back to article Crumbs. Exceedingly good cakes, meat dressing price hike in wake of the Brexit

Life is about to get more expensive for anyone in Britain that favours a French Fancy, an Angel Slice or indeed any other “exceedingly good” cake from a certain baker. The sad (for some) news reaches El Reg that Premier Foods, the parent of Mr Kipling, is poised to hike prices to retailers. “The situation on pricing differs …

  1. James 51 Silver badge

    Exports are up for the moment but when hedging runs out a weak pound will drive up the costs of imported materials and energy. We don't have vast natural resources to rely on to fuel that manufacturing boom. It might benefit exports over all but it won't be painless by any means.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      The biggest cost to most businesses is their employees, not the cost of raw materials. This is especially true of our service exports. What you'll find is that foreign owned firms in the UK need to increase their prices to maintain the same profits in foreign currency, this puts UK owned firms in a far more competitive position than foreign owned firms as they don't have to maintain the constant currency equivalent of profits. In no way does a 10% fall in sterling equate to a 10% rise in a UK manufactured finished product price increase, sheer profiteering using Brexit as an excuse. But hey that's business, isn't it great ?

      Note Japanese company Nissin owns a 17% stake in Premier foods, who make Mr Kipling's cakes.

      1. streaky Silver badge

        Rates of inflation are a myth in the real world. Basket prices used to measure don't necessarily match the cost of things we're actually buying and have no relation to volumes people are buying at.

        If the rate is 5% it doesn't automatically mean people are having to spend 5% more to get the same items - because there isn't much stopping people switching brands and yes that does drive the importers nuts; but it should. Not that there's a better way of measuring price increases at a macro level. Well we probably could with supermarket data but only supermarkets have that...

        1. tiggity Silver badge

          Indeed. +1ed

          The inflation rates rarely seem to relate to increases in my usual shopping / services / utility / travel expenses.

          Usually when inflation is quoted at X I find my outgoings have increased by Y (where Y > X)

          Maybe I'm just totally atypical compared to the weighted basket of goods, maybe it's due to some of the many flaws in the methods used to calculate inflation (e.g. RPI all about cost change in weighted basket of goods, not about cost to maintain your standard of living - the "basket" is typically a poor estimate of an individuals unique cost of living). Classic example is rented accommodation with limited availability, people I know who rent have had (significantly) above inflation rent increases for years, and as rent is by far their main outgoing they experience a cost of living rise way higher than headline inflation

      2. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

        "The biggest cost to most businesses is their employees, not the cost of raw materials."

        So either the employees absorb the effect of rising cost of imports on their purchases or they get paid more. Either that biggest cost increases or employees subsidise their employer. Never mind, they're getting back control.

    2. Dr Stephen Jones

      Exports are imported stuff with value added.

      With a lower exchange rate you get a bit of inflation and an export boom. Rival countries hate it, of course. They weren't called "Dirty Devaluations" for nothing!

    3. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

      "Exports are up for the moment"

      And yet...https://www.ft.com/content/2ffab0dc-d7dd-11e6-944b-e7eb37a6aa8e

  2. ukgnome Silver badge

    Well done Brexit!

    Now I can't afford a french fancy because of immigration or summink!

    1. Steve Davies 3 Silver badge

      Re: Well done Brexit!

      Don't you mean a 'French Tart'

      Oh-la-la....

      1. ukgnome Silver badge

        @Steve davies 3

        no - frency fancy - it's one of the kippling range....dear lord - why don't you know your cakes.

        The joke doesn't work if I have to first explain that the fancy is a kippling staple.

        This is so typical of brexit - the marmite of all online comments.

    2. Old Tom

      Re: Well done Brexit!

      They're over-sweet shite anyway.

  3. Hollerithevo Silver badge

    My toothpaste

    My favorite toothpaste stayed the same price but went down to 75ml instead of 100ml. I Blame Brexit.

    1. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge

      Re: My toothpaste

      It's all right, after Brexit it'll be back to 3oz

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: My toothpaste

        It's all right, after Brexit it'll be back to 3oz

        I *so* need more upvotes..

        That now stands as my current favourite comment/riposte of the week :)

      2. James 51 Silver badge
        Trollface

        Re: My toothpaste

        The UK has offically been metric since before I was born and the goverment has been pushing for it before we were members of the EEC. We really need to consign that completely illogical system to history. If we start exporting stuff we're going to need to use units of measurement everyone can understand. Not to mention they are a nightmare to teach to children.

        1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge
          Joke

          Re: My toothpaste

          "The UK has offically been metric since before I was born"

          Even the inventors of the metric system can't be arsed to create their own decimal numbering system!

          10, 20, 30 , 40 , 50, 60, 60+10, 4x20, 4x20+10, I mean WTF is that about?

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: My toothpaste

            Yes, I don't care ♊︎ cents for that :)

            (hope that comes out right)

          2. James 51 Silver badge

            Re: My toothpaste

            Other French speaking countries do have a 70, 80 and 90.

            1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

              Re: My toothpaste

              "Other French speaking countries do have a 70, 80 and 90."

              I guess that means those countries don't have a Académie française then?

            2. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Re: My toothpaste

              Other French speaking countries do have a 70, 80 and 90.

              Some have 70, 4x20, 90

        2. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

          Re: My toothpaste

          "We really need to consign that completely illogical system to history."

          Along with metric. Do things right. Binary would be a bit cumbersome but octal or hex would be fine. The evolutionary chance that gave us 5 digits on each hand is a pretty dumb basis for a numbering system.

        3. disgustedoftunbridgewells Silver badge

          Re: My toothpaste

          Does international trade hinge on whether I can buy a quarter of a pound of bonbons from my local newsagent?

          I got a very funny look a couple of years ago from a young shop assistant when I asked for a quarter of sweets. Did these people not have grandparents?

  4. Alister Silver badge

    And look what they did to the Toblerone!

    Half the chocolate for the same price!

    1. Craig McGill 1

      But it is easier to break the mountains off now as the gap is bigger...

      1. Richard 12 Silver badge

        Plus you cab use it to park your bike!

        Chocolate Oranges also got significantly smaller as well.

        1. tiggity Silver badge

          Chocolate tangerine?

      2. ukgnome Silver badge

        @Craig McGill 1

        No Craig - it isn't.

        Doesn't anybody understand how the toblerone fulcrum maneuver.

  5. Tezfair

    it's easy to resolve...

    get out of EU asap

    cut fuel duty as oil in any form is the root of just about everything in modern life

    cut VAT back to 15 or 17.5%

    it's the taxes that's killing us, cut that back encourages growth, thus manufacturing gets healthy. Gov wins, we win

    It's only because the gov wants to clear it's debts that we are all suffering.

    1. Paul Crawford Silver badge

      Re: it's easy to resolve...

      cut fuel duty as oil in any form is the root of just about everything in modern life

      So much less tax for like paying the NHS and pensions, etc?

      1. Cynic_999 Silver badge

        Re: it's easy to resolve...

        "

        So much less tax for like paying the NHS and pensions, etc?

        "

        Or we could keep those things the same and instead cut back on illegal wars, vanity projects such as millennium domes, excessive pay rises for civil servants and unnecessary HS railways. (Though a few inflated pensions of ex-government employees could be reduced a tad with no ill effect). Maybe we could even increase the price of food & booze for MPs to make it the same as the plebs have to pay. Given the readership, I'd better not suggest stopping the practice of spending £billions of our taxes on various computer projects than never had a hope of working.

        1. Fruit and Nutcase Silver badge

          Re: it's easy to resolve...

          @Cynic_999

          Given the readership, I'd better not suggest stopping the practice of spending £billions of our taxes on various computer projects than never had a hope of working

          Somehow I think the readership do take issue with overspend and waste especially when it is our taxes. The money usually goes to line the pockets of the usual suspects and serial offenders and the government of the day never seems to learn. In fact, the larger the waste, the more likely you are to be given even more money to waste next time

        2. Paul Crawford Silver badge

          Re: @ Cynic_999

          So here is your politician's choice when faced with a tax shortcoming:

          1) "Or we could keep those things the same and instead cut back on illegal wars, vanity projects such as millennium domes, excessive pay rises for civil servants and unnecessary HS railways"

          2) Cut back on NHS and public pensions?

          What do you really expect them to do?

        3. streaky Silver badge
          Mushroom

          Re: it's easy to resolve...

          instead cut back on illegal wars

          I get that people think this stuff is funny but our illegal wars are actually a large portion of UK GDP- both in terms of keeping people directly employed and being able to produce stuff that can be exported. World peace would cause world depression - and tech advancement would grind to a halt fwiw.

          1. Flocke Kroes Silver badge

            Re: it's easy to resolve...

            "Being able to produce stuff that can be exported". So we are able to produce stuff, but don't, and it could be exported but we don't.

            Imagine instead of buying bombs and bullets we buy are soldiers beer, and instead of fighting wars, our soldiers have parties. Still got manufacturing and employment for our GDP, but we make fewer enemies. I have confidence in our soldiers, but I am sure even they cannot drink our entire arms budget. Send the surplus beer to our enemies, and perhaps we will have more friends.

            "tech advancement would grind to a halt". ROTFLAO.

        4. James 51 Silver badge
          Headmaster

          Re: it's easy to resolve...

          Assuming you haven't just gotten out of an asylum it's been a long time since doctors, nurses, teachers etc etc got anything above a 1% rise in pay.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: it's easy to resolve...

        "So much less tax for like paying the NHS and pensions, etc?"

        You pay something out of your wages called 'National Insurance' which are supposed to fund those...

        ...or not, if you happen to be one of that special breed of "IT Contractor" who think that National Insurance is for other people.

        <nineties_flashback/>

        1. Paul Crawford Silver badge

          Re: @AC

          For 2017 NI income is £127 billion (apparently http://www.ukpublicrevenue.co.uk/breakdown)

          Expenditure is Public Pensions = £157 billion and National Health Care = £143 billion

          So if you thought that NI alone covered it, and not a significant chunk of general taxation, you are in for a rude surprise.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: @AC

            thank you for posting the publicrevenue link - really interesting.

          2. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: @AC

            "So if you thought that NI alone covered it"

            Oh come on,we all know that NIC hasn't been significantly increased in, well, forever - unlike the escalating cost of the NHS services and pensions which as you rightly point out now dwarfs NIC receipts.

            The point remains that NIC comes from personal income taxation and is supposed to contribute to these public services - and in the '90s especially, large numbers of so-called contractors arranged their company finances so as to pay minimal PAYE and often no NIC at all.

            I'm assuming the numerous downvoters were NIC-dodgers. Well thanks guys for IR35 which was the inevitable result of that behaviour. Well done.

        2. Rich 11 Silver badge

          Re: it's easy to resolve...

          You pay something out of your wages called 'National Insurance' which are supposed to fund those...

          Hypothecation doesn't happen. Unsurprisingly, I suppose, since it would leave the chancellor little room for maneouvre in most budgets.

        3. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

          Re: it's easy to resolve...

          You pay something out of your wages called 'National Insurance' which are supposed to fund those...

          "Supposed" is the operative word there. NI has been part of general taxation for many years.

          The Treasury really, immensely, tremendously hates with a vengeance the very idea specific taxes going to specific expenditure as it wouldn't be able to get its claws on them. It invented an ugly word to describe them: "hypothecated". Would you want to pay something as nasty-sounding as a hypothecated tax? Of course if you knew that NI went to the NHS, pensions etc. or Vehicle Excise Duty under its old name of Road Fund was spent on roads you'd think it was a good idea.

          Ideally NI would go direct to the relevant spending departments and VED would go direct to the DoT & Highways Agency and even a contribution to the NHS to cover the costs of treating RTA injuries. That would force governments to be a bit more upfront about general taxation levels.

          And a final point about NI. I take it you pay NI as part of PAYE. Do you realise that you only pay employee's NI? Freelancers pay both employee's and employer's contributions. Maybe you didn't know that.

    2. Vittal Aithal
      Flame

      Re: it's easy to resolve...

      "cut fuel duty as oil in any form is the root of just about everything in modern life"

      Including all evil?

      1. ThomH Silver badge

        Re: it's easy to resolve...

        Anybody? Anybody? Something-d-o-o economics. Anybody?

    3. TVU Silver badge

      Re: it's easy to resolve...

      " it's easy to resolve...

      get out of EU asap"

      *sigh* When will this spate of Brexit hoodoo economics ever end? Economic isolation and separation from the single market area will result in service and manufacturing businesses relocating within the single market area, more unemployment and economic stagnation and recession.

      Furthermore, there is this grand delusion that's exhibited by Brexit supporters that all foreign investors will opt for investing in a small market of 64 million people over investing in a much larger unified market of well over 400 million people. That is just not going to happen.

      Yes, there will be beneficiaries from a hard Brexit but they will be Paris, Frankfurt and the Republic of Ireland and certainly not British workers.

      1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

        Re: it's easy to resolve...

        "When will this spate of Brexit hoodoo economics ever end?"

        When reality catches up with it. By then it will be far too late.

        1. the Jim bloke Silver badge

          Re: When will this spate of Brexit hoodoo economics ever end?

          when someone comes up with something even sillier

          FTFY

          I think Douglas Adams had a preface to one of the Hitchhiker books that would be relevant.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: it's easy to resolve...

        Furthermore, there is this grand delusion that's exhibited by Brexit supporters that all foreign investors will opt for investing in a small market of 64 million people over investing in a much larger unified market of well over 400 million people. That is just not going to happen.

        No, they'll continue to invest in the total market of 464million. Why would they do otherwise if they can make money with it?

        Yes, there will be beneficiaries from a hard Brexit but they will be Paris, Frankfurt and the Republic of Ireland and certainly not British workers.

        That's what the EU want to see, of course, to punish the UK for daring to leave their cosy little club, but it won't be like that (unless the remoaners continue to work against exit just for spite). There's too much money at stake, and too many people who aren't daft enough to pour good money after bad into failing eurozone regions like Paris.

    4. Schultz
      Facepalm

      "It's only because the gov wants to clear it's debts that we are all suffering."

      I hate to break it to you, but those are really your debts, taken on by your government in your name. (I assume that you interact with said government by voting, paying taxes, receiving benefits, using public infrastructure, ...)

    5. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

      Re: it's easy to resolve...

      It's only because the gov wants needs to clear it's debts that we are all suffering.

      FTFY or nearly. Damn difficult to strike through an apostrophe.

  6. Lars Silver badge
    Happy

    Oh dear

    Why this topic, when the Sterling goes down something else goes up, good for some and not good for others. I live in a country who got fed up with the ten-yearly devaluation and joined the Euro hoping for a less easy and more intelligent solution to dealing with the reality. Could it be, that after all, the UK has had to wake up to the reality of a country who, living in the past, and totally unaware of how fast the country has gone towards a "I wash your feet, and you cut my hair" economy. If so, welcome to the reality, dear Brits, the silver lining of Brexit perhaps.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Oh dear, Lars

      I live in a country who got fed up with the ten-yearly devaluation and joined the Euro hoping for a less easy and more intelligent solution to dealing with the reality.

      Bwahahahahaa! Look how that's panned out - vast unemployment in southern Europe, an incipient Italian banking crisis, the issue of Greek (Spanish, Portugese, French) bad debt wholly unresolved, meanwhile Germany exports fancy cars at discounted intra-EU exchange rates.

      The UK is a basket case economy, I'll give you that. But I rather be my own basket case, than wrapped up in the incestuous, bungled mess of the Euro. Within the Euro, there's only two options - repudiate certain high value billion-to-trillion value debts, or Germany pay them all off. Either is a bad outcome, but that's what Europe is stalling on. Good luck, because you're going to need it even more than our little island is.

      1. Brewster's Angle Grinder Silver badge

        Re: Oh dear, Lars

        @Ledswinger Greece aside, I don't think either of your options need happen. If there are no massive external shocks or internal revolts, then internal devaluation will produce a continent where every country is as efficient as Germany, with a commensurate rise in the euro. For Germany, it would be a slow and painfree slide into mediocrity; I mean, imagine if the Italians could produce cars every bit as well engineered as German ones.

        1. Schultz

          "internal devaluation will produce a continent where every country is as efficient as Germany"

          Just like during the golden age before the EU integration? As I remember it, a lot of countries struggled to compete economically with Germany before the EU economic integration. Why should the future look very different?

        2. SundogUK

          Re: Oh dear, Lars

          The Germans will never let this happen.

    2. Brewster's Angle Grinder Silver badge

      Re: Oh dear

      I'm a remainer. But the euro is a whole different kettle of piranha.

      When your currency can't go down, wages end up cut to the bedrock, unemployment increases and companies (and individuals) incur massive debt (which probably end up bailed out by the government leading to cuts in public services). Such "internal devaluation" is far, far worse than the 5% inflation we might get.

      With a name like Lars, you're probably from a country whose currency should have risen. So I'm sure its very nice for you; the UK would have been in the same position, if we'd joined. It's too soon to know whether joining would have been a stroke of Machiavellian genius or whether we've avoided an almighty day of reckoning. Given what the Greek's have accepted so far it may be joing would have been cost free. But part of the reason Brexit is happening is because people have blamed the EU for the crisis in the eurozone periphery.

    3. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

      Re: Oh dear

      "I live in a country who got fed up with the ten-yearly devaluation and joined the Euro hoping for a less easy and more intelligent solution to dealing with the reality."

      I suspect one reason we kept out of the Euro was the realisation that it seemed impossible to set an economic policy that worked out right for all parts of the UK let alone a whole continent.

      Brown thought he had a winner to end boom and bust: set interest rates at a level depending on inflation excluding housing inflation and at a time when a lot of manufacturing was being outsourced to cheap labour countries. It was going really well until the consequent humongous credit boom collided with reality.

  7. Mr Dogshit
    Joke

    Yes, but it's worth it to regain our sovereignty.

    1. ThomH Silver badge

      Yeah! The metric martyrs didn't give their lives for nothing!

    2. Richard 12 Silver badge

      Yes, but it's worth it to regain our sovereignty create Lady High Emperor May.

      Fixed it for you.

      She doesn't want Parliamentary sovereignty. Her representative even argued that she has unlimited power to decide our future in the Supreme Court.

  8. Aristotles slow and dimwitted horse Silver badge

    I'm sure...

    I'm sure that an extra 5p or so on top of my beloved 6 pack of Bakewell tarts isn't going to break the bank. Alternatively if I was really moved to do so I'd just reprioritise or do away with some of the other superflouous stuff so the impact of these cost rises are of minimal impact.

    No fuss. No dramas.

    1. Warm Braw Silver badge

      Re: I'm sure...

      The average family spends around £3000 per year on food. You may not really notice if that bill goes up by 5%, but the economy will notice the loss of all the £150s people like you would otherwise have spent on something else.

      EDIT: Also, as a good proportion of food is zero-rated for VAT purposes, the diversion of more discretionary spending into food purchases also reduces tax revenues...

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: I'm sure...

        but the economy will notice the loss of all the £150s people like you would otherwise have spent on something else.

        True, but the devaluation of Sterling is long overdue. The FX rate justified on membership of the EU was an unsupportable one, because the macro economics were quite clear. So blaming Brexit for an entirely justified and long overdue fall in our exchange rate is rather pointless. And the EU still have to come to terms with the flaws in their own collective economy.

    2. Cynic_999 Silver badge

      Re: I'm sure...

      Sure, anything taken in isolation is trivial. You give up an unnecessary luxury here, pay a bit extra there - no single item is worth shouting about. Then one day you wake up to the fact that you are paying a lot more for a crappier standard of living compared to this time 2 or 3 years ago.

      Just like I'm sure it would be no problem for you to give a syringe of your blood to that nice nurse. It would be silly to make a fuss even if you don't think that taking the sample is going to do any good. But after 100 nurses have demanded the same before lunch, you might be feeling decidedly light-headed ...

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: I'm sure...

      > I'm sure that an extra 5p or so on top of my beloved 6 pack of Bakewell tarts isn't going to break the bank.

      Or you could even buy *real* bakewall tarts from a local baker or farmer's market, rather than mass-produced pap where they shave off every fraction of a penny that they can.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: I'm sure...

        Only Bakewell Tarts are the ones serving Bakewell Pudding, fcuk Mr Kipling!

        I think 5p on a packet of crap pies is more than fair exchange for Deutsche Bank's debt thank you ;-) roll on Brexit

  9. Dr Stephen Jones

    Clickbait

    So basically:

    * IT wages will go up

    * Manufacturing exports will increase

    * We rebalance the economy away from The City - maybe

    And yet all the author can do is whinge about the possibility that angel slices might get more expensive. Might being the operative word, as the competitive retail market has absorbed most of the wholesale price rises so far.

    No tech angle here, just clickbait for Remoaners.

    1. Rich 11 Silver badge

      Re: Clickbait

      I notice you carefully avoided all consideration of inflation, as though it and the price of cake are utterly unrelated.

    2. Richard 12 Silver badge

      Re: Clickbait

      * Inflation is going up

      * Well-paid jobs will be lost

      * Underemployment will increase

      * Companies will close (esp. importers)

      * Cost of Government borrowing rises

      * Tax revenue will fall.

      Note the London is roughly 30% of all the UK tax revenue. Close down "The City" and total UK tax revenue falls by 10-20%.

      You think "X" is underfunded now? Try cutting 10% of the budget.

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Clickbait

      The chances that the UK Government will roll back 30 years worth of policies promoting London and the South East as the be all and end all of world are rather remote I feel.

      The only thing that will fix this bloody country is a rapid expansion of housing and moving vast chunks of capital to the North, Wales and Cornwall to encourage business to go there.

      1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

        Re: Clickbait

        "The chances that the UK Government will roll back 30 years worth of policies promoting London and the South East as the be all and end all of world are rather remote I feel."

        I think you're confusing two issues. Increasing concentration of employment in large cities is unsustainable - far too much time and energy is wasted on commuting ever-increasing distances.

        On the other hand "the city", be it in one place or many, accounts for a large proportion of the national income and we'll be very much worse off without it. Especially if May wants to use some of that income as state aid to keep motor manufacturing from migrating to a bigger home market.

  10. Kyorin

    If people actually thought they would be financially worse off, they may have voted differently, but it's done now, most people will very likely be worse off.

    I think any deal the government manages to negotiate should be put to the public at the end of this two year period. If the deal is crap, then why continue down the path to ruin? Of course, there a chance we may get a good deal, but whichever way it goes, at the end of the two years of negotiating, the question should be put to the public again once the terms are known.

    1. Rich 11 Silver badge

      I think you might be a little more optimistic than I am that such a vote wouldn't once more be awash in a flood of emotive argument and outright lies, rather than be one of considered discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the single market, the customs union and the four freedoms.

      1. SeanC4S

        Emotional blinding admixed with elements of callous disregard.

        I think the situation in the English speaking countries is interesting. I wonder how it will turn out for them? Hopefully some form of self correction will occur and there won't be a geopolitical tsunami. Unfortunately I live on the coastline and would certainly end up swimming with the fishes.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        the advantages and disadvantages of the single market, the customs union and the four freedoms

        It's too late to worry about them. They were all a key part of the largely successful common market.

        The the politicians added political and financial union to the mix to create their european empire, and fucked the whole thing up.

        If we could get back to just the single market & the customs union we'd all be better off but, since the egotistic bozos in Brussels won't admit they're wrong, it looks like the only option is to smash the whole thing, and build a new one that might get it right. Wasteful, but so are most things where politicians are involved.

  11. SeanC4S

    The cakes don't cost anything to make. You are paying for executives and middle class managers to scratch each others backs. The international commodity price of these things is within a rounding error of zero. But that is how it is in a neoliberal /neoconservative society.

    60% of the population have a better quality of life than a millionaire in the 1960's or 1970's would have had. The other 40% don't exist. They've been swept under the carpet, for none to see.

    1. Richard 12 Silver badge
      WTF?

      Lots of people put those cakes on supermarket shelves.

      Lots of people work in the warehousing and lorries that get the cakes from the factory to the supermarket.

      Lots of people work in the factories making cakes.

      Lots of people work in the factories making ingredients and packaging for those cakes.

      Lots of people work in the farms, forests etc growing and harvesting the raw materials for those cakes.

      Lots of people work in the ports loading and unloading the ships of materials for those cakes.

      Lots of people work in the warehousing, ships and lorries storing and transporting the materials for those cakes.

      Lots of other people do jobs that are necessary for those cakes to end up in my kitchen, yet I don't even realise those jobs exist.

      Do you really think that none of those people are worthy of a decent wage?

      Think very carefully before you answer.

    2. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

      "The cakes don't cost anything to make."

      Same applies to Walkers Crisps. WTF are they importing that the value of Sterling affects enough to impose a price rise? Are the flavouring chemicals imported? Are they expensive? Surely they don't import spuds!

      1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

        "Same applies to Walkers Crisps. ... Surely they don't import spuds!"

        No, but they and the farmers producing the spuds buy the energy to fertilise, harvest and transport the spuds, fry them, make the packaging and distribute them at dollar denominated prices. They're realistic costs although there might be an excuse to increase margins there, which will probably be taken up in the longer run with wage rises when the employees get hit with all the other price rises consequent on more expensive imports.

  12. tony2heads
    Pirate

    Have a Brexit

    Your new diet alternative to full-fat EU!

    Icon: this guy has been eating only Brexit foods!

  13. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    stir and stoke

    This is a perfect story for both sides of the referendum to keep beating on about the same nonsense that led to their vote.

    England may or may not do alright with or without europe but the EU is far from healthy and the number of trade deals going on outside of your quaint Euro-bubble is staggering.

    I've watched years of austerity from the boom land of Asia and its pathetic how the infighting is distracting everyone from the fact, England and the EU are not the big desirable markets they were... sure they are worth chasing, but southern asia is mostly middle class now... replacing the people in Europe buying toasters from China.

    Keep fighting and throwing around terms like "hard" and "soft" brexit, whatever you are doing, get on with it. No one else in the world is waiting for you.

    1. astrax

      Re: stir and stoke

      This is probably one of the most balanced perspectives I've seen regarding the referendum. A lot of people are basing their projections on the current state of the global economy; in reality, five years from now the new power-house economies will be the likes of Brazil and India. It is clear that we are leaving the EU, and like AC said previously, the UK should focus on getting the EU trading agreements completed as quickly as possible. When these global economic shifts occur, we want to be riding the crest of the wave, not drowning under it.

    2. John Brown (no body) Silver badge
      Joke

      Re: stir and stoke

      "England may or may not do alright with or without europe"

      Are you presuming that the UK will fully break up or just one of the colonials who think the other countries of the UK are Scotlandshire, Irelandshire and whatever that other place with the sheep is called that Prince Charles rules.

    3. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

      Re: stir and stoke

      "England may or may not do alright"

      Do you have similar predictions for Wales, Scotland & N. Ireland? - although we might be able to leave Scotland out of it after Indyref 2.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: stir and stoke

        Do you have similar predictions for Wales, Scotland & N. Ireland?

        I predict that they're all far too small to have any economic weight whatsoever. Losing Whisky, male voice choirs and Game of Thrones isn't going to make the chancellor lose sleep.

  14. Roj Blake Silver badge

    £350M

    Still, at least we have that extra £350M a week to look forward to, eh Boris?

  15. David Gosnell

    Overpriced anyway

    We only ever buy Mr Kipling things when they're on special offer, and I doubt those will change much. Took me years even to risk doing that, having spent some time working in one of their factories.

  16. Jonathan Richards 1
    WTF?

    Mathematical inexactitude

    > rises around the mid-single digit mark

    That's so elliptical as to be a waste of oxygen to enunciate. If you were to conclude that Premier Foods might add somewhere between four and six pounds sterling to the price of everything, it wouldn't be contradictory.

    1. Richard 12 Silver badge

      Re: Mathematical inexactitude

      They mean 5%

      1. Loyal Commenter Silver badge

        Re: Mathematical inexactitude

        They mean 5%

        No, they want you to think it's 5%, but they mean 7-8%, possibly 9%

    2. Chris Hunt

      Re: Mathematical inexactitude

      On average we are considering rises around the mid-single digit mark

      Allow me to raise a single mid-digit in response to such an abuse of language.

  17. Fihart

    Nothing to see (or eat) here...

    A glance at a shot of Premier Foods' product line reassured me that any price increases would not affect me one jot. To take your example of Mr. Kipling -- he does make exceedingly over-sweet cakes.

    I once read that many of the extra ingredients listed in factory-made cakes were there to prevent the mixture sticking to the machinery and the rest were there to prolong shelf-life.

  18. John Sturdy

    Since their pay to stay, Premier Foods have been a company I'd be delighted to see go under, in the hope that whoever moves into their niche will be an improvement. I'm not going to notice their price hikes, because I've not bought from them since then.

  19. earl grey Silver badge
    Trollface

    ₤ = $

    Getting there is half the fun. I want my metric ₤.

    /s

    As far as italy making autos as good as german...i'm sure they can figure a way to cheat on their diesels too. /s

  20. Andy 30

    Stop repressing me

    This is an autonomous collective

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