back to article TfL hackathon showed data can keep transport running and people safe

If software is eating the world, then hackathons are its fast-food restaurants. Groups of developers come together for short periods to try to solve pressing problems. This happens in sectors from healthcare to retail, and now it's happening in transportation too. London, the UK's capital, is a city groaning under its own …

  1. Tom 38 Silver badge

    It produces a lot of these data using its connected Split Cycle Offsets Optimization Technique (SCOOT) system, which uses embedded road sensors to see how traffic is flowing on the street, and what omissions are like.

    E&OE :)

    Normally I go straight for the "Tips & Corrections", but this is too good a typo not to highlight.

    1. KingStephen

      Hmmm, is this the low omissions zone you've just entered?

    2. Ken Moorhouse Silver badge

      E&EE

      Errors & Emissions Excepted

      I don't think it is a typo, and here is where I think "emissions" makes sense:-

      "The project also included air quality data across London, using a feed from King's College London accessed via the TfL unified API. WSO2 used that to recommend the best walking and cycling routes across Greater London."

  2. John Smith 19 Gold badge
    Unhappy

    YOu can bet they didn't pull that idea together on the day.

    But hackerthons sound like good places to pitch your companies capabilities.

    Just don't expect any real "cold" application to come up from scratch as fast as one someone's probably spent months preping.

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    10m people by 2030

    London is squalid and overcrowded already, and its going to be even more squalid and overcrowded.

    We really need a modern day Black Death followed by a Great Fire to have a proper clear out of the place.

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