back to article Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online'

The government has today announced a “major new drive on internet safety” for which it will enlist the world's largest technology companies in order to make the UK the “safest place in the world for young people to go online.” Going online is serious business for young people, who can now encounter every flavour of evil that …

  1. Voyna i Mor Silver badge

    Safe...

    From being exposed to ideas the government doesn't want you to know about. I have to say, I never expected that fascism in this country would have a geography degree from Oxford, or that its puppet in the Home Office would have had, as a claim to fame, the job of "aristocracy co-ordinator" on Four Weddings and a Funeral (unless this is a very good joke by a Wikipedia editor.)

  2. malle-herbert Silver badge
    Childcatcher

    Two words spring to mind...

    Nanny State...

    1. Dan 55 Silver badge

      Re: Two words spring to mind...

      It sounds like the bubble-wrapped Internet with comprehensive logging is becoming mandatory.

      What's wrong with configuring your own parental control software or setting your own router rules? Apart from the government not deciding what is safe and what isn't and not logging everything, obviously.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Two words spring to mind...

        There will never be a bubble wrapped internet no matter how much they try.

        1. Elmer Phud Silver badge

          Re: Two words spring to mind...

          'cos there's always a queue of people waiting to pop it?

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Two words spring to mind...

            A bubble popper know as 4chan

            1. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Re: Two words spring to mind...

              >implying 4chan hasn't completely been taken over by normalfags for years

              1. m0rt Silver badge

                Re: Two words spring to mind...

                So...where do parents fit in all this? Because they bloody well should do parenting.

                So, pensions screwed, people working till they are in their 80s, elderly care screwed, nhs on its knees, cuts everywhere, energy costs rising, divided nation, lack of workers rights, subsidised wages because somehow a decent wage is an affront to ukplc.

                "But hey - lets tackle something else that we know we can't actually fix and lets fail at this too."

                UK Gov - take a step back. Get out of your collective arses and do some actual proper governing as opposed to silly policies that you think will get you public opinion, but will end up just costing taxpayer more for less.

                1. Anonymous Coward
                  Anonymous Coward

                  Re: Two words spring to mind...@ m0rt

                  Your comment should be forcibly tattooed on the forehead of every single member of parliament. Can we setup a Kickstarter campaign to raise the money to do this?

                  MPs: Tossers every one of them - either for doing the wrong thing, or for being ineffectual in opposing the apparently universal shit-headedness of all recent governments.

      2. Dave 15

        Re: Two words spring to mind...

        Whats wrong with doing something with your kids other than sticking them in front of a computer?

        1. Cuddles Silver badge

          Re: Two words spring to mind...

          "Whats wrong with doing something with your kids other than sticking them in front of a computer?"

          What's wrong with sticking them in front of a computer? It's no different from sticking them in front of a TV, or sticking them in front of a book, or any of numerous other activities. There's plenty of both fun and education to be had in all kinds of places. The important thing, as always, is that they need appropriate education and supervision. Throwing your kids out the house to hang around smoking on a street corner for hours on end every day isn't a great idea, but that doesn't mean we ban the outdoors. Similarly, sticking them in front of a computer to do whatever they like with no supervision for hours on end every day is a bad idea, but that doesn't mean banning computers is the solution.

          If anything, given how important computers and programming are, not sticking your kids in front of a computer from time to time is practically neglect - how are they supposed to function in the modern world if they never learn to use such important and ubiquitous tools?

      3. Trigonoceps occipitalis

        Re: Two words spring to mind...

        @Dan 55

        "What's wrong with configuring your own parental control software ... "

        Because my children and their partners wouldn't have a Scooby. In any case I suspect my 8 year old grandchild can get around any blocks they put in place. Often said but none the less true. I can offer only limited help, sometimes I get the "Dad's got his tinfoil hat on again" look.

        Fortunately they are able to make sure that their children get the correct advice and help about social media etc. They will see nothing wrong with the government mandating blocks on content - partly because they understand their technical limitations in this area and because they have already sold their soul to Google, Facebook etc. It is just part of normal life to them.

    2. Voland's right hand Silver badge

      Re: Two words spring to mind...

      You sure? I am pretty sure you got a few letters wrong.

      I thought you meant Nazi State.

      All hail our future great chancellor(ess) Adam Sutt... Sorry Theresa May. All that not hail, Lark hill awaits you - so we make the environment safe, you understand...

    3. H in The Hague Silver badge

      Re: Two words spring to mind...

      My first thought too. And that's just what the Conservatives claim to protect us against:

      "But Conservatives in Government have stood up for hard-working people from stealth taxes and nanny state interference."

      http://press.conservatives.com/page/11

      Pity the Trade Descriptions Act 1968 does not apply to political parties.

  3. Dan 55 Silver badge
    Coat

    Going online is serious business for young people, who can now encounter every flavour of evil that humanity produces without even leaving their homes — something which wouldn't have been possible for their parents watching the BBC in the '70s.

    I beg to differ, we had the scary Tom Baker period in Doctor Who, before he got toned down into the not scary Tom Baker period.

    Icon is the Doctor reaching for his coat and scarf.

    1. Rich 11 Silver badge

      If you've never seen multiple crewmembers murdered by an anti-matter Mr Hyde you've never lived.

      1. TRT Silver badge

        Being a bit of a 60's/70's/80's TV enthusiast, I can add that whilst TV today is more porn, more gore, more brutality, more in-your-face, the older stuff is more scarier and more nastier by any measure you wish to choose. Threads? The Changes? Even Blake's 7 just killing everyone at the end, bang! Dead, gone. Devil worship at every corner, evils under the bed, and the humanity of the evils... rape, for example, in many James Bond films even.

        1. Dave 15

          TV today

          TV today is a pointless waste of energy, made even worse by the offensive tactics of the BBC and licence collection who bully in a most disgusting way anyone who decides not to have one of the infernal contraptions to watch pointless American and Australian soaps.

        2. Triggerfish

          Having grown up with some of it. I can say legitemately blakes 7 was pretty damn dark, Threads, The Mad death, Quatermass, and who the hell looked at Sapphire and Steel and thought yeah faceless ghosts whistling old war songs that's definetly a kids program?

          1. TRT Silver badge

            Watership Down, Plague Dogs etc. Films. Animated ones at that. Plague Dogs was a UK A rated, regraded to PG. Watership Down was a U! And you can hardly get darker than those too, surely.

            1. Triggerfish

              Oh God watership down and plague dogs, I must have repressed them

              Must say "When the wind blows" was a great cartoon for a young kid living in London to be shown at school also. Expecially with everyone saying things like "yeah they'll drop 3 or 4 on us at least".

        3. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          " the older stuff is more scarier "

          The TV stuff that scared me in the 1950s was: "Quatermass"; "Quatermass and the Pit"; "Nineteen Eighty Four"; Polio public information films. Dad was a volunteer in the Civil Defence - but no one really took on board just how a nuclear attack would devastate the UK.

          Magazines like "Health & Efficiency" circulated in the playground - and gave us a black & white nipple-less, pudenda-less, mis-education about the human body.

          For all our school days we were exposed daily to mutilations, tortures, and murders in graphic form - held up as sanctity and punishments via the social control of organised religions.

          1. Triggerfish

            How about The Day of the Triffids? I seem to remember the eighties version being somewhat more hardcore than the recent effort.

            1. TRT Silver badge

              I know the programme itself was a bit shit... but...

              The Tomorrow People. Theme music & opening titles. Enough to make you crap your pants.

              1. Colin Millar

                Re: I know the programme itself was a bit shit... but...

                Not nearly as shit as the recent US remake - just a bunch of pouty kids seeing who could shout "It's all about Meeeeeeeeeeeeeee!!!!!!!!!!!" the loudest

                1. Prst. V.Jeltz Silver badge

                  Re: I know the programme itself was a bit shit... but...

                  Although I whole heartedly agree that all the above programmes are quality and scary.

                  and TV was so much better before , where do i start ? cowell ? reality blah? , no basically everything ....

                  Do you think it affected you more because you were children?

    2. Elmer Phud Silver badge

      Arrr, ye've got a woman's scarf, so ye have

      1. TitterYeNot
        Coat

        "Arrr, ye've got a woman's scarf, so ye have"

        Arrrr, and I'll wager that floppy fedora never had 16 shipwrecked mariners tossing in it...

    3. Gritzwally Philbin

      Yeah, but scary Tom Baker was awesome when he kicked Chancellor Goth's ass in the Matrix in the Deadly Assassin. 9 year old me, was terrified and awed at the same time. Nice Tom Baker who upbraided Leela for killing people wasn't nearly as fun.

      1. TRT Silver badge

        Nice Tom Baker who kept telling Leela off was hilarious. "You can't go around using Janis thorns" then takes an elephant gun out on the Thames to go rat hunting.

        A theme revived somewhat under McCoy's outing where he kept telling Ace off for making Nitro 9 then on a few occasions asked if she'd ever listened to him about it, and could he have a little bit for a special job.

  4. 0laf Silver badge
    Big Brother

    Cynics unite

    They only way to truly be safer (not 'safe' that's impossible) is to teach the population (adults and kids) to question what they see. To challenge what is printed on the web and what is sent to them in emails, messages etc.

    But then if they start to intelligently question things in the cyber world they might look up and question things in the real world. They might develop an awareness of what is actually going on.

    We don't want that do we?

    Lets just pay lip service to it and keep everyone in their boxes.

    1. Elmer Phud Silver badge

      Re: Cynics unite

      My kids had no restrictions to their access.

      they were taught the basics 'if it looks too good to be true - it ain't', 'if you don't like it, leave the page - if it's really bad let me know, (no judgements)', 'trolls are easy to spot' etc.

      One was on on Habbo Hotel (oh, these fools have no idea how it was back then) and said that someone she'd not met or chatted to before was busy being chatty and asking her to 'download a cool game'.

      I explained to her what was going on and that I wanted to to some screen grabs as proof so she threw out a shiny lure and started reeling him in by asking innocent questions about the 'game'.

      Eventually he twigged and she let him know that we'd got info on his user name and several screen shots which we were sending to Admin.

      Dunno if it did anything other than make him change his underwear but as an educational tool it was priceless.

    2. Dave 15

      Re: Cynics unite

      Most obvious things to question are government press releases and statistics.

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online"

    Good Luck with that

    1. hplasm Silver badge
      Meh

      "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online"

      Tell them to leave it alone, then.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online"

        But... But... The politicians like to think they know something about the internet when, in fact, they haven't the faintest idea about how it works.

        1. Arthur the cat Silver badge

          Re: "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online"

          The politicians like to think they know something about the internet when, in fact, they haven't the faintest idea about how it works.

          The internet, the economy, business, science, technology, arts, sport, culture, etc, etc, ...

          To rephrase an old saying, those who can do, those who can't try to get elected.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online"

            Those that can, do. Those that can't, teach. And those that really, really can't, try to go into politics.

      2. Smooth Newt
        WTF?

        Re: "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online"

        How are they going to do that then? Even safer than China or Burma, where there is strict Internet censorship? How about North Korea, where they don't really have an Internet and what they do have is firmly under Government control? Their Internet there is probably even safer than China's. Societies with this degree of oversight and "Internet safety" have far more serious problems a few dodgy websites.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online"

          Something tells me this is PR and nothing else

          1. 8Ace

            Re: "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online"

            "Something tells me this is PR and nothing else"

            Sorry no this is something much more sinister. They are trying to establish the concept of protection as equivalent to restricting access. Once that idea settles in for the majority who don't care as long as they have Facebook, the valves will be slowly closed until we can only see what we are allowed to see.

            1. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Re: "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online"

              in the end they will never be able to restrict access and the idea wont settle in for the majority who do care about this, they will never stop us seeing what we are not allowed to see.

              1. Anonymous Coward
                Anonymous Coward

                Re: "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online"

                "[...] they will never stop us seeing what we are not allowed to see."

                They will make criminals of everyone - and go beyond those bounds to instil fear of inadvertently crossing a blurred legal line. Then it will become everyone's legal "duty" to inform on anyone who they suspect of indulging in "immorality". Paranoia is contagious.

                "The number of suspected online child sex offenders identified across the East of England has nearly trebled in three years, the BBC has discovered."

                http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-northamptonshire-39075753

                1. Anonymous Coward
                  Anonymous Coward

                  Re: "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online"

                  in the end all of that will fail and not work

                2. Anonymous Coward
                  Anonymous Coward

                  Re: "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online"

                  It likely they wont be able to make criminals of everyone or instil fear of inadvertently crossing a blurred legal line and most people wont inform on anyone.

                  1. Anonymous Coward
                    Anonymous Coward

                    Re: "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online"

                    "[...] and most people wont inform on anyone."

                    Unfortunately history shows that it happens very easily in human society. For example: The Reign of Terror after the French revolution; Russian, German, Chinese totalitarian regimes in the 20th century. To a lesser extent the McCarthy purge of "UnAmerican Activities".

                  2. DropBear Silver badge

                    Re: "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online"

                    "most people wont inform on anyone."

                    It may or may not be "most", but that's completely irrelevant. Plenty of them will, whether because they believe it right, they profit off it somehow or they've been blackmailed to - also irrelevant. All that matters is that informants _do_ work.

                    1. Anonymous Coward
                      Anonymous Coward

                      Re: "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online"

                      in the end informants of any kind wont work

          2. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online"

            "Something tells me this is PR and nothing else"

            Much worse than PR. This is an attempt to justify ever increasing surveillance and censorship. Theresa May appears to be another religiously motivated dictator - who unfortunately has her hands on the levers of power.

            1. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Re: "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online"

              in the end surveillance and censorship will fail

        2. Naselus

          Re: "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online"

          "How are they going to do that then? Even safer than China or Burma, where there is strict Internet censorship?"

          Y'know those times when you ask a question, and then inadvertently answer it in your own follow-up question?

          Yeah, that.

  6. Flocke Kroes Silver badge

    A quick trip to cloud cuckoo land

    Imagine the new nanny state internet bill gets signed into law. It is an instant success and kiddies immediately stop sexting each other. Instead they sneak off behind the shed to play doctor when their parents are distracted.

    What was the point of all this?

    1. DropBear Silver badge

      Re: A quick trip to cloud cuckoo land

      Twofold: a visible "accomplishment" and tighter control on who does what. Who cares about some kiddies...

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: A quick trip to cloud cuckoo land

        they will never be able to put tighter control on who does what and they already fail on doing that already

  7. Zog_but_not_the_first Silver badge
    Big Brother

    Then...

    ... resign.

  8. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Karen Bradley CV

    Okay, the 'Claire Perry test' : (aka,does this person know what they are talking about).

    "Karen Bradley MP PC.

    Buxton Girls' School and Imperial College London, where she graduated with a BSc in Mathematics"

    Quite promising so far, imperial and maths, refreshing change from the usual Oxford and PPE.....

    "In 1991 she joined Deloitte & Touche as a tax manager, and after seven years she became a senior tax manager with KPMG. In 2004 she set up business as a fiscal and economic consultant before rejoining KPMG in 2007, where she remained until her election to the House of Commons."

    That was less encouraging really. No techie stuff at all there, except possibly Excel. I'll bet she can do a mean pivot table.

    So conclusions. The Perry Test Failed. Again. Grossly under qualified and under experienced to be making these sort of executive decisions. The ministry of fun is traditionally somewhere you can put people who fall into conservative parliamentary minority groups (ie, anyone who isn't a wealthy, publicly educated oxford graduate with a penis), to make the cabinet look a little more diverse. Digital skills and knowledge should surely not be impossible to find in this day and age?

    1. Tom 7 Silver badge

      Re: Karen Bradley CV

      A BSc - but not Hons. And then straight into a non-technical job So better than a PPE but only up to clicking the headings on a pivot table. It is terrifying the lack of real digital skills and knowledge 'up there'. I wonder if they are as afraid of technical nous as most managers seem to be.

      1. CrazyOldCatMan Silver badge

        Re: Karen Bradley CV

        So better than a PPE but only up to clicking the headings on a pivot table.

        Can anyone think of an MP that's actually had a *real* job? The only one I can think of is Paddy Pantsdown.. (Royal Marines/SBS)

    2. Toltec

      Re: Karen Bradley CV

      "Digital skills and knowledge should surely not be impossible to find in this day and age?"

      Finding someone with the right skills willing to take the job probably is.

      1. Bernard M. Orwell Silver badge

        Re: Karen Bradley CV

        20 years an IT professional here, currently a civil servant (in IT) and now studying PPE. Decided that its time to get stuck in.

        Wish me luck?

        1. CrazyOldCatMan Silver badge

          Re: Karen Bradley CV

          20 years an IT professional here, currently a civil servant (in IT) and now studying PPE. Decided that its time to get stuck in.

          Wish me luck?

          You'll go far. As in "far, far away from ever getting a real job in Government"..

    3. Dave 15

      Re: Karen Bradley CV

      Sounds like she would be qualified to take on the role of Chancellor and sort out the tax system (poacher turns game keeper). Of course she will never manage to do that, you never put a minister in charge of something they might understand, if you did that they might sack the useless civil servants that supposedly serve them

  9. Permidion

    Parents ...

    ... are just giving up any effort at supervising their kids and simply want to rely on "technology safeguard" to do the job for them.

    I doubt it will have any real benefit at protecting kids and will just yet again reduce everyone privacy

    1. Dave 15

      Re: Parents ...

      NOPE, parents do NOT rely on any safeguards. Parents come largely in two forms, those who look after their kids - taking them to places to do things and perhaps help them to use the computer safely and those who don't care and let their kids do what they like when they like... and if those kids are on a computer doing porn it means they aren't on the street shooting crack or breaking old womens legs. Frankly the government is trying to ramp up an excuse to further censor and monitor us all. Worse than 1984 ever envisioned but of course if you disagree you are painted as a dangerous perverted terrorist who beats and buggers kids and should be locked up for societies good

  10. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Turn it all off

    HMG, if you are that worried about the evils of the internet, turn it all off, go on, I dare you.

  11. alain williams Silver badge

    Trying hard to give the appearance of being useful

    Government just chasing the wrong target - again; they seem to think that the only people who matter are tut-tutting Daily Mail readers. This is the lot who have come out with the mind boggleinglly stupid guidance that Streets should not be named after local heroes ‘in case they are paedophiles'.

    Do we know what is current government guidance at tilting at windmills ?

  12. Dave 15

    For safe read censored/controlled/spied on

    This is about ensuring that no one can criticize the government without being caught. May even eventually be used as an excuse to reinstate the ID card scheme (another tax on being here).

    Frankly come the glorious day we should put all these politicians on a one way rocket to the sun.

    1. Dave Schofield

      Re: For safe read censored/controlled/spied on

      >Frankly come the glorious day we should put all these politicians on a one way rocket to the sun.

      What a waste of a perfectly good rocket and fuel, and what did the sun do to deserve that? (unless you meant strap them on a rocket heading towards the headquarters of The Sun?).

      1. TheOldGuy

        "strap them on a rocket heading towards the headquarters of The Sun"

        That gets my vote...

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: For safe read censored/controlled/spied on

      In the end they will never be able to control or censor us and many are fighting to make sure the ID scheme does not come back,

  13. MJI Silver badge

    Safer internet

    Until people can open emails without getting crypto blackmailed.

    Until people can surf without the fictional Cheshire Police page internet is dangerous.

    Unpleasant pages are not dangerous.

    Cryptoworms are.

    Viruses are.

    GET THE PRIORITIES RIGHT GOVERNMENT

    GET GCHQ tracking the cryoto virus teams, then send in the SAS to clean up the mess. They are supposed to be world class so I am not asking too much.

  14. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Kids can do research, they can work out VPN.

    Good luck stopping them, gov haven't a clue.

  15. inmypjs Silver badge

    So remember kids..

    If you want bypass any of the web blocking these moron politicians put in place install opera with its free built in VPN and move your web access offshore.

    Just tell your mum Opera has better privacy and is more secure than other browsers.

  16. Haku

    Next they'll want to make website blacklists a thing of the past.

    By making website whitelists instead.

    Isn't that what North Korea have done?

  17. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Re: "Gov wants to make the UK the 'safest place in the world to go online

    So will the UK be importing the underlying Golden Shield Project technologies as well, or just its policies and dogma?

  18. lowwall

    It ain't that easy

    Any of the commenters above have young children? I have a 3-year-old and an 8-year-old. It's hardly as easy the comments above suggest. When I'm minding the young one, how am I supposed to constantly monitor her older brother? I can't cut off net access, his school requires much of his homework be done through websites or apps, including Google Docs.

    I can't tell you how many hours I have spent fiddling with privacy and parental control settings and applications between a chromebook, a tablet and the Xbox One his maternal uncle (and thus my wife) insisted on. And he still constantly finds loopholes. For example, I've cut off his YouTube access on all the devices. So imagine my surprise when I get copied on his e-mail that he has comments on his new video. He was making videos of himself and his sister with the tablet and, thanks to Google's integration of everything, sharing them to YouTube via the camera app.

    And, BTW, this isn't about porn that I can just filter away. It's about the complete jerks that populate every corner of the web, from commenters on newspaper websites to popular YouTube stars to how gamers talk to each other. Starting around age 5, kids eat that stuff up. They think it's cool and it clearly affects how they act.

    Frankly I would welcome some regulation here. Not of internet content, but requiring that devices offer useful and usable parental controls. For example, the parental controls on standard chromebooks are very limited. Such as you can either allow all apps or none. So if I want him to do school work on a chromebook, I have to allow alll. What is most annoying about this is that the chromebooks that google sells to schools can be tightly configured even down to per app time limits. Why can't they make that software available to parents? And why can't I easily configure an XBox to do something like only play games, allow anyone to play anything E10 and below, while disallowing chat and purchases? And Google needs kids' accounts - ones that let parents whitelist allowable activities. They let me do this with my staff at work so I know they have the capability.

    1. stu 4

      Re: It ain't that easy

      lowwall - amazon fire has kids accounts. I got a few of em for my nieces at xmas. I dunno how useful they are - but you basically 'admin' the tablet, and they get an account that gives them access to only the apps and stuff you want them to have access to. I think it would be pretty limiting to >12s maybe, but for younger kids it might be worth a look ?

      1. lowwall

        Re: It ain't that easy

        I do have a cheap Amazon Fire tablet. We bought it for my son when he was 5 and have handed it down to his sister. It does work well if all you need a tablet for is to temporarily distract the little ones. We give it out where their patience runs out in the car or at restaurants. It's especially useful if you have Amazon Prime because they give you versions of some kids' games that have in-app purchasing stripped out and you can download several videos at a time for offline viewing. But it falls apart if you need to go outside Amazon's walled garden. Even after sideloading Google Play, I was unable to get certain apps he needed for school to work. And it suffers from the same lack of granularity in its parental controls that everything else does. For example, you can set a total time limit for all apps, but not individual apps nor can you distinguish between school and entertainment apps.

  19. David Nash Silver badge

    @lowwall

    "It's hardly as easy the comments above suggest."

    Well said. I think the commenters who regularly tell people how to parent are not parents themselves.

    You can't just cut off internet access and "do something with your kids". And we can't nanny them all the time they are online because we have a life, other kids, housework, a job etc. So you need to talk to them, yes, but you can't supervise 100% and yes they know how to find a VPN, for instance to enable snapchat via the school wifi.

    I am not advocating mandatory government content filters and I don't have a simple solution but it's just not that simple.

  20. Triggerfish

    Making safe

    You will log on, there will be a great firewall showing as a grey screen, with some options.two buttons will say; .gov sites, bbc.

    The last will lead to the rest of the net and be labelled; Thoughtcrime.

  21. Wokstation

    No Internet Upstairs

    That's our rule. Ok, so he's only 11 and a lot is still to come, but the screens are in that living room and a condition of having a phone is its subject to us looking at it at any time, it's codes must always be known to us, and it doesn't go upstairs.

    That, and actually communicating with him, seem to be helping... So far.

  22. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Ha ha ha

    ROFL

    I feel safer already.

    /sarcasm off.

  23. JustWondering
    Meh

    Really?

    Safest place in the world to go online? I thought North Korea had a firm grip on that distinction.

  24. codejunky Silver badge

    hmm

    Isnt online where we go to be safe from them? Who decides what is and isnt safe? Last time the gov designed anti-terror laws they were turned into general use weapons against our own freedom. So how will such overreach be stopped?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: hmm

      by making sure they dont overreach and find and use ways to get around censorship and spying, in the end they will never control what is online even tho that what they want.

  25. localzuk

    Why are the Tories so obsessed?

    With interfering with people's home lives? Parenting is for parents to do.

    The Tories seem to be obsessed with reducing rules for business, but increasing them for individuals. They should keep their noses out of it!

  26. Gramscikicksfoucaultsass

    This will totally work- just like banning under 18's from buying alcohol stopped me from getting pissed on scrumpy when i was a teenager. Just like putting "Parental Advisory" on records featuring 'colorful' lyrics stops kids from buying them. Making certain websites off limits will make them more attractive and kids will somehow obtain the details of an adult's log in details which allows them to access those sites (and possibly draw some unwarranted attention to the surfing habits of the adult whose details they use).

    Meanwhile, it allows the Government to portray itself as 'caring' and 'pro-family'; all the time introducing policies which are uncaring and positively detrimental to the health and well being of many families.

  27. Rebelyell

    1984!

    What? This remind me of the book: 1984!!

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2019