back to article 'All-screen display'? But surely every display is all-screen... or is a screen not a display?

Right. Right. Right. No, left. I said LEFT! Oh for the love of humanity, swipe left now! My eyes! Sorry, no, I mean "My EARS!" Is this what it's like to browse a dating site by voice command? I only ask because I hear that dating apps have been introducing Alexa skills and I am trying to work out why. Let's say you're …

  1. Stoneshop Silver badge
    Headmaster

    Let's leave such hyperbole to when the world comes apart, shall we?

    It's getting there, so Apple is just preparing us for that.

    1. A K Stiles
      Coat

      Re: Let's leave such hyperbole to when the world comes apart, shall we?

      Will it technically be hyperbole in that instance?

      Oh well, It's Friday and beer o'clock.

      Keep up the good work. Don't break anything. Do AWESOME!!!!11one!one </gack>

  2. vonBureck
    Joke

    ... or that my right shoe is currently filled with an "all-foot foot"

    No, no, no, you have it all wrong. In case you don't know or appreciate it, you are in fact in possession of an "all-shoe foot" - or indeed two such disruptive solutions. No wonder you don't work in marketing (and no, neither do I).

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: ... or that my right shoe is currently filled with an "all-foot foot"

      I put socks on before putting my feet in my shoes

      1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

        Re: ... or that my right shoe is currently filled with an "all-foot foot"

        "I put socks on before putting my feet in my shoes"

        It's a lot easier than doing it afterwards.

  3. jake Silver badge

    Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

    I mean, mocking basement dwelling nerds AND Apple fanbois/grrls in one column? They'll be calling for your head on a pike before noon at Greenwich!

    1. Dave 126 Silver badge

      Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

      I saw criticism of Apple's marketing in the article (Company employs hyperbole is selling product shocker, in other news ursine creatures defecate in wooded areas, consider me stunned*), but no mocking of Apple users... perhaps I share Mr Dabbs daft assumption that people write what they mean!

      * Yeah, I write what I mean but may use irony as a rhetorical device. Irony signposted by well-known conventions.

      1. jake Silver badge

        Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

        Ever know an AppleFan who didn't fully internalize Cupertino marketing?

        1. Franco Silver badge

          Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

          I've heard quite a few bleating on this week about how great wireless charging is. Fairly took the wind out of their sales when I pointed out I have a Lumia 925 from 2013 which supports this, although to be fair I think most of the shock was that there are phone manufacturers other than Apple.

          1. WallMeerkat Bronze badge

            Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

            Or the Pre3 from 2009, the Touchpad from 2011 both of which can use HP Touchstone for wireless charging.

          2. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

            Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

            So somebody says wireless charging is great (which it is), and you immediately took this to mean they were saying that it was the first, very first and only implementation since ever and nobody else had ever done it?

            Or did you just jump on the first unstated assumption you could find in an attempt to tenderise a post-existential equine?

            1. ibmalone Silver badge

              Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

              When it's being presented as evidence of how innovative and ground breaking a company is, that is sort of the implication.

              1. Dave 126 Silver badge

                Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

                > Also many iPhones are used in Hifi or speaker docks

                They *were* used widely in speaker docks. These days a Chromecast Audio can be had for twenty quid and, like the ubiquitous television IR controller does for TVs, allows you to control the music from anywhere in the room, and from whatever device you have to hand - Android, iOS, Windows, Mac. If someone rings you, you can just nip outside without the faff of unplugging the phone, or interupting the music for others.

                More expensive solutions are also available from Sonos and others.

                People still have speaker docks of course, but tend to use them with their contemporary device, the iPod.

                1. David Nash Silver badge

                  Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

                  "> Also many iPhones are used in Hifi or speaker docks

                  They *were* used widely in speaker docks. These days a Chromecast Audio can be had for twenty quid and, like the ubiquitous television IR controller does for TVs, allows you to control the music from anywhere "

                  The annoying thing about this is that you need to have the power-hungry TV screen on just to listen to music.

                  What happened to audio-only streaming players? I love my old Roku Soundbridge but it's getting a bit long in the tooth.

                  1. Anonymous Coward
                    Anonymous Coward

                    Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

                    The Chromecast Audio doesn't use a TV screen.

                    I've had the one for a while and would highly recommend if you're an Android user. It does work with iOS but the music app has to support it. Apple's and Amazon's don't. This matters less in Android because you can use the built-in casting facility.

                  2. Sgt_Oddball Silver badge
                    Windows

                    Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

                    I just bought a small Bluetooth receiver and hooked that in. It does A2DP and means I have more flexibility with my 70's amp. Bluetooth A2DP is also wildly used and doesn't look too be going anywhere any time soon so is reasonably future proof for the time being and not beholden to any 3rd party.

                    But then I'm tight, prefer simplicity and control of my own property.

                  3. 080

                    Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

                    "The annoying thing about this is that you need to have the power-hungry TV screen on just to listen to music"

                    Not if you use a Chromecast Audio plugged into your stereo or active speaker.

          3. Mage Silver badge
            Facepalm

            Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

            Also many iPhones are used in Hifi or speaker docks, like security radio and DECT phones, the dock is a better charger interface than a wireless pad, which needs correct placement and a wire to a power supply. Obviously only needed for people that can't manage the apple connector (how many kinds since iPhone 4?) or a Micro USB plug. I liked the 3mm approx and smaller coax power jacks. Easy to do in the dark. They should have kept both on phones/tablets so you can plug in a USB device. Also a direct cable works when phone is in your hand.

            The so called "wireless" charging are essentially transformers, inductive not radio coupling, so fails when you lift phone. For poseurs and not so good for travelling.

            1. Dave 126 Silver badge

              Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

              > The so called "wireless" charging are essentially transformers

              So called because there are no wires connecting the dock and the phone. Crazy, right?

              I suppose you object to grandpa calling his AM radio set a 'wireless' because it has wires inside it.

            2. Dave 126 Silver badge

              Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

              > Obviously only needed for people that can't manage the apple connector (how many kinds since iPhone 4?)

              One. Just one. It's called the Lightning connector. Some of its concepts (such as it being agnostic about which way round it is plugged in) were incorporated into USB Type C, which was developed by a forum of which Apple has been a member since 1995. What's your point?

              1. Kiwi Silver badge
                Gimp

                Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

                Some of its concepts (such as it being agnostic about which way round it is plugged in)

                Wow! So stolen from 1920's (or earlier?) audio and power connectors innovative of Apple!

                Hope they patent the idea before someone else points out it's been done thousands of times before steals the idea!

            3. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

              The so called "wireless" charging are essentially transformers, inductive not radio coupling, so fails when you lift phone. For poseurs and not so good for travelling.

              The other question I have about wireless charging is efficiency. It strikes me as a rather lossy way to get energy into a device, so in these green aware days I'd love to know just how much power gets lost due to the fancy method of transfer vs simply jacking in a power cable.

              1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

                Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

                "The other question I have about wireless charging is efficiency. "

                Yep. Isn't the current green advice to always unplug your phone/tablet charger when not in use? IIRC the primary reason given was that all those unused chargers, TVs on standby etc add up to a significant power draw across the National Grid. A wireless charger in that situation becomes just a geeks talking point since the whole point is that the user is far too busy to spend 0.5 seconds plugging it in.

                1. Will Godfrey Silver badge
                  Unhappy

                  Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

                  Wireless charging, the most inefficient, and unreliable way of achieving the desired result.

                  Sorry, forgot. It's apple we're talking about.

                2. Kiwi Silver badge
                  Boffin

                  Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

                  A wireless charger in that situation becomes just a geeks talking point since the whole point is that the user is far too busy to spend 0.5 seconds plugging it in.

                  I fitted a new charging socket to my Lenovo tablet due to a notorious problem with failing USB sockets. Very common to have a poor fit and thus not charge on those models.

                  While most of us aren't affected, I do know one fellow who doesn't always have hands steady enough to fit such a thing, and another with pretty poor close-range eyesight - the standard USB socket that Samsung (and others) use is beyond his ability to get right often.

                  Thankfully, wireless chargers are so common that they're cheap, and were easily retro-fitted to their devices so that instead of having to struggle to get a small plug into a seemingly smaller socket, they only have to put their device down in the right place. If it wasn't for the great many geeks wasting their money on these unnecessary things, they would cost a lot more or maybe would not even exist. While I do hate wastage I also appreciate the effect it can sometimes have on prices, making the lives of people easier because they can afford helpful tech that would otherwise be out of their reach. Ever tried to buy a specialist wheelchair or even some basic "mobility aids"? A couple of bits of plastic with some string attached can cost $hundreds when the components add up to $0.stuffall.

                  1. Dave 126 Silver badge

                    Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

                    @David Nash

                    Yep, the [Chromecast] and [Chromecast Audio] are two different devices, though they are similarly sized and shaped. The latter's output is a 3.5mm analogue port which doubles as a digital optical output. To my mind it has a few advantages over a Bluetooth audio receiver, but it does require the presence of a WiFi network so isn't always suitable for portable speakers.

              2. Solmyr ibn Wali Barad

                Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

                "I'd love to know just how much power gets lost due to the fancy method of transfer"

                90%+ efficiencies are touted for high-current charging (as in some electric cars). Way worse for phones. Did a quick search, it's a surprisingly neglected topic. Lots of noise about saving the planet by unplugging that unused charger, which consumes whopping 0.1W or so, but...wireless charging is still kosher.

                About the best overview is this:

                http://batteryuniversity.com/index.php/learn/article/charging_without_wires

            4. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

              The so called "wireless" charging are essentially transformers, inductive not radio coupling, so fails when you lift phone. For poseurs and not so good for travelling.

              Oh yes, my old XM-643 has true wireless charging via high-power microwaves. Of course, you have to remember to turn it off when you're done otherwise you end up with headaches and these odd burn-like patches on your skin.

            5. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

              Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

              "Also a direct cable works when phone is in your hand."

              I'm sure we've all been in the situation where plugging into a charger while on a call is the only option. I can just see the contortions required trying that with a wireless charger :-)

              "No, I've not passed out or fell asleep at my desk! I'm on the phone!"

          4. Dr_N Silver badge

            Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

            Haven't Braun been charging toothbrushes and razors in this manner for 25+ years?

        2. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

          Ever know an AppleFan who didn't fully internalize Cupertino marketing?

          Yes, I am. I appreciate some of their gear for the ease of use and benefit that they bring to my work, but their hyperbole gets as much on my nerves as people that think I like Apple gear because I'm somehow a slave to their marketing or want to belong to some mythical club that I see with the same opinion as Groucho Marx (if they want me, I'm not interested in joining).

          I like Apple gear for simple, factual reasons, in the same way I am not a fan of Android, but I won't use my use of Apple as a reason to berate others who don't, nor is my use of Apple to the exclusion of anything else (which is what happens with the clubby thing) - I mix where it makes sense. Happy to give you my reasons, you'll have yours which may be interesting but may not apply to my motives and so the world keeps on turning.

          Just stop the irrational bashing. Give factual reasons, present arguments for a sensible discussion, just stop the infantile name calling as it's exceptionally boring.

    2. Voland's right hand Silver badge

      Re: Playing with fire, Dabbsy?

      They'll be calling for your head on a pike before noon at Greenwich

      What was that about the dog which is all bark and no bite...

  4. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

    Say what you mean and mean what you say

    If the gym didn't mean that family membership didn't apply to any group of people who could trace a family relationship they shouldn't have used the term. It's not the brothers' fault that the gym's marketing department weren't capable of thinking through the implications of what they advertised. The gym should simply have admitted the consequences of their error, given them the family membership they'd offered - and then rewritten their T&Cs for future members.

    1. Flatpackhamster

      Re: Say what you mean and mean what you say

      I don't see why we should rewrite every single thing merely to stop pisstakers from taking the piss. Family membership is pretty clear in the minds of everyone who isn't trying to take the piss. It means parents and children. Not a pair of adult brothers. Or pisstakers.

      1. David Nash Silver badge

        Re: Say what you mean and mean what you say

        "Family membership is pretty clear in the minds of everyone who isn't trying to take the piss. It means parents and children. Not a pair of adult brothers"

        Why should that be?

        Many people who are close to their siblings, or parents with grown-up children may be keen to get discounts on things like gym membership, online services (eg. Spotify, Amazon Prime) and so on.

        Think of it like a discount for bulk, or for recommending to family members. Also allowing sharing of accounts between related people is handy.

        Anyway gym membership for children? How many kids do you see in the gym? I bet they make a fortune in fees for children that hardly ever use the facilities.

        1. Warm Braw Silver badge

          Re: Say what you mean and mean what you say

          things like gym membership

          Gym membership contracts are probably the ultimate piss-take - I congratulate anyone who can find a way of turning them to their advantage.

        2. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

          Re: Say what you mean and mean what you say

          "Anyway gym membership for children? How many kids do you see in the gym? I bet they make a fortune in fees for children that hardly ever use the facilities."

          You're probably right, but to play devils advocate for a moment, sometimes it's the only convenient place to take the kids for swimming lessons and just to play in the pool. (for those gyms which have pools, that is).

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Say what you mean and mean what you say

            "I bet they make a fortune in fees for children that hardly ever use the facilities."

            A friend was quite into his local health club - including a personal trainer. He had to schedule his visits to so they avoided the times when the place was seemingly overrun by kids.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Say what you mean and mean what you say

        "Family membership is pretty clear in the minds of everyone who isn't trying to take the piss."

        Amazon says: "Amazon Households enables two adults within a family to collectively manage content and share access to membership benefits"

        They happily let my friend create a "household" so that she could borrow my Kindle for her holidays. The only problem was that it seemed to ignore the "pay separately" tick - so all her ebooks were charged to my card.

        1. IsJustabloke Silver badge
          Trollface

          Re: Say what you mean and mean what you say

          "The only problem was that it seemed to ignore the "pay separately" tick - so all her ebooks were charged to my card."

          Or so she said....

      3. MonkeyCee Silver badge

        Re: Say what you mean and mean what you say

        "Family membership is pretty clear in the minds of everyone who isn't trying to take the piss."

        It's not, hence why the downvotes.

        It's why at say a themepark, you'll get a "family ticket" for 2 adults plus 2 children. No-one requires that the various parties be related, just that they are a group. That's what is generally understood by "family" in this sense.

        Big fail on the part of the gym. Unless things have changed dramatically, 95% of the business of running a gym is getting someone in the door willing to buy a membership. Yeah, you can haggle over price, upfront costs and what promo shit they'll give you, but ultimately you've got a customer in there willing to buy, sell them the damn product*.

        Even if you say "we can't do that under our family policy, but how about the same terms under our "Brothers in arms" deal, where you get us new customers without us spending any effort!".

        * which, as a gym, shouldn't actually cost much per unit sold.

        1. Barry Rueger Silver badge

          Re: Say what you mean and mean what you say

          95% of the business of running a gym is getting someone in the door willing to buy

          I'm always amazed by businesses that work so hard to turn away customers. On more than one occasion I have said, literally, "I want this, I have money in my pocket," but have walked out empty handed.

          1. MonkeyCee Silver badge

            Re: Say what you mean and mean what you say

            Even more so when your business is selling a subscription to a service which is pretty much a fixed cost. Which many subscribers don't even end up using. I understand that the receptionist may not wnt to deal with it, but surely you just kick this up to manglement.

            My usual run in with this is when I want to buy something at retail that I'm going to flog straight on online. It's quite common for a clerk to refuse on the basis that they don't believe it's "fair" to sell to me. So I either talk to the manager/owner (who is often equally confused by the refusal to sell) or go someplace else. Even had the twatty manager of "ye locale gaming store" ask me why I wasn't coming by each week any more to buy 2-3 of the latest GW price gouging set, after refusing to sell said set to me last time I went in.

      4. Kiwi Silver badge
        WTF?

        Re: Say what you mean and mean what you say

        Family membership is pretty clear in the minds of everyone who isn't trying to take the piss.

        Count me as another one who wonders wtf it is you're taking.

        My siblings are family. We lost our parents before I was old enough to legally drink, so my older siblings became my guardians when it suited us. We're also a tight-knit family, with lots of family events involving uncles/aunts/cousins/nephews/nieces and so on, not just blood but those married to blood.

        We're family. If you want your stuff to apply to a small subset of the term "family" then you need to express what you wish the limits to be. After all, a "family reunion" is very seldom just the parents and their sprogs. Often it involves the descendants of the grandparents and sometimes the descendants of the great-grandparents. "Family" is so much more than what you imagine it to be.

      5. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

        Re: Say what you mean and mean what you say

        "Not a pair of adult brothers."

        I don't have any siblings but I still know that pairs of brothers of any age are family. If you can't be arsed to say what you mean you should be prepared to accept the consequences. After all, govt. contractors rely on that principle for their profits.

  5. B*stardTintedGlasses

    Just waiting for the first apple media-cult event to use the phrase "Shock and Awe" un-ironically.

    Full disclosure: I have an iPhone, I like it, but it is a 5S I bought in 2014. Really don't see the appeal of any of the "mind-blowing, world-shaking, game-changing" so called upgrades since then. Especially not at these price points! As always, I will consider all available phones on the market when mine gives up the ghost. (Still going strong so far, don't drink the kool-aid kids!)

  6. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Why do we need bezels ?

    I do not understand why it is not possible to remove bezels completely ?

    I was told it was because of the need for backlighting, but surely that can come from behind the screen ?

    Because once we can remove bezels, we can stick screens together and all have enormous TVs for cheap.

    1. jmch Silver badge

      Re: Why do we need bezels ?

      "once we can remove bezels, we can stick screens together and all have enormous TVs for cheap"

      We can already have enormous TVs cheap. You could get a good quality 48" OLED TV for kess than the cost of the new iPhone.

      Even if you could get a bezel-less 5" screen for 10 quid, you would need 100 of them to make a 50" diagonal screen that would cost 1000 plus cost of frame and electronics to tie everything together.... and you'd end up with an unwatchable mess because it will be prectically impossible to line up all those screens completely flat without visible join lines.

      Bigger* panels are much cheaper per unit area then smaller ones

      *unless you're talking gigantic, like over 60". For thoze sizes yields are lower and prices spike

      1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

        Re: Why do we need bezels ?

        "You could get a good quality 48" OLED TV"

        Really? I thought they were all "Smart" these days and that surely disqualifies them from being thought good quality.

    2. Mage Silver badge
      Boffin

      Re: Why do we need bezels ?

      "because of the need for backlighting"

      No. Three reasons:

      1) The connections to the panel are dodgy if not past the edge of the panel.

      2) LCD needs a seal on all four edges. EL and OLED and true LED can go close to the edge.

      3) Protection of the edge of the display / edge of top glass, or fingers from getting cut.

      Nothing to do with backlights unless the cheap edge type.

      Any display can have a top layer that goes to edge of phone. Then that has to be glued in and have no sharp edges. It's more vulnerable when dropped. Note the Apple active screen/display area is not up to the edge.

      A bezel allows for a more robust and safer design, with easier to replace panel.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Why do we need bezels ?

        I mean stacking TV-size screens, not phone-size screens.

        The 60"+ TVs are the ones I meant we could all have if we had screens without bezels on ( at least ) one side.

        @Mage:

        I don't quite get point 1, but we can have connections on just two sides if they are a problem.

        2 - why can't the seal be very thin ?

        3 - The edges can be slightly rounded.

        Yes, we are discussing *active* screen to the edge, my Palm Pre had "screen" to the edge.

        "Robust" ?! Not any of the phones I've had, and broken.

        1. jmch Silver badge

          Re: Why do we need bezels ?

          "I mean stacking TV-size screens, not phone-size screens"

          Ah yes, that makes much more sense. I think a good quality 42-43" unit can be had for less than 500 quid, so 86" TV for a bit over 2 grand would be nice, considering the largest screen I can se in a quick search is 82" and that's over 4 grand.

          There would only be the requirement of being bezel-less on 2 edges. I still wonder if the fit could be made tight enough that it doesn't leave a cross showing at the joins?

          1. Mark York 3 Silver badge
            Pint

            Re: Why do we need bezels ?

            My local Boston Pizza has about 8 - 12 large screens set up with annoying crosshairs due to the bezels.

            Beer icon because its Friday & the bar manager at our local one looks after us very well.

          2. Ken Hagan Gold badge

            Re: Why do we need bezels ?

            "There would only be the requirement of being bezel-less on 2 edges."

            For rectangular (rather than square) screens, you would need two different handed-nesses of screen to tile 4 of them together and if you are going to restrict yourself to foursomes then you might not reckon it was worth the bother.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Why do we need bezels ?

        Reason #4:

        So I can put the phone in an Otterbox so my five-year old doesn't destroy it.

    3. dajames Silver badge

      Re: Why do we need bezels ?

      I do not understand why it is not possible to remove bezels completely ?

      I can see some attraction in the idea of a screen with no bezel ...

      ... but when it is a touch screen on a mobile device, I find myself wondering how the hell one picks the damn thing up without causing input.

      Surely the bezel is there to give you somewhere safe to hold it?

  7. 0laf Silver badge

    XKCD

    I'm sure he has these ready for every hyperbolic Apple release -

    https://xkcd.com/1889/

    Screen larger than phone kindof nails it.

    1. Dave 126 Silver badge

      Re: XKCD

      Actually, a screen larger than the phone is what Samsung is promising us next year. Seriously, no joke.

      We know that OLED panels can be made flexible, so Sammy is touting some concepts based around that. One is a phone that opens like a book, another is a screen that unfurls like a scroll. What we don't know - and what I assume Samsung is busy finding out - are factors such as minimum bend radii, fatigue and other mechanical considerations.

      Anyhows, a fancy feature is one thing (and the Galaxy range used to be associated with throwing everything in whether it was useful or not), but providing real utility is often a game of integrating said feature carefully.

      1. ibmalone Silver badge

        Re: XKCD

        What I want is a practical on-phone projector. Or just skip straight to the holographic display.

        1. Dave 126 Silver badge

          Re: XKCD

          A pseudo holographic display (some kind of light field tech - think the display equivalent to a Lytro camera) is coming on the Red Hydrogen phone. That's Red who make digital movie cameras, an outfit that initially garnered some sceptism since it was founded by the bloke behind Oakley sunglasses.

        2. gryff

          Re: XKCD

          Saw a demo of a on phone projector in ...2011. The test device was a fully functional phone with a projector inside. Not much larger than mobile phone now (i.e. h/w/d all equiv to a five inch screen phone today)

          You could drive it via the display or shine it at the wall. Next phase was putting a camera next to the beamer to watch for gesture controls. Not done in proto because..how do you stop someone else waving their hands in the image and texting your boss/mother in law/etc..!?

          Still waiting for it to reach the market..

        3. Daniel von Asmuth Bronze badge

          No-screen display

          A projector is an example of a display that does not have a screen built in.

      2. jelabarre59 Silver badge

        Re: XKCD

        We know that OLED panels can be made flexible, so Sammy is touting some concepts based around that. One is a phone that opens like a book, another is a screen that unfurls like a scroll.

        You mean kinda like this one? https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DCciYwyVwAAXCBV.jpg

  8. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

    Not all display? Heresy!

    Dabbsy that was the first thing that went through my mind - that it's not actually all display, or even anywhere close. However I have talked to many people since then and since none of them have mentioned it I assumed that I was just being pedantically literal.

    Thanks for restoring my faith :)

    1. TechnicalBen Silver badge

      Re: Not all display? Heresy!

      That and "Unlimited Broadband". I think they all drink the "new speak", and I'm glad I'm not part of it!

  9. Mage Silver badge
    Happy

    I wondered what Apple meant.

    I'm still baffled by the all screen display, or is it an all display screen?

    Thanks, Dabbsy.

    The latest XKCD phone has some nice features. I'll stick with my Sony Ericsson Xperia Z1 and it's quite ordinary display screen. Thought it had a bezel a little too small at the sides. So I don't have Icons at the edge of the screen.

    1. Mage Silver badge

      Re: it's quite ordinary display screen

      Of course Edit expired and it's its.

    2. Dave 126 Silver badge

      Re: I wondered what Apple meant.

      Also, Sony and Ericsson parted ways in 2012. I'm sure if your Edit worked you would have corrected that - unless you believe Sony buying Ericsson out is part of this 'revisionist history' you accuse people of when you don't agree with them.

      1. Mage Silver badge

        Re: Sony and Ericsson parted ways in 2012

        It's an old phone and still goes fine.

        Honest, it says Sony Ericsson on the front and Xperia on the back. It's a Z1, but I do see the Z1 on wikipedia only says Sony on the front. Maybe for Ireland / UK markets they were slow to change the branding.

        I think mine is just a little younger than my iPhone 4s. Both got S/H. €50 for the Sony and free for the iPhone 4s.

        1. Dave 126 Silver badge

          Re: Sony and Ericsson parted ways in 2012

          I do take you word for it and thank you for your clarification of Sony's confusion (I had a 2012 Xperia L with no SE branding anywhere except for a green circle on the rear... evidence of the transition period).

  10. Alister Silver badge

    I would not, could not, on a train. I could not, would not, in the rain.

    Ah, Dr Seuss, welcome...

    1. Montreal Sean

      "I would not, could not, on a train. I could not, would not, in the rain."

      Ah, but in the end the green eggs and ham were eaten and enjoyed!

      I see an iPhone XI in Dabbsy's future!

      1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

        "I see an iPhone XI in Dabbsy's future!"

        Yeahbut! Is that Kye, Tchee, Shee, Eleven or Ecks Eye?

        1. Dave 126 Silver badge

          "The eye phone ex, for those ignorant of Roman numerals, is pronounced one phone ten... ....We've been talking about the new iPhone, but in the interests of commercial balance we are compelled to mention that Androids are still crap"

          - The News Quiz, BBC Radio 4

  11. TheProf
    Joke

    Boundless horizons

    What I think Apple actually means is that the screen goes right up to the edge of the image and beyond!

    In that way all of the displayed image is displayed by pixels and not by a blank space.

    It's all terribly clever and not inexpensive at all.

  12. DropBear Silver badge

    "Hmm. Personality, looks, intelligence… all these things are secondary to good old proximity, yes?"

    You jest, but they actually kinda are - as the years pass by, once the siege of hormones subsides with age and one sinks into routine half-accepting there might not be anybody in the cards for him/her, proximity may indeed start to factor in prominently; unless one is a well-off freelancer not only willing but also able to relocate arbitrarily at the drop of a hat, "it's going to be someone nearby or nobody at all" slowly gains a more or less factual status and "personality, looks, intelligence" more or less gets replaced by "is willing to put up with my clearly brilliant but, uh, possibly imperfect nature" which is not a quality one can gauge from a profile... Anyway, the all-display screen is indeed moronic.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Unless the other person is willing to relocate to be with you. That could be down to your magnetic personality, endowments - or an accumulation of material assets.***

      ***my cohort friends ask when am I going to get rid of all my junk. The neighbours' kids go wide-eyed and want to know when they will be able to have so many things.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      I'm afraid my standards have dropped all the way down to "breathing".... and still hasn't found me anybody.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        "I'm afraid my standards have dropped all the way down to "breathing"."

        Hmm - possibly that's still being picky. :-)

  13. Any mouse Cow turd
    Joke

    How do you milk sheep?

    Bring out a new iPhone and charge a grand for it.

    1. JulieM Silver badge

      Re: How do you milk sheep?

      Maybe they should call it the Roquefort phone .....

  14. Stoneshop Silver badge
    Headmaster

    or is a screen not a display?

    There's a screen, about 14 by 6.5 linguine, roughly 8 linguine from the end of my bed, but what it's displaying is just the hallway on the other side. And the occasional flying irritant trying to get past it.

    So, no.

  15. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    To those that want their device made entirely of glass

    Try dropping it on the corner from about 10 inches off the desk. that should be enough to kill it, or at least give it a custom sparkling pattern unique to your device.

    If the screen goes right to the edge all round, what holds it up? surely its then wider screenside than behind - and moreover has no space for front facing privacy busting camera, backlights, connections etc.

    Its a bloody phone, not a glass sided carriage clock where you can hypnotise yourself watching the mechanism work.

    That's it - I need a good walk round the corner to a pub.

  16. Potemkine! Silver badge

    Saying it with music

    here

  17. allthecoolshortnamesweretaken Silver badge

    The best way to stun people with iPhones is still to hit them over the head with one.

    1. Chris G Silver badge

      allthecoolshortnames, Or one of these http://www.damngeeky.com/2013/04/15/10517/weaponize-your-iphone-with-these-cases.html

    2. JulieM Silver badge

      That's more likely to result in a broken iPhone.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        That's more likely to result in a broken iPhone

        .. which some of the crowd here seem to consider a win-win scenario :).

        I'm not jumping at this - I don't buy newly released hardware on principle. I'll give it 6 months, and then I'll decide if it's going to be an X or an 8. So far, it may end up being a second hand 7 instead..

  18. earl grey Silver badge
    Paris Hilton

    Pike?

    Surely not Esox lucius?

    She's the only thing fishy here.

  19. Anonymous Coward
    Facepalm

    Like, d'uh!

    Apple is correct - The iPhone X is all screen. It's just Apple - caring about aesthetics and value - chooses to always ensure that the pixels around the edge are always black. They call this special zone a 'Bezel' in honour of Sir Jony B. Ive's middle name, Bêžèl.

    A later version of iOS will unlock these extra pixels, including the ones on the back of the case too, it's just that Apple feels we're not ready for it, and the Evernote app developers were concerned that too much frog green on a single screen would cause children to vomit.

    1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

      Re: Like, d'uh!

      Sir Jony B. Ive? I bet that gives him a buzz!

  20. J.G.Harston Silver badge

    A long time ago....

    I used to teach English to furriners, and 'family' was one of the words we discussed, and I explained that it meant 'one or more parent plus one or more children (of that parent)'. Anything less than that and it wasn't a family.

    1. defiler Silver badge

      Re: A long time ago....

      It's pronounced "nukular family"

    2. Alistair Dabbs

      Re: A long time ago....

      Must tell Sister Sledge that they are NOT family.

    3. the Jim bloke Bronze badge

      Re: A long time ago....

      i checked on wikipedia..

      " kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus and species."

      we are all family.

    4. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

      Re: A long time ago....

      'one or more parent plus one or more children (of that parent)'

      So if SWMBO & I take our grand-kids somewhere we're not a family?

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