back to article German boffins smash records with 37km wireless spurt at 6Gbps

A team of German scientists has managed to establish a 6Gbps wireless link over a distance of 37 kilometers using newly developed antennas and receivers. The Advanced E Band Satellite Link Studies team established a connection between a base station and the town of Wachtberg using hardware with monolithically integrated …

  1. DougS Silver badge

    Given the effect of rain of satellite broadcasts in the 10-20 GHz range, what does rain or even fog do to these 70 GHz transmissions? They aren't too useful as a replacement for fiber if they only work 90% of the time!

    1. Martin Summers Silver badge

      Now you're just clouding the argument.

      1. Gavin King

        It's currently fashionable to put data into the cloud; this just eliminates the middle-man.

      2. AndrueC Silver badge
        Joke

        Raining on their parade a little bit.

    2. DougS Silver badge

      Not to take away from the joking

      But I think I figured it out from the later comments. Such a high frequency traveling via a point to point link over such a short distance would maintain a tight beam between two parabolic antenna. Thus most of that 1 watt of power reaches the other end. Compared to satellite broadcasts, where DBS is output with maybe 250 watts or so but is often spread across an entire continent, so the power level that reaches the subscriber is crazy low, something like a trillionth of a trillionth of a watt. Obviously that's going to be affected by interference to a far greater degree.

  2. Martin Summers Silver badge

    I'm sure some comms company in the UK will be all over this for our 'not spots'... Where's a laughing hilariously emoticon when you need one?

  3. Pascal Monett Silver badge

    24Mbit/s to 250 separate internet connections

    Right, so realistically that means 2.4Mb/s for 250 connections, and 0.24Mb/s for 2500 connections.

    Because really, 250 connections ? Over 37km ? Did they calibrate that for the desert ?

    A 37km radius is going to cover tens of thousands of connections. They'll need more than one of those for all that.

    But never mind - the important bit is that connectivity is on an inexorable march forward. If only privacy could be on such a path.

    1. asdf Silver badge

      Re: 24Mbit/s to 250 separate internet connections

      >A 37km radius is going to cover tens of thousands of connections. They'll need more than one of those for all that.

      Downtown London yes but around where the Cliven Bundy cult is (ones not in jail) not so much.

    2. Mage Silver badge

      Re: A 37km radius

      No, it's PURELY point to point links, like we have up to 1Gbps now. Just better.

      It's not to the end user. It MIGHT feed a ADSL+ cabinet with 250 users in a village, or 25 users with VDSL

    3. goldcd

      Re: 24Mbit/s to 250 separate internet connections

      Yes, but you are ignoring contention here.

      It's a pisser when you hit it, but broadly we aren't needing to all use our max capacity at once.

      Plus, when you can throw up a 6Gbps connection in the air, you don't have to think any more about "*a* link to my village".

      It's more we can shove a pole in the ground and get 6Gbps from anywhere we can see with fibre in the ground and aggregate it.

      IMHO meshing and caching are going to be the next leap - we're all consuming huge amounts of data, but once you've cached the top 1000 items on youtube, top 500 on netflix and all the rest..

      1. bazza Silver badge

        Re: 24Mbit/s to 250 separate internet connections

        @goldcd,

        "Yes, but you are ignoring contention here.

        It's a pisser when you hit it, but broadly we aren't needing to all use our max capacity at once.

        Plus, when you can throw up a 6Gbps connection in the air, you don't have to think any more about "*a* link to my village"."

        Indeed, 6Gbps is 6Gbps. Never look a bandwidth gift-horse in the mouth!

        "IMHO meshing and caching are going to be the next leap - we're all consuming huge amounts of data, but once you've cached the top 1000 items on youtube, top 500 on netflix and all the rest.."

        Mesh is really, really hard. It's OK in static deployments where a network can learn the disposition of its nodes and adapt accordingly, possibly aided by adding extra nodes here and there where the mesh is thin. But its difficult to get serious bandwidth out of it. Mesh-on-the-move has always been nigh on impossible for all but trivial bandwidths.

        1. goldcd

          Re: 24Mbit/s to 250 separate internet connections

          On the move - I absolutely agree with you.

          But, most consumption is on static network.

          Example I always think of is my wife watching Eastenders on iPlayer. Sure virgin can cache it in whatever data-centre I end up in - but I'm pretty sure there are half-a-dozen copies already on the Tivos of people connected to that big green box at the bottom of my road.

  4. asdf Silver badge
    Trollface

    woohoo!!!!

    This is awesome. Now I can hit my monthly data limit in 2 to 3 seconds instead of turtle slow several minutes it now takes.

  5. Inventor of the Marmite Laser Silver badge

    A parabolic transmitting antenna and a parabolic receiving antenna

    Is that a piarabolics?

    1. Jeffrey Nonken Silver badge

      Re: A parabolic transmitting antenna and a parabolic receiving antenna

      I assume you meant "pairabolics"and gave you an upvote. For thinking of it first. You rat. :)

      Though I'd have said "pair-a-parabolics" but the pun works either way.

  6. Paul Crawford Silver badge

    El reg units?

    What is that rare expressed in kilowrists?

  7. JeffyPoooh Silver badge
    Pint

    It'd work better...

    I'd work better if they raised the dish a few more inches so the bottom third of the aperture wasn't blocked by the balcony. See image.

    1. Uffish

      Re: It'd work better...

      But then they would lose the backup link into the cloud from the metal sheet on top of the wall.

  8. ideapete
    Pint

    bits not Bytes

    http://www.ideapete.com/megaBS.html

  9. Shane McCarrick

    1W?

    Are you sure thats right?

    I use a 1W transmission from a Netgear Nighthawk ac/1900 in beam forming mode.

    Surely the Germans use a bit more power than I have at home for their kit?

    1. bazza Silver badge

      It's not required. At 70GHz with parabolic antennas about 30cm across (as seems to be the case) their beams will be extremely narrow, provided the antenna shape is accurate. It looks like they've machined them from solid billet, so I expect they're "perfect". Practically all of that 1W will be heading towards the receive antenna, provided both are pointed exactly at each other.

      Your "crummy" (pardon the phrase) Nighthawk has got three rubbish whip antennas, and can do about as much beam forming as I can when I fart; it mostly goes absolutely everywhere.

      So your nearly-omnidirectional 1W dissipates to undetectability over a much shorter range than their highly focused 1W.

      The WiFi distance records are all set using parabolic antennas. In fact you can buy specialised WiFi antenna for creating longer outdoor links that have much better directionality than your average router, such as this.

      1. Mage Silver badge

        WiFi Mesh

        Last month they switched off the 2.5GHz MMDS in Ireland. So loads of rural roofs with "free" 20dBi to 24dBi mesh dishes just like the one in the link. The older ones use a dipole and N -connector, so are fine for 2.4GHz. Newer ones need the LNA which replaced the stalk on old ones replaced.

      2. Swarthy Silver badge
        Alert

        Parabolic antennas

        I've been using 'em for yonks. But, being a bit skint, I have not used the fancy pre-manufactured ones, mainly I've used the "Pringles Can-tenna" and "Wok-Fi".

  10. TJ1

    "enough to transmit a DVD" - Teleportation German style!

    ... but do we have to stand under the dish to catch them or are they deployed as bird scarers?

  11. Sgt_Oddball Silver badge

    6Gbps?!

    Perfect for using a SAN array then.......in the next town over.

    Also with tight beam forming you could have a few of these side by side if you lined them up right I suppose that, and you'd need to make sure they were shielded from the wind as I could imagine gusty winds causing issues.

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