where people buy your BS you need to find a forum where people don't understand what you're talking about. Jog on.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Just don't expect to be able to use any Google services.

          Sorry, you are a liar.

          Android has two keyboards, stock android, nothing is send to Google, and Google keyboard (aka gboard), the later is only available from Google play, which you only get by agreeing to Google t&c.

          Gboard doesn't send all your keystrokes to Google either. "Send to Google" It has custom dictionary sync between android devices, and it's optional, but there is no setting that you describe..

          Jog on liar

          Its really easy to packet sniff a device that is not part of Google play, and it's clear to see what's is and what is not being send. I did this for a thesis paper on Android 7.1 and it was clean. Only when opting into Google play services did anything get sent to Google, and only the things Google claimed it was sending as part of Google play T&Cs

          https://play.google.com/intl/en-us_us/about/play-terms.html

  5. Chronos Silver badge
    Flame

    XDA

    Everyone forgets this device. It was the first slab+colour touch screen with rounded edges that preceded the iShiny by years. If anyone has a claim to the format, it's O2. Palms either had keyboards or Grafiti™ input areas, Nok's Symbian was still a clunky menu-driven affair and Apple were still churning out clicky iPods.

    Although it ran CE, the XDA was still an impressive beast for its time. With a decent OS, it could have spawned a revolution with itself as a major player. Instead, it rested on its laurels, kept the mediocre Redmondware and allowed Apple to pinch the format, as is their wont, apply polo-necked street cred to it and market it aggressively. Like Psion, whose 5MX has yet to be bettered in certain niche tasks, a very solid foundation was left unbuilt upon.

    1. iron Silver badge

      Re: XDA

      Palm had colour touchscreen devices for years before the XDA was a thing. Handspring even made versions that were phones as well as PDAs. None of my Palms ever had a keyboard.

      1. DougS Silver badge

        Re: XDA

        And you know who had non-color touchscreens using a stylus before any of them? Apple, with the Newton. If you want to play the "who got there first" game with such a wide net Apple still did, unless you want to include scifi and use Star Trek's pads or probably something from the silent film era.

        Apple made the first smartphone that ordinary people wanted to own. Sure they existed before that, in various forms which included in some cases ones not that different from today's phones. But they were for geeks and PHBs, a regular consumer wouldn't buy them anymore than they'd buy a Raspberry PI today.

        1. conscience
          Gimp

          Re: XDA

          "And you know who had non-color touchscreens using a stylus before any of them? Apple, with the Newton. If you want to play the "who got there first" game with such a wide net Apple still did..."

          Neither the iStuff nor the Newton did anything that was new or first.

          Apple weren't the first to use touchscreen and stylus on tablets, phones or anything else, with examples of touchscreen devices like tablets etc. demonstrated stretching back to at least the 1950s. The tech has been gradually improved upon ever since, with resistive emerging in the early 1970s and multitouch in the early 1980s (IIRC). Nor were Apple first with handwriting recognition, that dates back a lot further.

          What Apple did do was very much iterative and built mainly on the work of others, and what they did have was largely bought in (e.g. Fingerworks whom they bought a couple of years before the iPhone came out), based on open source software (iOS was based on BSD) or stolen from other companies. Besides the concepts themselves not being new, even the names 'iOS' and 'iPhone' belonged to Cisco and Apple were forced to settle with them (just like Jobs stole both the 'Apple' and 'Macintosh' names which also led to legal action against them). Interestingly, I doubt he even came up with the iPad name himself considering Fingerworks had a product called the 'iGesture Pad', which was a touchscreen peripheral with gestures for PC that ran on Windows, Mac and Linux.

          Credit Apple all you want for opportunistically launching the right product at the right time, marketing things extremely well, or making a huge pile of money, but as innovative inventors? Not so much.

          1. Chronos Silver badge

            Re: XDA

            Beautifully put, conscience. Even Apple's early GUI was heavily influenced by GEM. What Apple now do best is marketing and packaging products to look shinier than they otherwise would then convincing you that your life will be empty without these things. Jony Ive's design skills are not to be belittled, yet to claim the results are anything more than admittedly inspired interpretation of existing technology with much prior art is risible.

            1. Alan Brown Silver badge

              Re: XDA

              "Even Apple's early GUI was heavily influenced by GEM"

              So much so that they litigated to put GEM on PCs off the market.

              1. conscience

                Re: XDA

                @Alan Brown

                Apple had no real case against Digital Research or anyone else over the GUI as Apple didn't invent it, as the courts ultimately agreed. That distinction went to Xerox who first showed their GUI to the world in the early 1970s, Apple were just one of the companies who copied it.

                As part of their efforts to beat Microsoft, Apple legally attacked every GUI that ran on top of DOS, but without success. Interestingly, Apple ignored the non-DOS markets they didn't care about e.g. Commodore had a GUI called Magic Desk running on the C64 computer that pre-dated the Mac (IIRC). Magic Desk had a joystick controlled WIMP GUI, with file manager and document viewer, and would have also been the desktop GUI for the Commodore Plus/4 computer had the author John Feagans not left the company before finishing it. Feagans also later ported GEM for Atari without any legal challenges from Apple, nor did Apple go after Commodore (again) over the Amiga GUI.

                While Digital Research agreed to settle with Apple it was not because they infringed on anything Apple made, it was purely to avoid an expensive court case that they couldn't afford. I sincerely doubt they would have agreed to make any changes to GEM at all if they had they financial resources to have been able to defend themselves from Apple's spurious legal claims. But even then, Digital Research only agreed to a few very minor cosmetic changes to GEM, concerning really crucial and innovative Apple inventions like err... changing a couple of icons and the appearance of the close window button, changing the width of the scroll bars, removing window open/close animations and shaded titlebars, and changing the default desktop view to the file manager! This changed version of GEM was released as GEM/2 and continued to be developed and sold by Digital Research without any further trouble from Apple.

                Amusingly, one of the main developers of Digital Research's GEM was Lee Jay Lorenzen, who had previously worked at Xerox PARC in the 1970s developing their GUI. In effect, Apple took what was largely Lorenzen's work in the first place, implemented it on their own computer, then sued over his next GUI!

                Apple also sued both Microsoft over Windows and HP over New Wave, alleging the theft of the 'look and feel' of the Mac GUI but as you may recall Apple lost both cases once it got to court. Apple later 'borrowed' much from both, ironically including the look and feel of HP's New Wave with it's 3D effect dot shading! Then, like now, Apple routinely use frivolous legal action to both try and harm their competition, as well as just another tool in their PR tool box which serves to perpetuate the idea that Apple invented something better or first. People mostly remember the initial headlines that scream alleged infringement on Apple's property rather than the end results which often don't emerge until years later e.g. whether Apple lost the case, settled, made a public apology, had their patents invalidated, etc. somehow never quite seems to get the same media coverage.

            2. conscience

              Re: XDA

              @Chronos

              What Apple _always_ did best was marketing, that was their chosen strategy from the very beginnings of the company when Mike Markkula made the decision that Apple would be a marketing led company rather than technology led.

              Then as now Apple have never been above 'borrowing' features from their rivals, including GEM. GEM was more advanced than Apple's GUI in many important ways and they feared the competition e.g. GEM/1 offered colour interfaces, multitasking and more that Apple's more basic GUI implementation did not have. Naturally, as part of their PR strategy Apple's marketing department habitually claim each new innovation or feature as their own original invention regardless of where the idea actually originated. As for Ives, I'm no design expert to judge if he is any good or not, but I do know that before the numerous awards and honours started coming in thick and fast, he used to freely admit that his designs borrowed heavily from Braun so weren't really that original either.

              That anyone thinks otherwise is testament to the superb marketing that sold the fiction of the Apple myth to the world. This whole idea of two of young kids who single-handedly invented personal computing out of their garage and who continued to lead the industry through technical prowess and original innovation was never actually true in any way, it was a total fiction that was artificially and very carefully constructed for them by Regis McKenna (the man who delivered both Intel and Apple a public image as innovative market leaders they arguably did not deserve with premium reputations that were misleadingly good considering their actual products).

      2. Chronos Silver badge

        Re: XDA

        The Treo 180 and 270 were the first integrated touch/phone devices. The former was monochrome, the latter colour. I had both. Both had keyboards. Graffiti™ was introduced with the PalmPilot (and the USRobotics branded device, back when modems were a thing) and subsequently carried across to the likes of the Tungstens, which were excellent in their day. It still wasn't the slab format, though. Palm's Treo 650 was the closest they ever came and, yes, it had a keyboard,

        As for the Newton, least said soonest mended. The fact remains that the XDA was the first of what we now recognise as the de-facto standard format for a smartphone.

  6. The obvious

    "Android won the platform war fair and square"

    I'm fairly sure with the level of monopoly abuse google get up to and speed they can achieve it, such an achievement from them was neither fair nor square. Android is still best prefixed with the term Landfill...

  7. ratfox Silver badge

    The good thing is that no matter how dominant Windows was in 2003, and though it is still pretty important today, it is far from being as unavoidable as it used to be. MacOsX is a fairly acceptable alternative, and depending on your needs, so are Linux or ChromeOS. So Android will probably not keep its crown forever. And I would argue that Windows was far more dominant in 2003 than Android is now, considering the most famous flagship phone is an iPhone.

    In fact, there is pretty much no major app or game which only runs on Android and not on iPhones, while there are even now tons of software, in particular games, that run on Windows and have no MacOsX version.

    1. jacksmith21006

      On what measure was Windows more successful in 2003? There are many times more Android devices sold than Windows. There are way more apps for Android then there ever was for Windows. PC sales are at 10 year lows.

      1. Naselus

        There's more android devices, but while Google can currently claim about 85% market share, Windows in 2003 was up around 97-98%. Apple were at their lowest point and had about 2% share. Linux hadn't really taken off in the server room yet, and it's desktop market share was (and remains) less than a rounding error.

        Android is close to matching that level of dominance, but it's unlikely anyone will really match it ever again; hell, Windows still accounts for about 90% of desktop and laptop land even following Apple's surge to cool and Linux's meteoric rise to parity in the data center. Apple's recent laptops are considered a big success, but in terms of actual market share they're at about 6-7%. Linux struggles to rise over 1% in userland, despite now being present on at least some devices in every server room. And outside the more militant Apple fansites and Linux forums, there's no anticipation of this changing.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          "market share", yea

          "market share"

          ... and here we have a fail, right there.

          "Market" is defined as units sold. How do you measure market for a software which is not sold?

          Or is that number meaningful at all when every hardware piece force sells one unit regardless of actual use?

          Basically every Linux machine in work has Windows licence sticker on it even it's not used at all because you can't buy PC:s without Microsoft tax.

          So no, "market share" is basically irrelevant number.

      2. chrishu

        market cap

  8. abedarts

    How Google won the smartphone wars - really?

    I'd say it depends how you define 'won' - there are certainly a lot more Android phones sold, but Apple make way more money off iPhones than all the Androids put together. A quick search shows that Apple make around 80% of all smartphone profit, leaving just 20% for all the rest.

    (I don't own or use an iPhone)

    1. LDS Silver badge

      Re: How Google won the smartphone wars - really?

      Google is not interested in making money from Android itself, or the phones sales (that's an issue for Samsung & C., not Google) but to ensure its dominance in the data access, gathering and ads pushing.

      With an 80% of users in many lucrative markets, it has achieved that - and it can let Apple make money from selling expensive phones. which, often, will still send data to Google because of the services used, and will show ads from the Google empire.

      And because of the prices, Apple won't ever have as many users as Android.

    2. This post has been deleted by its author

      1. DougS Silver badge

        Re: How Google won the smartphone wars - really?

        Apple's market share only declines if you look at smartphone market share. If you look at overall mobile market share (i.e. both smartphones and feature phones) Apple has actually increased their market share slowly the last few years. I've been telling people for five years not to look at smartphone market share, but instead mobile market share, and that as Apple had about 10% of the mobile market share that's about where they'd stay. They actually added a couple points since.

        The only reason Apple's smart phone market share declines is because extreme low end <$50 Androids are eating away at the remaining feature phones. Google isn't getting much benefit from that though because most of those extreme low end phones have Google services removed and replaced - and even if they didn't there's not much profit advertising to people paying $35 for a phone.

    3. gnasher729 Silver badge

      Re: How Google won the smartphone wars - really?

      "A quick search shows that Apple make around 80% of all smartphone profit, leaving just 20% for all the rest."

      Are you sure about that? For example, in the quarter when Samsung had the burning Note problem, Apple was reported to have more than 100% of all profits (because Samsung losses were higher than all other Android profits). It seems to be more like 95% for Apple.

      1. DougS Silver badge

        Re: How Google won the smartphone wars - really?

        Apple's percentage of smartphone profits varies depending on how Samsung is doing (and remember to count just the profits of their mobile division, not the entire company which is in everything from ships to chips)

        I haven't ever seen any statistics which show anything other than Apple + Samsung getting > 100% of smartphone profits. Everyone else collectively loses money, and those who make money don't make much or do it consistently. Its a cold world out there if you aren't Apple or Samsung!

    4. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: How Google won the smartphone wars - really?

      " A quick search shows that Apple make around 80% of all smartphone profit, leaving just 20% for all the rest."

      While true Apple isn't getting much money from advertising while for Google phones are a privacy violation tool to sell more ads, profit for selling the hardware is irrelevant, the profit is taken by different route, by selling the data gathered from phones to forward.

      Very, very profitable business.

      Different business model and therefore different income distribution.

      1. DougS Silver badge

        Re: How Google won the smartphone wars - really?

        Well sure Google is making a ton of money by giving away Android and using it to shove ads in everyone's eyeballs, but if none of the OEMs are making money at it aside from Samsung the question that has to be asked is "why does everyone else keep at it?"

        Either these companies are stupid and keep investing in developing new models hoping "this one will turn things around so we finally make a profit" or they have a source of income that is getting missed in the figures being presented. Are they getting paid to add crapware onto Android phones, like how PC OEMs are? Are they collecting personal information to sell? Any other ideas for how they can make money beyond the selling price? Either they are stupid and keep selling products that are money losers, or they're smarter and more devious than they're being given credit for and have found a way to make money at this game.

  9. DerekCurrie Bronze badge
    Mushroom

    Who's Supposed To Be The 'Winner' Here?

    • Apple's getting most of the profit market share, aka money, not Google or Android smartphone makers.

    • Apple has smartphone security, not any Android smartphone.

    • iOS developers make the bulk of app profits, not Android app developers.

    • iOS devices consistently have the best ROI and TCO (Return on Investment, Total Cost of Ownership), lowering their actual cost.

    So the cockroaches won 'the wars'. I see no point in joining the cockroaches or conceding to them in any 'wars'.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Who's Supposed To Be The 'Winner' Here?

      Almost all of that is utterly untrue. You seemed to have cherrypicked info from a the last decade and not bothered to check it's still true.

      I'm not sure boasting how much money apple make off so few users is really a user benefit, I guess it also helps if the avoid tax using offshore tax havens.

      Android overtook iOS for all revenues about 2 years back.

      Security,iOS has plenty of issues. Not as many as android, but it's marketshare is single figures, so expected.

      https://www.cvedetails.com/product/15556/Apple-Iphone-Os.html?vendor_id=49

      https://www.cvedetails.com/product/19997/Google-Android.html?vendor_id=1224

      1. DougS Silver badge

        iOS App Store still leads Play Store in revenue

        Where "Android" passed iOS in app store revenue recently that was only if you take ALL app stores into account. i.e. it is all those non-Google app stores in places like China and areas of the third world where the vast majority of Androids have all the Googly bits removed that push Android over the top.

        If you just care about OS, then you can say Android has more revenue than iOS and has 85% or whatever market share, but I'm sure Google doesn't see it that way. They aren't getting a cut of that revenue, they aren't getting any ad revenue from those users. Those non-Google Androids might as well be Blackberry or Windows Phone as far as Google is concerned, because Google makes nothing from them - basically a third smartphone OS that's growing much faster than both iOS and Google Android combined.

        I've never seen any figures that break out "Google Android" from "third party Android" but there's a big story out there waiting for someone who does the legwork to find that out. Probably Google knows, but they aren't going to say anything because their stock would take a hit once Wall Street learns that they can't assume all seven billion people in the world won't eventually be locked into Google. They've got about as many as they're going to get, all the remaining growth is low end Android with Google cut out of the picture.

    2. jacksmith21006

      Re: Who's Supposed To Be The 'Winner' Here?

      Apple peaked in their FY 2015. Had worse numbers in 2016 and 2017 while Google grew more than 20% in 2016 and on track to do the same in 2017. Remember Apple FY is one quarter ahead of calendar.

      Android has far, far more market share than iOS. Not really close. Android grew in units sold in 2016 and 2017 while iPhone declined compared to 2015.

      1. werdsmith Silver badge

        Re: Who's Supposed To Be The 'Winner' Here?

        The thought of an Android monopoly is, for many reasons, an unbearable one.

  10. Alan Bourke

    The Amiga failed?

    Didn't really get traction in the US because high-end Apples being cheaper but a major success everywhere else.

  11. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Whatever happened to Worstall ????

    it was he that penned a wonderful explanation of how monopolies - Google being singled out as an example - aren't necessarily always bad.

    The point being that in order to stay a monopoly, the incumbent has to up their innovation or risk being overtaken by #2. In essence, if they want to STAY a monopoly, they HAVE to innovate.

    There was a lot more than that, but it was a very good look.

    I have a of time for Mr. Worstall, as he made me a few quid on bets that the smartphone industry wouldn't even break stride to overcome the "rare" earth metal shortage the Chinese used to try and corner the market. Another example of monopoly not working. (In fact, it backfired, as I recall. The Chinese not yet being that good at capitalism).

  12. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Google is Evil

    Quote

    Google's dominance over our personal lives is far greater than Microsoft's ever was.

    I do not use Google in any shape or form unless I really, really have to. If you search for me on Google then you come up with zip and I want to keep it that way.

    Like other data slurpers they want your life, everything about your life and your friends and well, everything. They will sell it on to anyone willing to pay for it.

    Google was once ok but now? Forget it.

    1. HandleAlreadyTaken

      Re: Google is Evil

      Don't assume Google doesn't know about you just because searches for your name come up with nothing. You have no access to their internal databases . If you could search those, you may find a lot of stuff under your Google Advertising ID. You might find out it's correlated to your home computer's MAC address, to your phone UDID and phone number, to your credit card transactions, probably your travel history (from locations of IP addresses or cell phone towers) and web access history (from Google's DNS servers) - plus who knows what else.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Google is Evil

        "You have no access to their internal databases "

        And you know what? European GDPR legislation demands that anyone will have exactly that or it's a fine, up to 4% of the revenue. That's a serious threat to any company.

        Actually it's already possible (in Google at least), you just need to ask.

        So it is possible to see what Google has accumulated and (later) ask for removal and Google has to do that on physical level, not just mark it as "deleted".

    2. The obvious

      Re: Google is Evil

      What you're forgetting is that it is not always you that is using google or giving your data to them.

      Go to the widget maker online shop and they have a map to their store - from googlemaps.

      That cool font - from googlefonts.

      That javascript library that the site needs - googleapis.

      That instruction video on how to use the widget - youtube.

      ...and so on. You think none of those are giving the goo your very useful marketing data in a way that you actually cannot opt out of if you want to actually get anything done?

      There is far more to not using google than just not using their products and services directly. Block their ASN in your firewall then wait & see how long you last before you need to make an exception...

  13. Joe Gurman

    Erm....

    "Although Apple had once been the pioneer, it now had to settle for life in the Platform's shadow: as a high-margin boutique, catering to a wealthy minority."

    You've just described Mercedes and BMW, Mr. Orlowski. You might just as well have described Apple as, "One of only two corporations to make a profit off designing and selling smartphones." Although hopefully, by 2023, there will be others. I wouldn't be surprised if there are, though Samsung might not stay in that category.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Erm....

      "You've just described Mercedes and BMW, Mr. Orlowski."

      Possibly in the US, but in the Germany (and half of the Europe) both are ordinary family cars except high end models.

      So no, those aren't really luxury items like iPhones.

  14. Muscleguy Silver badge

    Hmmmm

    In my previous Android phone I managed to disable Google though I was unable to utilise the screen real estate the vanished search bar left.

    In this updated version I tried that out of the box and bricked it, forcing a factory reset. So I've settled with denying Google access to the microphone so Alexa is not listening to everything. I scrupulously refrain from touching the search bar and use the Startpage shortcut instead.

    My phone sends no telemetry etc data to Google. I have disabled Chrome. Location services is only on when it needs to be.

  15. Tejekion

    Did the Writer mean Microsoft DOS @ 20

    Windows didn't make it's appearance on Windows until like 1989 didn't it?

  16. Alan Brown Silver badge

    No mention of UIQ?

    Symbian UIQ2 predated all the above and provided many of the concepts we saw on both iphone and android (including the infamous slide to unlock and a battery that would last less than 2 hours if GPS was enabled)

    I still have my motorola A1000...

  17. Scorchio!!

    "Yes, in 2003, Windows turned 20 years old."

    Nonsense. Windows 2 was released on 09.12.1987, and I can remember using it before 1993, which is the date you give in your article. You can find the dates in the archives. As for Windows 1x, it was released on 10.11.1985.

  18. Hubert Thrunge Jr.
    Thumb Up

    I've still got a Nokia N9. And before that a N900, years ahead of their time, but murdered by that c**t Elop and his chums.

    If only Nokia had stopped their infighting with Symbian and released the N900 as a mainstream, and got the N9 out marketed worldwide, the market would probably look different, given Nokia's domination of the market.

    Ifs and ands, pots and pans. Didn't happen. Ahh well.

    Still, Jolla clings on, SailfishOS still looks good, it's slick, but will never grab any kind of market share.

  19. Shawn80

    Is it not Microsoft that won?

    This is fact. Google have lost billions on Android si far. They lost 12+ billion on Motorola. The bought Android. They paid for development.

    Microsoft in other hand gets 5-15 dollar per Android device in licensing fees. Only Samsung Nokia and Ericsson have strong enough patents. For Microsoft it did not matter that they lost since they now get 2-4 billion free each year.

    Still google makes more on iOS advertising then android and Google have to pay 50% to apple.

    Should not the shareholders be angry at google blowing billions in a prestige project?

    Why didn't google use Unix instead of Linux saving android oems the license fee to Microsoft.

    Loosing 10+ billion and corner the market is not impressive. I guess just most experts don't know facts.

  20. Sssss

    A massive European anti-trust suite where they gonover Android with a fine tooth comb to tell them what they cannabis can't do with users data and what services they must offer for the user to get to and manage they're data. That would make them very um happy, so to speak. Followed by regulatory split up of the OS and products from the advertising and data sales, and one another in the States. That's what NORMALLY should happen in such a case, apart from criminal and cival actions.

  21. Munkstar

    Brilliant but cr*p

    Once again a two faced system, appears great but in use is a leaky crasher.

  22. DeeCee

    its really sad that windows phone died, imho it could have been the best platform - having near apple levels of software quality, with hardware variety apple cant offer + i liked tiles on touchscreens, much better than icons.

    now i just got iphone 8 plus(after my lumia 625 died after 4 years of daily usage), one of the reasons was id rather have apple rape my wallet than google do same with my privacy.

  23. Withdrawn

    That old Droid review

    was a refreshing read. Certainly gives a new appreciation for had far things have come.

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