back to article USB stick found in West London contained Heathrow security data

Detailed security arrangements for London Heathrow airport, including the Queen’s precise route every time she passes through, were found on a USB stick left in a West London street, according to reports. The unencrypted USB stick was found lying under leaves on Ilbert Street, a leafy terrace near the famous Kensal Green …

  1. Mycho Silver badge

    Better get her majesty some new fingerprints.

  2. Ledswinger Silver badge

    How as this even possible?

    Assuming that the "loser" of the USB drive was the one who complied it, HOW were they able to export sensitive data like this? I am of course taking the re-reported word of the Sunday Mirror, but lets go with that for the time being.

    There should be at least two people joining the search for new employment, because there either weren't IT safeguards in place, or they didn't work, or the resulting alerts weren't acted on by management.

    1. GruntyMcPugh Silver badge

      Re: How as this even possible?

      "Assuming that the "loser" of the USB drive was the one who complied it"

      Indeed, or that the USB stick wasn't discarded once it's content had been copied to a laptop by a 3rd party, who was perhaps paranoid the stick could be traced and didn't want it in their possession.

      Just because the stick has been returned doesn't mean the security hole is plugged.

      1. katrinab Silver badge

        Re: How as this even possible?

        I suspect that someone else was supposed to find this USB stick, and whoever left it there will have a copy they can drop somewhere else.

        1. Stuart Halliday

          Re: How as this even possible?

          The fact that a USB stick exists with open documents tells us plenty about that organisation.

          None of it good. :(

          1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

            Re: How as this even possible?

            The fact that a USB stick exists with open documents tells us plenty about that organisation.

            That in the current climate of austerity they can no longer afford to lose entire laptops

          2. Commswonk Silver badge

            Re: How as this even possible?

            The fact that a USB stick exists with open documents tells us plenty about that organisation.

            Not sure that's either true or fair. It certainly tells us something about one person within the organisation, but finding that person might be easier said than done.

        2. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: How as this even possible?

          "I suspect that someone else was supposed to find this USB stick"

          Moscow rules Smiley, Moscow rules!

      2. jmch Silver badge

        Re: How as this even possible?

        "Just because the stick has been returned doesn't mean the security hole is plugged."

        Completely true, but not only for this case. As per the quote below...

        "...had the chance passerby been someone less kindly disposed towards the UK than the finder of the stick, the consequences could have been seriously bad."

        ... that seems to assume that not only has this particular incident not resulted in a breach, and completely ignores that this is one breach that is known, and potentially there could have been more where the finder of the stick was not so kindly disposed to the UK.

      3. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: How as this even possible?

        I met someone at a conference who had conducted a test in his organization. New IT rules had just been published and employees had to sign to say they had read them. This forbade using any external memory or device that had not been supplied or checked by the IT dept. He then placed on the ground outside the main entrance a USB stick with the company logo on it. It contained a small program (disguised as lists of salaries) that sent the IP address of the computer it was attached to*, to a test machine in IT.

        He watched the stick to see who picked it up and to check it wasn't picked up by someone other than an employee. Suffice to say most people who picked it up stuck it straight into their work computers and were then summoned for a telling off. Only one person handed the stick into IT and said that they'd found it outside. This self same person then asked if there was a reward for finding it. Another took it home to see what was on it away from the workplace.

        *Apparently he'd wanted to put something on there that also flashed the screen red with a message saying IT policy breach flashing in white. HR very sensibly had said no to this because of Epilepsy fears and to spare the miscreant public humiliation.

    2. Whitter
      Flame

      Re: How as this even possible?

      Compare and contrast:

      "We ... are confident that Heathrow remains secure".

      We have ... launched an internal investigation to understand how this happened”

      Leaking security files obtained outwith the controlled distribution list is itself a security risk. Thus until you know how it happened and can verify you've plugged that hole, you cannot declare Heathrow safe.

    3. nobody_important

      Re: How as this even possible?

      There's a bit of an assumption that this loss was "accidental" isn't it?

      On the train or by the roadside .. ok... but amongst leaves...?

      1. W4YBO

        Re: How as this even possible?

        I have a Kensington 32 Gig stick that has a nearly gooey silicone coating. Usually it sticks to the bottom of my pocket, even through a laundering, but I've found it sitting in my driveway and buried in the recliner cushions.

      2. CustardGannet
        Paris Hilton

        Re: leaves

        A fairly high percentage of the UK is covered in leaf litter at the moment, so it's not really that surprising that the stick was found in a pile of them.

        (Source : personal experience, from having spent much of yesterday tidying the garden.)

        Paris, because she knows about having a tidy garden.

    4. Stuart Halliday

      Re: How as this even possible?

      Absolutely. Doesn't matter how many procedures you make, people will settle down into the lowest state that they can get away with.

      If these are IT professionals, they need serious discipline as they are aware of their responsibilities.

      Other staff are or will exploit holes in your security and they wouldn't tell you about them.

      So, you absolutely must not allow them to do this exporting onto removable storage.

      Sure, they'll complain. But with sensitive documents, you don't let them unless they're encrypted.

      Any IT professional knows this, so there must be a very serious lack of care at this department and now that's public knowledge.

      Not a good position to be in...

    5. CrazyOldCatMan Silver badge

      Re: How as this even possible?

      or the resulting alerts weren't acted on by management.

      It was probably managment that lost it:

      "PFY - I want you to put all this info on a USB stick for me"

      "PFY - I can't read any of it because my Mac doesn't do Bitlocker! Don't encrypt it!"

      "PFY - I don't care that it breaches all the policies. I need to read it at home. Do it or get sacked. Oh - and don't tell anyone or you'll get sacked"

      1. Intractable Potsherd

        Re: How as this even possible?

        @COCM: I think you mean "PHB", not "PFY" (a mistake I regularly make when reading!)

  3. FuzzyWuzzys Silver badge
    Facepalm

    Which only goes to prove yet again that security failures are all about the weakest link, and as per usual it's the dopey, soft squidgy, burger chomping, arse scratching, nose picking, fleshy drongo sitting in front of the screen!

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      I Strongly Object!

      I find great insult in that vast generalisation.

      I never pick my nose and I'm insulted that you'd think so...

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    I think the Brits are more sensitive to associating, being able to touch something physically, with "owning" it and it "being safe".

    Indications:

    - Much later in adopting chrome-books in education than Canada and New Zealand.

    - Greater tendency to use CDs and USB-sticks.

    - Greater tendency to have powerstruggles against networked storage (and, ironically, also a greater tendency to store company data on private cloud-accounts).

    Main surprise is that there are not many more of these discoveries.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      The UK is not exactly built to embrace cloud technologies like other more technically developed countries, our broadband infrastructure expensive at the good end and piss poor at best at the affordable end compared to most of the world (US and Australia aside). Maybe project loon could hover over the UK and get us in to the new age of fastness.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: The UK is not exactly built to embrace cloud technologies

        I thought the UKs experience with clouds was having stuff continually falling out of them.

        That is hardly going to sell them as a storage option.

    2. David Nash Silver badge

      Owning it, yes (for example I recently confused my son by buying a CD which is readily available on Spotify) but not with "being safe". I don't think we are under any illusions about the ability to copy and pass on digital data.

    3. John Lilburne Silver badge

      Why would you give your data over to some cloudy thing. Doing so leaves you vulnerable to a having the cloudy thing shuttered at any time. Ask those that used Yahoo Photos, or a whole bunch of Google apps. Yeah use them as another form of backup but keep your data elsewhere and don't be dumb enough to expose yourself to the risks of being suckered into relying on some cloudy API

      1. DJSpuddyLizard

        Why would you give your data over to some cloudy thing

        "Cloud" is just shorthand for "somebody else's computer"

    4. Chairman of the Bored Silver badge

      References please?

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Heathrow PR-head: 'Security is important to us'

    Why does the media continue to let anyone say this? Why even quote it?

    1. Voland's right hand Silver badge

      Re: Heathrow PR-head: 'Security is important to us'

      It's OK to quote it. If they also quote the round of chuckling from the audience as well.

  6. Boohoo4u

    “Heathrow remains secure”

    ???????

    Obviously not...

    1. hplasm Silver badge
      Facepalm

      “Heathrow remains secure”

      "England prevails"

      "Olympus London has fallen."

      1. Alister Silver badge

        Re: “Heathrow remains secure”

        "Olympus London has fallen."

        They should do a film...

        Oh, wait...

      2. JimboSmith Silver badge

        Re: “Heathrow remains secure”

        “Heathrow remains secure”

        "England prevails"

        "Olympus, London has fallen."

        London Has Fallen

        That was the second worst film I've ever seen

        Olympus Has Fallen

        was the first.

        I started pointing out to my long suffering friend the things they had done in the film to make the assault on the White House easier etc. I was told to detail them later as she was trying to enjoy the film. When we came out of the cinema and I listed them off she said up until I'd pointed these things out she'd thought it was an okay film. She then agreed that the thing was a pile of crap.

        "A bit like doing a movie about a bank heist. To make the writers and producers lives easier there being no alarm and the vault doors are made of wood and left open anyway etc."

        1. Daedalus Silver badge

          Re: “Heathrow remains secure”

          At least she didn't keep asking you which one was Gerard Butler and who was that guy in the Oval Office.

          1. JimboSmith Silver badge

            Re: “Heathrow remains secure”

            Oh no she knows who Mr Butler is.

        2. CrazyOldCatMan Silver badge

          Re: “Heathrow remains secure”

          I started pointing out to my long suffering friend the things they had done in the film to make the assault on the White House easier

          I do something akin to that with my wife (in my case, it's pointing out all the anachronisms in supposedly historical films).

          She won't now go to watch supposedly historical films with me..

          1. JimboSmith Silver badge

            Re: “Heathrow remains secure”

            I've been told not to talk during films if we go out. Apparently my pointing out faults with the film is as annoying as I find actually spotting them.

  7. Velv Silver badge
    FAIL

    "Hmm, I've found this USB stick, lets just plug it into my computer and see what is on it"

    What a great untraceable way to start the spread of malware. Just leave some infected USB sticks lying around and wait for them to be plugged in

    1. Daedalus Silver badge

      This is why you don't use library computers for anything sensitive. Make that anything at all.

      1. Flocke Kroes Silver badge

        Library computers can be handy ...

        ... for examining suspicious USB sticks. Apparently the finder in today's story spoke to journalists. Either this is a very brave man or someone with appalling opsec. I would go with the traditional written statement made from words cut from a newspaper - probably quicker than putting together a disguise and sufficient false ID to get access to a library far from home. Right at the top of the list of things not to do is to use your own printer.

    2. Mr Dogshit

      Well DUH

      1. Prst. V.Jeltz Silver badge

        re Well Duh

        I could happily use a disease ridden library computer to , say , check a train timetable, Or look at kittens. After all its had no information from me.

        1. tfb Silver badge

          Re: re Well Duh

          I could happily use a disease ridden library computer to, say, check a train timetable, [...]. After all its had no information from me.

          Well, except that you're likely to be travelling on one of those trains.

        2. CrazyOldCatMan Silver badge

          Re: re Well Duh

          I could happily use a disease ridden library computer

          Hopefully, the Library computers will be using some form of managed kiosk mode so that any changes introduced by someone get wiped as the machine gets nuked back to bedrock on logoff..

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      malware spreading

      Heads should roll at the library as well.

      1. Mark 78

        Re: Heads should roll at the library as well.

        Why should heads roll at the library? The PCs are there for the public to use. The public have to have a way to save files. USB is the most convenient, so you can't disable it.

        Instead most Libraries have systems in place using things like Deep Freeze to ensure that each machine is returned to it's default state after every user, which along which A/V software, tends to make Malware an extremely small risk on library PCs.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Heads should roll at the library as well.

          The PCs are there for the public to use. The public have to have a way to save files. USB is the most convenient, so you can't disable it.

          Most convenient for the users that is. I hear printers will also work. Librarians like paper.

    4. David Nash Silver badge

      Malware spreading via USB stick

      As much discussed here in the past. That was the first thing that I thought of when I read the article. I wouldn't have known whether there was sensitive material on a stick like that, because I would not plug it into my PC.

      1. Cynic_999 Silver badge

        Re: Malware spreading via USB stick

        "

        I wouldn't have known whether there was sensitive material on a stick like that, because I would not plug it into my PC.

        "

        Just use a live CD to boot into any of the Linux distros and examine the contents of the USB stick on that. You could use any OS that will not auto-run stuff on removable media to list the files, and boot into the live CD only if anything looks interesting.

    5. Terry 6 Silver badge

      USB stick in the car park. I think that's already a well known ploy.

      And at the (volunteer,, community run , as so many are these days) local library anyone can stick a USB into the computers. And it's not only the digital viruses that you need to worry about on those machines.

    6. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      "Hmm, I've found this USB stick, lets just plug it into my computer and see what is on it"

      What a great untraceable way to start the spread of malware. Just leave some infected USB sticks lying around and wait for them to be plugged in

      That's why I always test strange USB drives on someone else's PC.

  8. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

    First question they need to settle:

    Was this an item lost by someone who should have known better or did the finder stumble on someone's dead-letter drop?

    And secondly, if it was the latter, was it smuggled out of an office by someone with access, authorised or otherwise, or was it assembled by someone who hacked into a system or systems that contained it?

    1. Prst. V.Jeltz Silver badge

      sounds a bit far fetched to be honest.

      I'm not buying this at all . Heathrow Airport? The Queens 'route' ?

      "the man found a treasure trove of what appeared to be security-related documents, including routes and timings of security patrols, types of ID needed to access restricted areas, maps of CCTV cameras and otherwise hidden access shafts onto the Heathrow Express railway line that runs under the airport."

      Reads like a spy novel. Possibly all that stuff was made up put there to cause panic , or waste police time , or something. fake news . spread terror . Anarchy!! etc.

      1. Prst. V.Jeltz Silver badge

        Re: sounds a bit far fetched to be honest.

        ...or maybe its the install files for some some RPG game

        1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

          Re: sounds a bit far fetched to be honest.

          The Queens 'route' ?

          Wouldn't she take the Piccadilly line to Green Park> She could then pick up a Horse to back door of Buck Palace. Alternately she could sell the Crown jewels and get a Heathrow Express ticket.

          Now that Uber is out of the picture

  9. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    .. or is it deception?

    It could be that this was an attempt to seed some misleading data and see where it would lead. If it's not real, activities and reports would be easy to trace.

    It's a bit like seeding fake page URLs in a Skype message so you can spot where Microsoft is monitoring your conversation from by the IP addresses in your 404 log (used to be Microsoft US, then MS Ireland for Europe, nowadays it's usually a local Azure cloud).

  10. Anonymous Noel Coward
    Trollface

    At least it wasn't encrypted...

    So we know it was done by the good guys. After all, only criminals, terrorists and child molesters use encryption.

  11. chivo243 Silver badge
    FAIL

    Massive fail

    and no buts.... The data got out...

  12. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Somethings not quite right, if I found a USB stick I would leave it where it was than plug it into a computer.

    I mean, seriously who picks up abandoned USB sticks in this day and age, can't they see the wood for trees?

    Autumnal puns are good but mine are probably going to fall.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Wrong season, wrong medium...

      Now is the Winter of our disc content...

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Wrong season, wrong medium...

        .. made glorious dumber by this son of dork..

    2. FuzzyWuzzys Silver badge

      As good Samaritan I've picked up abandoned SD cards, USB sticks and I've found mobile phones, I attempt to get them back to their owners and in order to do that I have to look at what's on them for clues as to the owner.

      Suppose this USB stick had the whole year's worth of some students notes and they were going frantic about losing them? You find them and hand them back and make someone's day a bit better.

      1. Prst. V.Jeltz Silver badge

        "Suppose this USB stick had the whole year's worth of some students notes "

        Whilest there is no reason to have your whole years work on one stick (as the only copy) you can bet that happens. A failing in the "Absolute minimum" IT literate requirements somewhere. Probably at high school.

    3. Primus Secundus Tertius Silver badge

      @ "Somethings not quite right"

      I would not plug it into my "main computer". But I have others, and can wipe them clean again.

      1. Prst. V.Jeltz Silver badge

        "I would not plug it into my "main computer". But I have others, and can wipe them clean again."

        Just make sure sure Microsoft havent fucked you over by reactiviating one of their classic booby traps like "auto start"

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Just make sure sure Microsoft havent fucked you over by reactiviating one of their classic booby traps like "auto start"

          There's no way in hell I'd ever look at an unknown USB stick using Windows. Some things are simply not worth the risk.

  13. Avatar of They Silver badge
    FAIL

    Someone tell Amber Rudd.

    If she has her way it will happen a lot more. - The unsecure part.

    1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

      Re: Someone tell Amber Rudd.

      She will take immediate action to ensure that USB keys containing sensitive data can no longer be found under piles of leaves.

      A major defoliation campaign involving spraying Agent Orange over west London

  14. Stratman

    The finder

    was so concerned with national security he took the stick straight to the Sunday Mirror.

    I suppose they pay better than the Police.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: The finder

      Depending on what monthly stats they need, the police would either lose the stick, or arrest the finder for accessing classified materials. The Mirror appears a better bet.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: he took the stick straight to the Sunday Mirror.

      Well, that's what he said anyway ????

      There are so many things about this story ... where to start ?

      1) I am presuming that underlying security protocols are designed to identify the source of leaked documents ? I am of course working from the fact that when I was tasked with implementing document sharing my board insisted that each copy was traceable. (Achieved by imprinting a watermark on each download of a document).

      2) Encryption, naturally.

      3) All contents and related information must now be considered compromised, and should be immediately revised and reissued.

      4) ... Oh I can't be arsed.

      Now I'm guessing that (3) isn't happening, which makes me wonder about the provenance of the "leak" in the first place.

      Let's put it this way ... through channels that I shouldn't have access to, I can tell El Reggers that no foreign power - not even the Nork Nutters - has expressed any interest in acquiring this data whatsoever (maybe they already had it ?).

      So this "story" is a put up job, as my Mum would have said.

    3. Hollerithevo Silver badge

      Re: The finder

      They won't hide it, as the Police might.

  15. Flywheel Silver badge

    I would imagine the "lucky" finder of the 'stick will soon be getting a visit from various Agencies to make sure they haven't saved a just-in-case copy on a local machine. No good deed goes unpunished after all.

    1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

      "to make sure they haven't saved a just-in-case copy on a local machine"

      That would be the library machine, otherwise why would he be using it for job hunting?

  16. theN8

    No mention of how recent the files are (last modified dates etc.), though there is mention of a superceded ISMS grading convention, and the fact that the contents were in the single-digit GBs - so for all we know, this USB stick could be a few years old and the real-world risk very minimal (if any) - of course, it could also be bang up to date and a major disaster - we just don't know at this point.

    1. Cynic_999 Silver badge

      "

      could be a few years old and the real-world risk very minimal (if any)

      "

      It was said to contain information about secret tunnels/entrances. I shouldn't think those would change much over time.

  17. Paul Mitchell
    Facepalm

    Don't forget the PHB

    Unforunately it's quite possible to have good "no pluggable media" policies implemented directly on top of old working practices and/or equipment. Thus making the job difficult, if not impossible.

    Cue the "manager" who orders his minions to just "get it done" because he/she doesn't want to look bad, but doesn't care enough to actually do anything about it....

    PS Where's a PHB icon when you need one?

  18. FIA

    Maybe....

    One presumes that whoever did this will shortly be joining the person who found the USB stick on a job hunt.

    I wonder if he's still looking? I suspect the 'good deed' came with some kind of 'reward'.... that's how it works when you altruistically hand something in to a Sunday paper rather than the Police, right?

    1. Peter Clarke 1

      Re: Maybe....

      Any financial reward will be taken into account by DWP and his benefits will be adjusted (down) accordingly. They could also claim he is now employed, stop all benefits and claim it as a result of the tireless efforts of Job Centre staff

  19. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    already happened

    "As for the wider implications, they barely need spelling out: had the chance passerby been someone less kindly disposed towards the UK than the finder of the stick, the consequences could have been seriously bad."

    According to another theory, this has in fact already happened

    /Douglas Addams

  20. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    worse than that talk talk bird

    The amber rudds of the world can breath a sigh of relief that at least someone is playing ball and not encrypting their data.

    Imagine it had been encrypted and the fury she would feel not being able to see the secret data and so be aware it went awol.

  21. Jamie Jones Silver badge

    But when they are, how would we know?

    As for the wider implications, they barely need spelling out: had the chance passerby been someone less kindly disposed towards the UK than the finder of the stick, the consequences could have been seriously bad. ®

    But what about the other 3 carelessly abandoned USB sticks that were found by people less kindly disposed towards the UK, which are now being examined by "baddies" without our knowledge?

  22. bobajob12
    Black Helicopters

    Not so sure it was an accident...

    The material described sounds too broad ranging to be accidentally stored on the same device. For example: the people who need to know about CCTV are not really the people who need to know about HMQ's route through the airport, nor do they need to know about the extra shafts in the rail line.

    So either: the loss is from one of the very small number of people who oversee security at Heathrow and are senior enough to have need-to-know access on all of it, or, the contents of the USB stick were assembled by someone who was deliberately compiling material. In short, espionage.

    Furthermore, dropping it in a park a few minutes from a train station, a major highway and various other escape routes looks like a planned event.

    I smell spying and a (failed) dead letter drop.

  23. m-k

    Having plugged the stick into a computer

    isn't it a variant of a trojan infection that went around a couple of years ago? Some cheapo usb sticks "lost", and then plugged in by the founders, only to be infected?

  24. unwarranted triumphalism

    'Found'

    Sure it was. Why isn't the thief getting an enhanced interrogation?

    And you can shut up about 'civil liberties' - this is national security.

  25. Stevie Silver badge

    Bah!

    Assuming this stick thing is genuine and not some elaborate troll, one question rises to paramount importance in this post 9/11 world:

    Does Her Majesty have to take off her shoes and belt to get through security like the rest of us?

    1. WolfFan Silver badge

      Re: Bah!

      I'm sure that HM Queen Lizzie's corgis would take care of anyone who even thought of making her take off her shoes. They are, after all, herding dogs, and anyone who dared annoy their alpha would be their natural prey.

  26. Chairman of the Bored Silver badge

    Please wake me up and tell me...

    ...that the documents on the stick are watermarked. Please? Just one unique jsteg?

    Once upon a time we had a bad spy problem on this side of the pond. Ames. Got a lot of people killed. Early in his career he left a briefcase of classified material on a train. His management covered up for him rather than hang the bastard ... makes you think a bit about this usb stick, doesn't it?

  27. sloshnmosh

    Malware on USB sticks

    "What a great untraceable way to start the spread of malware. Just leave some infected USB sticks lying around and wait for them to be plugged in"

    This was (is) a problem with Windows PC's of the past (XP).

    "Autorun" function was turned on by default allowing executable code to run on USB install.

    Microsoft finally did something about how Windows handles autorun in Vista+.

    The infamous Stuxnet worm was said to have spread through the use of a U3 enabled flash drive.

    I have a nice collection of U3 enabled Sandisk flash drives that contain a hidden partition with an ISO of various password sniffers and the like which execute on install of an XP machine and sends the results through email.

    The newest version of this is the Bad USB where the flashdrive acts as a HID keyboard and can execute code on Windows Vista on up.

  28. Mike Richards Silver badge

    They were just following Amber Rudd's lead

    After all, who needs encryption?

  29. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Maybe this is an attack against the Sunday Mirror...

    Let's face it. 80%+ of breaches use social engineering, and the whole story just sounds too "nice". Maybe, just maybe, the leafy street is also home to someone quite important, who might have picked it up, seen what was on it, and then taken it into work raising hell about the non-existent breach while causing one themselves. I worry about the bit in the story about Heathrow Security examining the files. Let's hope THEY used a sandpit. I doubt the Mirror did, so that will make interesting reading in a couple of months...

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