back to article Euro bloc blocks streaming vid geoblocks

European Union citizens will soon be able to carry their streaming video subscriptions across borders, without virtual private networks but not necessarily for free. Negotiators of the European Parliament, member states and the European Commission have agreed to lift geoblocks within the EU, as part of copyright modernisation …

  1. A K Stiles Silver badge
    Coat

    2018?

    So we'll have the capacity for maybe 3 months, then it'll get taken away from us in an attempt to make Britain great again...

    1. King Jack

      Re: 2018?

      Don't forget on that day we'll get cheap bent bananas again.

      1. Paul Crawford Silver badge

        Re: cheap bent bananas?

        I thought that was our glorious leaders already?

      2. John Lilburne

        Re: 2018?

        And courtesy of Bill Cash we can buy petrol in peck, and carpets measured in chains.

    2. Voland's right hand Silver badge

      Re: 2018?

      And why do you think Murdoch's rags so vehemently supported BrExit?

      It really had nothing to do with him bidding to grab the rest of Sky. Really.

    3. TheVogon Silver badge

      Re: 2018?

      So we can look forward to watching our Dutch TV channels anywhere in the EU? Oh, wait, we were the only country trying to block them...

      http://www.broadbandtvnews.com/2012/03/08/ofcom-complains-about-dutch-sex-channels/

  2. Owen Sweeney

    Move along

    Nothing to see here, UK readers. Move along...

    1. Dan 55 Silver badge

      Re: Move along

      Well, maybe there will be for three months where the BBC will set up glorious 60p streaming on iPlayer for the rest of the EU.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Move along

        "Well, maybe there will be for three months where the BBC will set up glorious 60p streaming on iPlayer for the rest of the EU."

        Oh boy, from the article "Freebies such as TV catch-up or radio broadcasters won't yet be obliged to make their services portable"

        1. Anonymous Custard Silver badge
          Headmaster

          Re: Move along

          Given all the fuss they've made about now requiring a £145.50 TV license to watch iPlayer even if you don't watch anything via other means, I'd hardly call it free...

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Move along

            "Given all the fuss they've made about now requiring a £145.50 TV license"

            Got OAP parents, granny, etc? They are EACH entitled to a free TV license at their "primary place of residence" - which is wherever they declare it to be. So just get one of your parents to register a license at your house...

  3. Mage Silver badge
    Pirate

    FTA / State PSBs etc

    "Freebies such as TV catch-up or radio broadcasters won't yet be obliged to make their services portable"

    Why?

    Anyway, it will remove one driving factor for piracy and even if "abused" by someone in France taking out a Croatian sub, it can't be a bit part of market. The rights issue is mostly part of USA Corp's "divide and conquer" approach to Europe. Imagine the outcry if they treated USA states and cities the same way? I can't see the rights holders losing much money, any losses are out of their excessive greed as ultimately subscription services are a rip off. Note that Netflix's prices are probably predatory to build market share at expense of established pay TV.

    1. chriswakey

      Re: FTA / State PSBs etc

      "Imagine the outcry if they treated USA states and cities the same way?"

      If baseball fans in America subscribe to MLB.TV, they generally can't watch their local team, thanks to the big TV providers having deals in place.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_League_Baseball_blackout_policy

      It's shite for them, but luckily for me, I'm in the UK where the blackout restrictions don't apply.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: FTA / State PSBs etc

      "Why?"

      If you have any contract with a freebie supplier it's most likely to be a disclaimer of obligations to supply you at all. With no obligation comes ability to force them to do much, needs more law changes.

      The BBC will be caught though for licence payers, though I expect they'll delay for 2 years and wait for brexit to save them.

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: FTA / State PSBs etc

      Because there isn't a subscription model to access the BBC iPlayer or other catch up services. They use Geo-blocking and a warning that you must have a TV licence.

      If you live in Italy and it wasn't geo-blocked, you can't buy a TV licence and you also can't be prosecuted for watching it.

      Other TV channels are paid by advertising which is all regional.

      1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

        Re: FTA / State PSBs etc

        "If you live in Italy and it wasn't geo-blocked, you can't buy a TV licence and you also can't be prosecuted for watching it."

        I think the point is that if you pay for a streaming service then you have the right to watch it even while travelling around other EU countries. Since the BBC are now pushing the "iPlayer requires a TV licence" then you are paying for it so they need to come up with a way whereby a licence payer can still use it wherever they happen to be in the EU.

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Too little too late

    IPlayer repeats the rubbish on BBC. Anything from elsewhere should torrented because hotel wifi in Europe sucks. Actually most non domestic internet in Europe sucks. To be honest the whole of Europe and the UK is fiddling while rome burns. 2018 ... Oh ok. By then streaming services will all offer offline and the law becomes pointless. Yay for the slow wheels of progress we left.... Good riddance to dealing with things in 10 years... Eu roaming for example. Yawn

    1. AndyS

      Re: Too little too late

      Moan moan moan.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Too little too late

        Moan, moan, moan, thats all people do these days.

        Especially you old people.

        If all youre going to do is sit around and moan, they should take your teeth away!

    2. fruitoftheloon
      WTF?

      @jermey 3: Re: Too little too late

      Jeremy,

      really, you believe the drivel you just spouted???

      Ironically here [in the middle of Devon] our little village has 50/100 BT fibre, which isn't too shabby...

      I bet your parties are a riot!

      Cheers,

      Jay.

  5. Patrick R
    WTF?

    As the EU statement notes, “when a French consumer subscribes to..."

    The original very important problem (VIP) will have been "when an EU civil servant subscribes to blah blah blah in Brussels and is sent abroad for a mission..."

  6. Haku

    Wonderful news!

    That means when I go to Europe from the UK I'll be able to...........bollocks!

    1. Tom 38 Silver badge

      Re: Wonderful news!

      And we can use our feel at home EU roaming on our mobiles to.... double bollocks!

    2. Voland's right hand Silver badge

      Re: Wonderful news!

      Europe also != Eu.

      It will be interesting if Geoblocking will be disabled on the Canaries, channel islands and a few other interesting places. I somehow doubt it.

  7. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Personally I would rather they didn't do this because I would rather be geolocked to my physical (or VPN) location so I can use other services that would not usually be available to me. e.g. Netflix.

  8. DougS Silver badge

    This could backfire on them

    If a copyright holder wants to geolock so discriminatory pricing can be used where certain countries pay more (either because they are richer, or because they are more interested in the content) but providers aren't allowed to do this, what do you think will happen?

    Do you really think copyright holders will charge the lower price everywhere? Of course not, they'll charge the higher price everywhere. Since that might hurt their bottom line, if they lose income in the formerly lower priced countries, they might even raise that higher price in hopes of making up for that lost income.

    1. Charlie Clark Silver badge
      FAIL

      Re: This could backfire on them

      This is nonsense. Why should the price for a product in one country in a single market differ from that in another country in the same single market, purely because of copyright? The geo-blocking has to go because it is in breach of the single market, pure and simple. Geo-blocking is discriminatory and removes opportunities for arbitrage. Well, except that with digital products, you essentially have new forms of arbitrage such as VPNs and torrents.

      Copyright holders have for years flooded new markets with lower prices to drive out local productions only to raise prices once they have dominated the market. One side-effect of this has been to fuel the black market in places like China and Russia.

      1. DougS Silver badge

        Re: This could backfire on them

        Which is my point. You remove the ability for discriminatory pricing, and they'll charge the high prices everywhere. You're not going to win by enforcing this. Better to let them do it, and defeat it via VPNs.

  9. shrdlu
    Unhappy

    That's the BBC buggered then

    Without the geoblock won't be able to sell its programmes across Europe. The TV license funding model will have to be replaced by either advertising or pay-to-view.

    1. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge

      Re: That's the BBC buggered then

      You haven't read the document, have you?

      It's pretty clear that the idea is that someone who is normally resident in one Member State, and temporarily travels to another Member State, will still be allowed to stream anything they signed up to at home. That's all.

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2020