back to article Lenovo: If you value your server, block Microsoft's November security update

Lenovo server admins should disable Windows Update and apply a UEFI fix to avoid Microsoft’s November security patches freezing their systems. The world’s third-largest server-maker advised the step after revealing that 19 configurations of its x M5 and M6 rack, as well as its x6 systems are susceptible. Lenovo’s machines are …

  1. Version 1.0 Silver badge
    Linux

    Go ahead

    This must be some new definition of "Secure boot" that I was previously unaware of - it's time to upgrade to Linux anyway.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Go ahead

      No problem. Can you let everyone know the Linux equivalent of Lync.

      You know the one that does IM, Video,Ppresence, whiteboarding, all with office suite and calendaring?

      And that s just one example.

      Linux is good, but it can't do everything.

      1. Lee D Silver badge

        Re: Go ahead

        Sure, what's the Windows equivalent to systemd?

        Sound stupid? That's because it is.

        Horses for courses, and I've not worked in a workplace that uses Lync and I've been doing IT and network management for 20 years.

        In fact, even Exchange is rare in some industries, even in Windows-only environments.

        Hedging your bets on a product that only works on Windows is a dumb business decision, even if "everyone else does it". We found that out in the 90's but some of us never learn.

        And with virtualisation, it really doesn't matter what OS the server runs any more, so long as the individual VM's (which is where the Lync Server would sit) have the right OS.

        In this case, what we're questioning is why you'd run a Windows hypervisor, not a Windows server serving a Windows-only application that you've decided to standardise on. Plenty of places survive just fine without ever having had, used, or afforded Lync.

        Not that that makes Linux any better or worse, to be honest. But at least it's not Mac.

        (P.S. 30+ virtual servers, about 60% Windows, 30% Linux).

        With cloud services, virtualisation and modern systems, you're an idiot to put all your eggs in one basket. For instance, here, if you had all Lenovo servers with all Windows Server and had - as recommended - auto-update turned on, you would have taken all EVERYTHING in one fell swoop. That's just stupid.

        And how long, honestly, before Lync / Skype is "just another cloud-service"? Not long, it's already here:

        https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/cloud/gg671923.aspx

        1. MickySlice

          Re: Go ahead

          Without turning this into a contest, 30+ servers aren't really much to write home about.

          The game changes when running enterprise IT systems when you are dealing with hundreds of servers and thousands of users. For all it's faults, Microsoft has a decent directory system that links very well with a lot of it's other products.

          Now perhaps if a software house wanted to run purely Linux and had the expertise to deploy full Chef/Puppet orchestration then the argument may hold a bit of weight.

          PS. I am not a fan of Hyper-V and much prefer VMWare.

          1. Hans 1 Silver badge

            Re: Go ahead

            >Now perhaps if a software house wanted to run purely Linux and had the expertise to deploy full Chef/Puppet orchestration then the argument may hold a bit of weight.

            You should in any case deploy that, it has many advantages over AD, even for windows-only/windows-mostly shops, and can comfortably be implemented alongside AD.

            UNIX supported LDAP natively a decade before Microsoft, what are you mumbling ? LDAP is quite a widespread protocol. Kerberos is another example, again, was available on UNIX ~20 years before Windows ... just saying.

            AD/GPO suck when it comes to managing non-Windows systems or even non-registry-centric programs on Windows, on the other hand, Samba+OpenLDAP+Chef/puppet kicks ass, for those who cannot leave Windows 100%.

            1. MickySlice

              Re: Go ahead

              That is all very true but the real issue is always the bottom line.

              Let's face it, it's cheaper to hire Windows professionals over Linux AND Windows professionals.

              If I wanted to deploy Chef/Puppet within an enterprise environment then I would want to make sure that it was done correctly and supported by competent engineers. Windows does a lot of this stuff already for a lower TCO.

              I love a bit of UNIX but sometimes you need to be pragmatic when working with limited budgets.

              1. oldcoder

                Re: Go ahead

                Actually, you mean a higher TCO.

                Using Linux/BSD has always been good for limited budgets.

              2. Anonymous Coward
                Anonymous Coward

                Re: Go ahead

                Have you heard the expression "if you pay peanuts then you get monkeys"?

                I have never worked with a unix BSer yet but I met plenty of MS Pros who I could only conclude had either suffer brain damage since certification or had someone else take the test.

                1. Kiwi Silver badge
                  Linux

                  Re: Go ahead

                  either suffer brain damage since certification or had someone else take the test.

                  Or perhaps the writers of the test were the ones who suffered brain damage?

              3. oldcoder

                Re: Go ahead

                You mean "hire dozens of Windows professionals over" two or three "Linux AND Windows professionals".

                One Linux professional can handle many more systems than one Windows professional. The ratios reported are around 50 linux servers to 1 Windows server... But it does vary. Facebook is reported to use 1 engineer for some 1,000,000 users... or 1 engineer per 130 servers (I believe that was for the same engineer).

                But the number varies a lot depending on the environment. For a while I was the Kerberos maintenance (and support) for about 15,000 users scattered across the world using several dozen different computer centers, so I tended to get the admins calling about any problems. If I added up all the servers supported that would be several thousand (between 30 and 100 per center, depending on the center).

                Anywhere security was mandatory ... left windows out. You can't secure that.

        2. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Go ahead

          My point, is saying "upgrade to Linux" is the usual dumb blinkered answer that some people give out as a stock answer, it's a little sad and pathetic.

          As you said horses for courses.

          (About 4000 servers about 64% Windows, 34% Linux and a smattering of custom black boxes running all kinds of random stuff)

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Go ahead

            "My point, is saying "upgrade to Linux" is the usual dumb blinkered answer that some people give out as a stock answer, it's a little sad and pathetic"

            ...and in response, the usual dumb blinkered answer is "Linux is useless because I can randomly think of one application I use that doesn't have a Linux version, even though numerous alternatives exist". The only thing more pathetic than the "Linux does everything" answer is the "Linux doesn't run every Windows application and I don't want to think or put in any effort to migrate" answer

          2. hplasm Silver badge
            Happy

            Re: Go ahead

            "As you said horses for courses."

            Some courses for racehorses, another course for donkeys.

        3. quxinot Silver badge

          Re: Go ahead

          >Horses for courses, and I've not worked in a workplace that uses Lync and I've been doing IT and network management for 20 years.

          While I agree with all of the arguments you make, I have to point out that doing something for a long time != doing it well. For example, the Bush family was in the oval office for how long? I'm sure you can think of other examples--nearly everyone works with at least one.

        4. Gis Bun

          Re: Go ahead

          "....even Exchange is rare in some industries...." And where did you get that information from? Where are the facts?

      2. Voland's right hand Silver badge

        Re: Go ahead

        Can you let everyone know the Linux equivalent of Lync.

        That would have been fine if lync actually worked. Ever since it was renamed Skype for Business its "success rate" is about 30%. That drops to sub<10% if there are people on Mac, VPNs, etc.

        You can get the Skype For Business functionality on Linux using google talk and google apps (if you surrender to the idea of google knowing each and every step you make). It also works properly on a mobile (something Lync stopped doing once it became Skype for Business). IM works. Video works significantly better than Lync, Presence works, whiteboarding and other conference facilities also work and so does calendaring. It has only one massive downside - it pretty much requires VOIP and you need decent data connectivity. Not usable out in the sticks. The upside is that it is significantly more reliable than Skype For Business.

        Alternatively - you get that easily using webex + a decent xmpp server of your choice. It is a bit more hassle and you need to cobble it together for a team. It has the advantage that it works pretty much anywhere and the bandwidth requirements are ~ NIL unless you have an idiot PHB in the team which insists on his mug always being displayed to his subordinates.

        In both cases you also can integrate into that 3rd party systems and apps. Something which you can forget about as far as lync is concerned.

        I have to use all 3 of these on a weekly basis and I would overall rate them: Webex, Hangouts and Skype for Business as a very remote unreliable third.

        1. simpfeld

          Re: Go ahead

          To connect to a Skype for business aka Lynx server on Linux is possible. There is a commercial program called "Sky" formally Wync that works well. Pretty much full functionality, join meetings desktop sharing etc

      3. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Go ahead

        "No problem. Can you let everyone know the Linux equivalent of Lync. Linux is good, but it can't do everything."

        I don't know about Lync, but can you let me know how to stop Windows Servers from needing a reboot every month or from being the biggest target of malware?

        It's hardly surprising that vender's propriety software package inter-operates with vender's other propriety software.

        1. AndrewDu

          Re: Go ahead

          Every month?

          Just looking at the file and SQL servers at my site - both virtualised under Hyper-V - uptime shows 408 days right now. And before you ask, the reboot before that was planned.

          Every month, indeed.

          1. sqlrob

            Re: Go ahead

            So you're admitting to having remote execution and privilege escalation flaws in your file server? Even if they're not accessible from the internet, insiders are the greatest threat.

            Good move.

            1. LDS Silver badge

              Re: Go ahead

              Also, if other devices are compromised somehow, intruders will look for vulnerable machines to expand and gather more information and privileges....

              Pure "uptime" is really a "my dick is bigger than yours" thing - for teenagers sysadmins (and lazy ones). The only thing that is important is you have to match your services needs - including keeping the systems and their data secure. I really don't care if I reboot every n days (including Linux for kernel updates, and some services could need to be restarted anyway to load fixed code...), only I care to perform them when they don't impact services, or impact is minimal and anyway well planned.

        2. DougMac

          Re: Go ahead

          > I don't know about Lync, but can you let me know how to stop Windows Servers from needing a reboot every month or from being the biggest target of malware?

          How can we stop Linux from needing a reboot every two weeks due to kernel issues?

          USN-3147-1: Linux kernel vulnerabilities - 30th November 2016

          USN-3126-1: Linux kernel vulnerabilities - 11th November 2016

          USN-3107-1: Linux kernel vulnerability - 19th October 2016

          USN-3099-1: Linux kernel vulnerabilities - 11th October 2016

          USN-3084-1: Linux kernel vulnerabilities - 19th September 2016

          USN-3072-1: Linux kernel vulnerabilities - 29th August 2016

          USN-3055-1: Linux kernel vulnerabilities - 10th August 2016

          USN-3035-1: Linux kernel vulnerability - 14th July 2016

          Every OS needs patches. You can elect not to patch any system, but standing up Linux as not needing patches and Windows does is pretty absurd.

          1. Gis Bun

            Re: Go ahead

            Maybe they don't think a kernel vulnerability is critical?

          2. kryptylomese

            Re: Go ahead

            Linux does not need to be rebooted, you can live patch the kernel - That is the difference!

            1. Sandtitz Silver badge

              Re: Go ahead @kryptylomese

              "Linux does not need to be rebooted, you can live patch the kernel - That is the difference!"

              How do I do that with my Mint installation? It requires a reboot to activate the latest kernel.

              Please advise.

              1. JW 1

                Re: Go ahead @kryptylomese

                Not tried this but Google says:

                http://blog.zwiegnet.com/linux-server/install-ksplice-on-linux-mint-2/

            2. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Re: you can live patch the kernel

              I thought this season's preferred terminology was "hot patch":

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYRlTISvjww

          3. oldcoder

            Re: Go ahead

            Depends on your distribution... Ksplice allows for replacing the kernel without a reboot...

            There are also other methods of patching a kernel without rebooting...

            You also are not required to reboot - just apply the patches. When you next do a PM/other reason to reboot, then the kernel will be the patched one.

            It is up to the administrator and management do decide when to do a reboot.

            Unless you are on Windows when it is at the will of Microsoft.

            1. Electron Shepherd

              Re: Go ahead

              Unless you are on Windows when it is at the will of Microsoft.

              Only if you're daft enough to configure the server to reboot automatically if required. If you're a bit sensible, it will just sit there saying "Patches installed, please reboot", and if you're really sensible, it will sit there saying "Patches downloaded - ready to install".

              The idea that Windows forces reboots is totally incorrect.

            2. LDS Silver badge

              Re: Go ahead

              Is Ksplice the default? No, it isn't. It *can* be used, and you have to test carefully it won't create more problems than it solves.

              Sure, you're not required to reboot - but until you do, the old kernel is active and any vulnerability in it also. It's a matter of managing risks.

              Nor Windows Server reboots on its own unless you configure it to do so.

          4. waldo kitty
            Boffin

            Re: Go ahead

            How can we stop Linux from needing a reboot every two weeks due to kernel issues?

            there is a reason why firewalls and other security related devices run older vetted kernels... if you are going to run bleeding edge stuff on your servers (and even workstations) you will be cut and have some blood loss at some point...

            but then again, the v4 of the linux kernel has introduced inline patching (or something like that) where the kernel gets the fixes but the machine doesn't have to be rebooted...

            so -1

            Every OS needs patches. You can elect not to patch any system, but standing up Linux as not needing patches and Windows does is pretty absurd.

            but i tend to agree with this statement in general so +1

            that's a balance so your points remain the same ;)

      4. Dan 55 Silver badge

        Re: Go ahead

        Why would you need Lync on a server?

      5. Hans 1 Silver badge

        Re: Go ahead

        >Linux equivalent of Lync.

        >You know the one that does IM, Video,Ppresence, whiteboarding, all with office suite and calendaring?

        BS, Lync is so bad that they replaced it with Teams, which also suffers some of the same issues ... like, messages no appearing ... you get the notification pop up "New message from x", then you go to the conversation with "x", and of course, the message is not there ... yes, a reboot temporarily fixes it, but that does not count, right ?

        Anyway, POL is your friend, if you insist on that crap ....

        1. Gis Bun

          Re: Go ahead

          "...Lync is so bad that they replaced it with Teams...." And where is the official news release from Microsoft saying this? Ya. There isn't any. Nice dreaming.

      6. Paul Woodhouse

        Re: Go ahead

        easy nuff... jabber, cal/carddav, sendmail, dovecot prob. best to use something like Zentyal as your base where most of its already on...

        1. Trixr Bronze badge

          Re: Go ahead

          Try and get that all up and running in a day, complete with robust HA. Exchange just works, for enterprises with more than a few dozen people.

      7. Alistair Silver badge
        Linux

        Re: Go ahead

        I find pidgin(with sipe) works just fine for me. The whiteboarding crap in lync just plain does not work in a properly secured environment. Desktop sharing in lync works, but it really doesn't suit my requirements.

        Other than the fact that having Lync and Outlook365 running on a windows system eventually chews up every last scrap of ram and then some, eventually hanging windows, I don't see an advantage to S4B.

      8. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Go ahead

        Lync! Lync?!!!! You're kidding me, right. It has to be the worst mainstream IM tool I have ever used.

        Your point is definitely valid, but Lync for $deity sake.

      9. jelabarre59 Silver badge

        Re: Go ahead

        No problem. Can you let everyone know the Linux equivalent of Lync.

        You know the one that does IM, Video,Ppresence, whiteboarding, all with office suite and calendaring?

        And that s just one example.

        Linux is good, but it can't do everything.

        But wouldn't NOT running Lync be a feature rather than a shortcoming???

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Go ahead

      I only have experience of using a single Lenovo product - the Thinkpad W541. And I think it's a bag of washing. For it's spec it's slow, expensive and it refuses to boot Ubuntu. Under both Windows and Mint the screen flickers when watching video's and despite an outstanding support case that I registered with the thing over a year ago, no answer. The support for projectors is dire (one or the other, not the two at the same time).

      I guess the same "get it out the door fast" approach to firmware applies to servers as well as their laptops.

    3. Yes Me Silver badge
      Thumb Down

      Re: Go ahead

      > time to upgrade to Linux anyway

      Good luck with trying to dual boot Windows 10 and Linux. I tried for a day to get round UEFI problems (on an HP junker, not a LeNovo) and concluded that whatever Win10 had done to the UEFI meant that none of the recipes and tricks for dual boot installation worked: all I could ever boot was bloody Win10, event though Linux Mint had installed perfectly.

      Solution: blew away Windows completely on that machine. Worked like a charm.

  2. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Does this affect only Lenovo-badged servers

    Or does it affect Lenovo-built ones as well? (who *doesn't* have Lenovo build their servers these days?)

    1. Mr Dogshit

      "who *doesn't* have Lenovo build their servers these days?"

      Er.. Lenovo don't even seem to make their own servers any more. The ones I've taken delivery of recently say "Made for Lenovo" on them, not "Made by".

    2. TeeCee Gold badge
      Facepalm

      Re: Does this affect only Lenovo-badged servers

      Wouldn't be surprised.

      Another well-known Lenovo "feature" is on their Desktop / Laptop range. If you install a new, standalone, licensed MS Office without wiping the machine and reinstalling the OS[1], it fucks the licensing up. Apparently Lenovo have done something naughty to the OEM version of "Get Office". Uninstalling the "Get Office" app doesn't help as they haven't tweaked the uninstall routine to recognise and remove the registry keys they've cocked up...

      So, proven form for playing fast and loose with the MS standards...and not getting away with it(!)

      [1] Ok you can manually edit the registry but, given Lenovo's record, it's safer to nuke the site from orbit.

  3. Andy The Hat Silver badge

    End user ...

    As an end user I don't see this problem. And, kindly, Microsoft automatically install my Win10 updates that will work 100% on the time and will never brick my system, alter its configuration or impact my workflow at all.

    Thankfully, Microsoft have explained that they are infallible, always correct and there'll never be an occasion when they get it wrong and cost me time and money so I'm happy for them to continue.

    1. VinceH

      Re: End user ...

      You forgot to use either the sarcasm or irony icon.

      What do you mean, there isn't one?

    2. Fatman Silver badge
      Joke

      Re: End user ...

      Is that YOU, Loverock Davidson?????

    3. littlejohnny

      Re: my Win10 updates

      Should one interpret the statement as a recognition of Win10 as a _server_ OS?

  4. L'Ecossais

    An OS update that changes your server's firmware?

    From MS16-140:-

    The security update addresses the vulnerability by revoking affected boot policies in the firmware.

    Since when has Microsoft had the authority to change a feature of your HW without prior consultation?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: An OS update that changes your server's firmware?

      Since UEFI became a thing.

      1. W.O.Frobozz

        Re: An OS update that changes your server's firmware?

        It shouldn't have.

    2. LDS Silver badge

      Re: An OS update that changes your server's firmware?

      Windows doesn't affect your hardware. Simply blacklist some UEFI policies which are deemed insecure. Of course the system won't boot if it relies on them.

      1. jelabarre59 Silver badge

        Re: An OS update that changes your server's firmware?

        Windows doesn't affect your hardware. Simply blacklist some UEFI policies which are deemed insecure. Of course the system won't boot if it relies on them.

        But wouldn't that be the ultimate method for making MSWin secure; prevent it from ever booting up?

  5. Anonymous South African Coward Silver badge

    So, who got bitten by this "feature"?

  6. Doc Ock

    UEFI - Unguarded Entrance For Interference

  7. Tubz
    WTF?

    Microsoft still think people will trust them to delivery Windows as a service when it borks good machines and then pass of the problem to Lenovo to fix ?

    1. Bodge99

      MS have previous form with this sort of shite..

      Not quite on the same scale.. but some baytrail tablets have been bricked by MS updating the firmware on the device.. Reboot.. dead tablet.

      The only way to recover the tablet is to reflash the firmware with an external hardware programmer.

      One guy has had MS pay for the repair.

      See http://linxtablet.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=36&t=2253

      1. Kiwi Silver badge
        Linux

        Not quite on the same scale.. but some baytrail tablets have been bricked by MS updating the firmware on the device.. Reboot.. dead tablet.

        While back I saw the same thing on a HP AIO machine. IIRC Win 10 (may've been 8, should search the comments for my post) was updating the firmware as part of the updates, only screwed things up such that the machine would only boot with a small few RAM modules - in that case a 1 or 2G module. Only found it by fluke. Fix was to install 8, then re-flash to the latest HP firmware, then make sure 10 couldn't install on the machine. Took us a couple of events before we understood what was going on.

        This was a user machine, so updates were automatic (no other option) and reboots were forced (no other option, not even to save open files!)

        (quick search - original post is http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/containing/2681764 )

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Microsoft still think people will trust them to delivery Windows as a service when it borks good machines and then pass of the problem to Lenovo to fix ?

      While I may not be a friend to Microsoft, I wouldn't put it past Lenovo to have cocked this one up. I'm sure they aquired a whole bunch of operational procedures from IBM when they bought out the rack server systems.

  8. Anonymous Coward
    Big Brother

    Hmmm...

    MSFT must have been given the go-ahead to remove the PLA's back-door in the UEFI by delivering an NSA payload in the 'update'

  9. W. Anderson

    Stupidity of Lenovo for *NIX consideration

    Even after all the previous recent software disasters and now this from Microsoft server software, Lenovo remains abnormally committed to Microsoft - to the extreme degree of dissing configuration requests for Redhat or SuSE Enterprise Linux on their servers and being embroiled in dispute over Linux install on their Yoga tablet.

    Any person, business, organization or government interested in deploying the far superior Linux or BSD UNIX-Like operating systems (OS) for their reliability, performance or security needs should never consider Lenovo, unless they too, are like Lenovo have Redmonds finger up their anus.

    1. Dave 107

      Re: Stupidity of Lenovo for *NIX consideration

      Lenovo has almost every flavor of Linux for their servers. https://lenovopress.com/osig#support=all They have alliance agreements with Redhat, and they install more SAP than any other vendor on SuSE.

      True, more work needs to be done to include more linux friendly hardware on a subset of their tablets/laptops. http://mjg59.dreamwidth.org/44694.html

  10. Gis Bun

    Why am I not surprised with Lenovo. So far I haven't seen any announcements from HPE, Dell or others with this issue. Always seems to be Lenovo [whether the server division or laptops/desktops] where they seem to scr?w something up.

  11. fredesmite Bronze badge

    FUCK YOU Microsoft

    what else need I say?

  12. Spaceman Spiff

    UEFI, what a joke! I call it Secure Bork because it will bork you system almost as often as it will boot.

  13. Geoff Campbell
    Facepalm

    Wait, what?

    Lenovo make servers? Who knew?

    GJC

  14. Bob Dole (tm)
    WTF?

    Fishy...

    Why does this sound to me like Lenovo has installed back doors on these servers that Microsoft is boarding up?

    1. a_yank_lurker Silver badge

      Re: Fishy...

      Or Slurp is installing backdoors that require some UEFI policies to set differently. Wouldn't be surprised either way. My limited experience with UEFI is it an incompetent "solution" to the problem of 'bloat being a buggy mess. Instead of fixing 'bloat, Slurp forces others to find a solution. Mine is not to use 'bloat.

  15. GrapeBunch Silver badge

    Swedish chef of rouge monde

    I was called in to help set up a new desktop. Not as a tech consultant, but as a relative. On another table was a kaput 2013-era HP Pavilion, regraded to Windows 10. Its demise had been foretold months earlier by it taking more than an hour to boot up. But by then it was in repair mode loop, tested for hours. I thought I'd take a stab and the only thing I could think of was to change the boot order in BIOS, boot a PE USB and remove the suspected malware. A first attempt didn't change anything. The second, deeper, attempt caused the computer to make me enter a 4-digit code. I believe that was defeating the UEFI-thing, but what do I *know*? Sadly, it didn't boot my USB stick, but happily it did boot to Windows 10. It was obviously a damaged Windows 10, but at least I was able to remove about 1,000 unwanted entries with mwb. Also removed one protection service that the owner had signed up for, leaving two still there. Then I connected the Internet, which may have been a far bridge. 12 hours later, much had changed on the display, including improved screen resolution, but also a different colour scheme with a yellowish-greenish cast. I thought, oh maybe there was a piece of software that filtered out blue during night time, but couldn't find such a thing on the computer. Or maybe a hardware issue had developed. Don't know the conclusion, as my time at the venue was up.

    Anyway, this story is too long. No smoking gun, but it does tend to support the thought that a UEFI computer was borked by a Windows 10 upgrade. But who cares? Perhaps more importantly, it instantiates (couldn't resist) a way that might make use of perfectly good computers without tearing them down for parts: change the boot-order so drastically that it makes you input the UEFI-breaking code.

    Please correct my mistakes!

    1. GrapeBunch Silver badge

      Re: Swedish chef of rouge monde

      "Please correct my mistakes". A lazy person instead just gives a thumbs-down.

  16. ahmed gawish

    how to fix after effect ?

    if i got infected with this problem ,,, is it ok to upgrade the UEFI after ??

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2019