back to article Jacob Appelbaum quits Tor Project amid 'sex misconduct' accusations

Jacob Appelbaum has left the Tor Project amid claims of "sexual misconduct" that he says are "unsubstantiated and unfounded." Appelbaum, 33, a prominent hacker and privacy advocate, was a core developer of the anonymizing network software. His departure was announced in a terse statement just before the weekend: Long time …

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        1. This post has been deleted by a moderator

        2. Adam 52 Silver badge

          "I feel like a reporter now"

          Good job you're not, otherwise your libel insurance would be about to take a big hit. As it is you get to hide behind El Reg and let them take the blame.

          1. PleebSmasher
            Trollface

            "libel"

            I take it you're British? No freedom of speech, your votes don't count, still pay for a monarchy, still ruled over by EU bureaucrats?

            Anyway, not linking to the blog post is a meaningless gesture.

            1. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Anyway, not linking to the blog post is a meaningless gesture

              I disagree. It's taking a stand. Probably more against libel laws than opinion, but it's a deliberate choice.

            2. Ben Tasker Silver badge

              > I take it you're British? No freedom of speech, your votes don't count,

              Funny, those first 2 seem to apply to the opposite side of the pond too.

              As far as the monarchy goes, it seems at last check, they bring in more money that we pay to support them, which seems to be in line with the capitalist dream, no?

            3. Halcin

              I take it you're British? No freedom of speech...

              Unlike some parts of the world we don't consider "freedom of speech" to mean freedom from responsibility or accountability.

              1. Anonymous Coward
                Anonymous Coward

                >Unlike some parts of the world we don't consider "freedom of speech" to mean freedom from responsibility or accountability.

                After living in Germany and visiting the UK often all I got to say enjoy your paradise (it was a nice experience) but the best thing I ever did was come home across the pond. Freedom of speech and fair use are two of the rare progressive things we have that I am surprised the rest of the developed world doesn't realize what its missing.

                1. Anonymous Coward
                  Anonymous Coward

                  To be fair as great as the first Amendment (freedom of speech) is of course we have certain types trying to use it to justify denying rights to others on the basis of religious "freedom" (as long as it is only their religion we are talking about). Like I said US, progressive, and rare are usually found together. Sigh.

  2. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Takeover of TOR

    I wonder which US agencies would have a vested interest in seeing that happen.

    Classic tactics - displace, persecute, threaten and allege sexual misconduct - see tactics used on Assange to stifle wikileaks

    1. Wayland Bronze badge

      Re: Takeover of TOR

      Obviously it's very difficult to say if the allegations are true, which is why it's such a powerful tactic.

      TOR is an attempt to build a new Internet on top of the existing one. Great in principle but it will have all the same problems of the existing one. It's easy to see why someone would want to run a large internet seeing as the current one is so successful. It's easy to see that the gov and corps would want in.

    2. TeeCee Gold badge
      Meh

      Re: Takeover of TOR

      Now that's straight from the other side of the pond.

      There's nothing the septics love as much as a classic tinfoil-hat, big guvmint conspiracy.

      1. Suricou Raven

        Re: Takeover of TOR

        One thing the various leaks have now shown is that sometimes those conspiracy theories can be right.

        1. asdf Silver badge

          Re: Takeover of TOR

          The 5 eyes show this US vs UK thing is something that only gets stoked on the pro privacy side.

  3. Groaning Ninny

    The blog ppst

    The blog post (which I assume was linked to in the removed comments above) doesn't appear to contain anything defamatory. It states that allegations have been made which are being investigated, and that the Project is receiving legal advice from specialists in that area.

    An interesting part:

    "People who believe they may have been victims of criminal behavior are advised to contact law enforcement. We recognize that many people in the information security and Internet freedom communities don't necessarily trust law enforcement. We encourage those people to seek advice from people they trust, and to do what they believe is best for them."

    Probably good general advice, but what a world we live in.

    1. Ben Tasker Silver badge

      Re: The blog ppst

      I don't know, but I suspect at least one of the deleted comments probably linked to the domain that's been, err, dedicated to ioerror - which very definitely does contain a lot of defamatory stuff.

      No idea whether the allegations are true (other than that he can be a knob at times), but that site and the social media witchhunt make me sad to be part of the community. There's no reason for everything to have been done quite so publicly (the site in particular), particularly at this stage, and for a privacy loving community to seemingly take so much delight in a public burning doesn't sit well.

      1. PleebSmasher
        Dead Vulture

        Re: The blog ppst

        @Ben Tasker: No, I linked to a page on the Tor Project blog only, not the website Appelbaum mentions.

        1. Ben Tasker Silver badge

          Re: The blog ppst

          > No, I linked to a page on the Tor Project blog only, not the website Appelbaum mentions.

          Strange then, the second paragraph of the statement is a bit unnecessary IMO, but otherwise not quite sure it'd fall under defamatory, even if the language is a little woolly

        2. asdf Silver badge

          Re: The blog ppst

          Instead of the reg on that tombstone can we get one with Gawker on it? Whatcha ya gonna do brother, when the 24" pythons and Hulkamania run wild on you!?

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: The blog ppst

      The longer blog post states the nature of the alleged harassment. Normally such matters are dealt with privately until they're substantiated... for which UK law apparently sets a higher bar.

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: The blog ppst

      'The blog post (which I assume was linked to in the removed comments above) doesn't appear to contain anything defamatory.'

      Not defamatory?, I suppose it depends how you want to read it, more precisely, how a lawyer would read it, words being such twisty little things...

      From my reading of the blog post alluded to, It didn't exactly do him any favours. The tone of the whole post, the language used throughout it, basically screams that the person who 'stepped down' was as 'guilty as hell' of the allegations against him, even though there has been no talk of any formal police investigations.

      The innocent and helpful paragraph you quote above

      '..People who believe they may have been victims of criminal behavior ...'

      whilst it's all sage advice on the surface, it could also be interpreted as someone covering their bases by setting up quite nicely the 'no one is talking as they don't like the police' scenario

      '..We recognize that many people in the information security and Internet freedom communities don't necessarily trust law enforcement..'

      1. PleebSmasher
        Holmes

        Re: The blog ppst

        "whilst it's all sage advice on the surface, it could also be interpreted as someone covering their bases by setting up quite nicely the 'no one is talking as they don't like the police' scenario

        '..We recognize that many people in the information security and Internet freedom communities don't necessarily trust law enforcement.."

        @Anon: Or it could be, you know, TRUE. Call me crazy, but Tor users and developers are a group that tend to be both paranoid and distrustful of law enforcement.

  4. Ben Tasker Silver badge

    IOError's Statement

    Jake has (just) published a statement - http://www.twitlonger.com/show/n_1soorlp / https://twitter.com/ioerror/status/739731362404536320

    1. David Glasgow

      Re: IOError's Statement

      Oooh! Post not found. Que pasa?

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: IOError's Statement

        It says.. Dice... el abogado me follen, soy inocente!

      2. Old Handle
        Boffin

        Re: IOError's Statement

        That's two URLs separated by a slash, not one big one. I confess that confused me briefly too, so I'm guessing you tried to paste the whole thing. They're both still up for me.

  5. Old Handle
    WTF?

    And why does the attack website make you enable javascript to see the accusations? That's just beyond strange knowing how security conscious their target audience is. Unless getting Tor users to turn that on is the whole point of course.

    1. asdf Silver badge

      In their defense try using nothing but dillo for a week and you will realize javascript as much as an attack vector that it is, is a must.

      1. Old Handle

        It's a must for the browser yes, but only because idiot designers use it for no good reason. It's not a must when building most web sites, a simple page listing accusations against someone would be a prime example of a situation where it's not needed.

        To it's credit, this site right here works just fine without JS, and El Reg's got a whole lot more going on than [redacted].net does. While I'm mostly joking about the implication that it's a trap... only mostly. It really does seem like quite a strange choice in that context.

        1. asdf Silver badge

          >because idiot designers

          So glad you didn't say developers because they sure aren't.

  6. Matt Bryant Silver badge
    Meh

    Meh.

    I'm waiting to see what the actual charges brought by the authorities are (or if any charges are even brought). It could just be someone inside the team with an axe to grind. Of course, it is amusingly ironic that someone that works on a service beloved by paedophiles and drug dealers should be accused of "sexual crimes" by his own colleagues.

    1. asdf Silver badge

      Re: Meh.

      >a service beloved by paedophiles and drug dealers

      The internet?

  7. Jake Maverick

    always the way in it? criticise PTB then suddenly you're a sex offender or you get invaded....nobody else see the pattern here? i find it all very dubious....

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