back to article Watch: SpaceX finally lands Falcon rocket on robo-barge in one piece

SpaceX has finally succeeded in landing the first stage of its Falcon rocket at sea – after blasting off more supplies to the orbiting International Space Station. Landing from the chase plane pic.twitter.com/2Q5qCaPq9P — SpaceX (@SpaceX) April 8, 2016 What you're seeing here is the lower stage of SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Congrats

    Here's to the SpaceX peeps. very well done!

  2. werdsmith Silver badge

    Watched their launch, separation and the successful landing (and all their whooping and hollering) live. Just amazing, a real payday mission and a successful experimental landing on a boat. Thunderbirds for real.

    1. Fibbles

      The landing was so smooth that at first I thought something had gone wrong with the media player so that I was watching the video in reverse.

  3. Lanky
    Thumb Up

    That might just be the coolest thing I ever seen on the interwebs. Amazing stuff.

    https://xkcd.com/54/

    1. Michael H.F. Wilkinson Silver badge
      Pint

      Brings back part of the excitement of the Apollo days. Well done to all at SpaceX

  4. Paddy Fagan
    Pint

    Well done :)

    The perfect end to a Friday evening. The footage is so good, it almost looks faked. I suspect there will be a few beers downed at SpaceX HQ tonight!

    1. Weapon

      Re: Well done :)

      It was a really good day as far as clear skies go. So the launch footage was excellent. Also good that they placed a camera outside the barge this time around so that we could see the footage just in case the rocket landing interfered with communications like in previous landings.

  5. peterkin

    Now all they have to do is keep on doing it.

  6. wx666z
    Pint

    Yay!

    See title. And congrats to all at SpaceX.

  7. GregC

    Outstanding

    Very, very impressive. Congrats to the SpaceX team - what really impressed me was, after all the setbacks, how simple it looked. The thing just... landed.

    Of course, they have to make it repeatable now, and it has to actually be reusable. But it's a big step.

  8. Martin Budden Bronze badge

    Windy

    The white tops on the waves tell me it was pretty windy out there when the landing happened, so the smoothness of the landing is a superb result. Well done SpaceX.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Windy

      It looks like the booster was actually "crabbing" into the wind to stay on target, and straightened up during the last two seconds. Landing aircraft do this during crosswinds, but they do it horizontally and they have a lot more time and leeway. They can also abort and try again.

      1. TechnicalBen Silver badge

        Re: Windy

        It also seemed to continue to right it's self after landing. You can see the jets firing after touchdown.

  9. Mark 85 Silver badge
    Pint

    Just the kind of great news needed to make Friday even better. Looking at the video and ocean chop and wave action, I wasn't sure it was going to happen.

    Space X deserves several cold ones each for this.

    1. phuzz Silver badge
      Pint

      I skipped to the logical conclusion and watched it in the pub :)

      In fact, next time someone asks "where's my flying car?" I'm going to point out that I sat in the pub, and on a handheld computer I watched a wirelessly transmitted video of an unmanned rocket, launch a payload to a permanently manned spacestation, and then land on an autonomous barge.

      The future is definitely here.

  10. et tu, brute?
    Pint

    Congratulations to SpaceX!

    And thank you for a wonderful extra present on my birthday!

    It was actually just more than a year ago that I posted a comment to say a successful landing would be a perfect present, as their next attempt would have been on the 8th of Aprilf, and now it happened! (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/02/11/spacex_launches_dscovr_satellite_into_deep_space_after_4_day_and_ten_year_wait/)

    Lifting one to the geniuses at SpaceX!

  11. Professur

    I was listening to the webcast on my bluetooth .... when the Falcon landed ... I pretty much lost hearing in that ear. They're gonna need tools to pry the smiles off their faces.

  12. hugo tyson
    Happy

    Yay indeed!

    I'll drink to that; wups, I was anyway!

  13. Captain DaFt

    Dat link:

    pic.twitter.com/2Q5qCaPq9P

    "This browser does not support video playback."

    No, you twatters, it does. It's your crappy website that doesn't support HTML5!

    1. Flocke Kroes Silver badge

      Re: Dis link:

      CRS-8 T-18 minutes until landing. youtube-dl.

      1. Maleku

        Re: Dis link:

        http://www.ytdl.info

    2. VinceH Silver badge

      Re: Dat link:

      "No, you twatters, it does. It's your crappy website that doesn't support HTML5!"

      Well it's not Flash, because I wouldn't have been able to watch it here if it was.

    3. Paul Kinsler

      Re: Dat link:

      More to the point, is there some way to see the rocket better, using portrait? These widescreen formats are just terrible for rocket take-off/landing videos :)

  14. Trollslayer Silver badge
    Thumb Up

    The next step

    is here.

    Well done SpaceX!

  15. PhilipN Silver badge

    Brilliant and thanks

    The 21st Century got kick-started yesterday.

    One of the most significant technological events in our lifetimes - or ever.

  16. ravenviz
    Thumb Up

    The moon landing of our day

    See above

  17. ravenviz
    Thumb Up

    A rocket for ... coming down!

    Of course a great credit to Goddard and von Braun ... but they never thought of this!

    Elon Musk, Rocketeer, Man of History

    1. Voland's right hand Silver badge

      Re: A rocket for ... coming down!

      Err...

      First and foremost: Tsiolkovsky - he did the math. The "Tsiolkovski equation" knows no mercy :)

      The rest - Goddard, von Braun, Korolev and today Musk is engieneering.

      By the way - all of Musk illustrious predecessors thought of this - rocket take off, rocket return. The reason they did not even try is that the control technology for doing that in atmospheric conditions was simply not there till about 20 years ago. The automated glided landing version was tested once for Buran and considered for the Zenit first stage. Glided is slightly easier than vertical as the feedback loops are not so strong and the differential equations describing the process are not so insanely stiff. End of the day it was dropped.

    2. 's water music Silver badge
      Coat

      Re: A rocket for ... coming down!

      Of course a great credit to Goddard and von Braun

      Dunno about Goddard but AIUI coming down wasn't Werner's department

    3. hammarbtyp Silver badge

      Re: A rocket for ... coming down!

      Von Braun had great experience in bringing rockets down, but generally head first

  18. Sorry that handle is already taken. Silver badge

    Congratulations etc.

    If only they'd cut out that cringeworthy "USA!" chanting.

    1. Gene Cash Silver badge

      Re: Congratulations etc.

      No kidding (and I speak as an American)

      Neither NASA nor any of the other hidebound American rocketry firms could do this. They're only puffing their chests and announcing any sort of re-usability to simply keep up with Musk and not hemorrhage customers. I give ULA or Ariane maybe 20% chance to have something even partially reusable flying in TEN years.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Congratulations etc.

      > "If only they'd cut out that cringeworthy "USA!" chanting."

      Hey all you rocket techies, stop feeling proud for your country! At least don't utter it out loud. Don't you know there are people in the world that find such pro-USA feelings offensive? We're not interested in your disgusting patriotism, so stop it!

      1. hplasm Silver badge
        Meh

        Re: Congratulations etc.

        Sadly, due to the spread of American culture to the World...

        "Hey all you rocket techies, stop sounding like a bunch of Homer Simpsons."

        There, FTFY.

    3. Professur

      Re: Congratulations etc.

      as opposed to their only real competition who use russian build motors. A large part of the SpaceX culture is to bring back national pride and employment and not just focus on the bottom line. You did know that the USA hasn't lifted a human in nearly a decade? Next time you go to Walmart or Tesco ... try and find a toaster that's not made in China. Might be well all need a little more of that USA or UK chanting in our lives.

      1. werdsmith Silver badge

        Re: Congratulations etc.

        But where is the UK going to find a clever South African / Canadian to help win back that pride?

        I think Elon is a one off.

        1. Fink-Nottle
          Coat

          Re: Congratulations etc.

          > But where is the UK going to find a clever South African to help win back that pride?

          What ... isn't it enough that we South Africans provide the talent for English rugby and cricket?

        2. emmanuel goldstein

          Re: Congratulations etc.

          Even if someone of his calibre did, for some unfathomable reason, choose to live here in Blighty, they'd be so shackled by poor infrastructure, red tape (health and safety alone would be enough), bloated and second-rate local governance and a general lack of imagination that I'd be extremely surprised if they were able to produce a usable rocket, let alone a reusable one!

          1. oolor
            Trollface

            Re: Blighty's poor infrastructure

            Ya, he'd be driving around the Spanish countryside trying to find where the heck it landed...

            1. werdsmith Silver badge

              Re: Blighty's poor infrastructure

              Even if someone of his calibre did, for some unfathomable reason, choose to live here in Blighty, they'd be so shackled by poor infrastructure, red tape (health and safety alone would be enough), bloated and second-rate local governance and a general lack of imagination that I'd be extremely surprised if they were able to produce a usable rocket, let alone a reusable one!

              This being a problem that exists almost entirely in the management layer.

              And is correct in the last three decades people like Richard Noble and David Ashford seem to have the right stuff and there are plenty of the right kind of engineering minds, but operating against the small minded cretins that creep and manipulate their way into control is like wading through treacle.

          2. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Congratulations etc.

            Indeed, take a look at "Standard" brand fireworks. Made proudly here in the UK.

            I have cigarette lighters with more explosive force.

            1. Paul Kinsler

              Re: "Standard" brand fireworks. Made proudly here in the UK.

              I much preferred those old-fashioned Congreve ones.

        3. MrXavia

          Re: Congratulations etc.

          "I think Elon is a one off."

          We have Alan Bond, he just doesn't have Elons money to build it yet...

    4. Steve I

      Re: Congratulations etc.

      Yeah - especially as NASA were the first to show that for real rocket science, it's not enough to use Nazi technology, you need an actual Nazi...

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Congratulations etc.

        > "Yeah - especially as NASA were the first to show that for real rocket science, it's not enough to use Nazi technology, you need an actual Nazi..."

        And who did the Nazis look to for guidance? A regular guy from the USA, Robert Goddard, that's who. So let's not have any more of this 'Nazi' crap, okay?

        1. Steve I

          Re: Congratulations etc.

          Lighten up - Space X's achievement is amazing. And you're never going to re-write history and pretend that Von Braun didn't build the Saturn 5 :-)

          https://xkcd.com/984/

    5. Esme

      Re: Congratulations etc.

      I don't begrudge them that, although personally I think they should be chanting 'SpaceX' rather than 'USA', This because for too long the US space industry has been blighted by the demands of politics causing what got built to be what was politically acceptable rather than what was technically best and financially cost-effective rather more often than not.

      In short, Space X is a well-deserved kick in the arse for the ULA, and makes me wonder what NASA might have achieved had it been free from political oversight. If Space X had been around when the Apollo program was started, maybe I would've been knocking lumps off rocks on Mars in my 40's, instead of doing dreary office jobs.

      But amyway - despite my distaste for the USA as a country, no I cannot begrudge the SpaceX folk their pride in what they have achieved, and if they wish to voice that as pride in their country, that's fine by me, it's a kind of nationalism I can get behind. Well done, SpaceX, it's folk like you that might make America great, not the Donald Trumps of the world!

    6. Matthew Taylor

      Re: Congratulations etc.

      They just landed a rocket on a barge, for god's sake - they can chant whatever they want!

    7. jzl

      Re: Congratulations etc.

      > "If only they'd cut out that cringeworthy "USA!" chanting."

      Speaking as a Brit, I enjoyed that. Give it to them - they've earned it. After all, last time I checked SpaceX wasn't French or British. And they weren't chanting it for jingoism, but for pride and joy.

  19. This post has been deleted by its author

  20. JeffyPoooh Silver badge
    Pint

    "...live-streamed the landing from a helicopter."

    Next, try live-streaming from a helicopter while the booster lands on the helicopter.

    1. Sorry that handle is already taken. Silver badge

      Re: "...live-streamed the landing from a helicopter."

      I don't know why this is receiving mostly downvotes? The mental image got a solid chuckle out of me.

      1. AdamT

        Re: "...live-streamed the landing from a helicopter."

        yeah - I don't get that either. Given that "catching the rocket engines with a helicopter" is actually the plan of ULA for their Vulcan project...

  21. Fruit and Nutcase Silver badge
    Coat

    meeces to pieces

    Scientists want to dissect the mice and discover how badly they have suffered from muscle loss and bone decay while in orbit.

    What are the chances one of the scientists being a Mr. Jinks

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pixie_and_Dixie_and_Mr._Jinks

    1. hplasm Silver badge
      Happy

      Re: meeces to pieces

      "The mice, of course, were furious..."

      Slartibartfast.

  22. Elmer Phud

    Coming soon . . . "Those waves look backwards!"

    . . . "Space X landing faked!!"

    Will be linked to moon 'landings' and the wonderful 9/11 hoax cries.

    I can hear the woodwork creaking as they begin to emerge

    1. Destroy All Monsters Silver badge

      Re: Coming soon . . . "Those waves look backwards!"

      What will happen to the 9/11 truuters when the "28 pages" will hit the front page?

  23. Bob Rocket
    Thumb Up

    pointy stick

    Top landing, well done.

    On my boat the big pointy stick (mast) is secured by wire stays attached at the top, on unstayed masts it is set into a hole in the deck.

    How do they stop the rocket from falling over the side once it has touched down and switched off, I didn't see a swarm of robotic deckhands come rushing out to secure it ?

    Perhaps they use magnets or the rocket has a big suction cup on the bottom.

    1. Highroads

      Re: pointy stick

      It's all about the base - apparently most of the mass is the bottom end after landing. I heard some hand-waving explanation about welding the feet to the deck afterwards. I seems more likely to me that they have some special fixtures that they put over the feet and tie down to hard points on the deck for the journey back. Wire stays - probably sensible to add once the structure is stabilised.

      1. notowenwilson

        Re: pointy stick

        Welding things to the deck is standard practice for the offshore industry. It's fast, very strong, easy to do and doesn't need the item to be in an exact location. I dare say the legs are plenty strong enough (since they are sized for dynamic landing forces) to handle the wind and vessel movement forces involved given that most of the weight is in the base.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: pointy stick

      The base of the rocket where all the engines are is very heavy. Above that it's mostly a very thin skinned fuel tank so it's very stable up to angles of 10 degrees. Wind pressure however is a big issue as it's effectively a huge sail. As soon as the rocket is made safe they board the drone ship, put metal shoes over the landing leg feet and weld the shoes to the deck.

      1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

        Re: pointy stick

        Cobblers - they nail them on.

  24. Highroads
    Thumb Up

    Extremely impressive

    You could tell it was really just a matter of time before SpaceX succeeded. They were so close a few times now. I am still mightily impressed by the physics and engineering involved. The live coverage was good too. Surely we need more of this kind of thing.

    Congrats to everyone involved.

    1. Charles 9 Silver badge
      Thumb Up

      Re: Extremely impressive

      How many attempts did it take them to get one to stick? I lost count, but this is, what, the fifth attempt at the barge landing?

      Not bad at all. I was rather expecting around 9 or 10 attempts before they stuck one.

  25. Osgard Leach

    The 5 stages of technology;

    1) Impossible

    2) Unbelievable

    3) Amazing

    4) Routine

    5) Obsolete

    We've gone from the original idea,(stage 1), to the drone footage of Grasshopper (stage 2), to this landing (stage 3).

    With the speed things are moving on I have little doubt most of us will be around to witness the last two as well.

    SABRE perhaps?

  26. TeeCee Gold badge
    WTF?

    BEAM

    After testing, the ISS version will be detached and fired back to Earth so that it can burn up in the atmosphere.

    Er, why?

    Surely (a) they could do with the free space, if only to horse around in and (b) proving that the thing's up to the job long term would be rather useful (as in you wouldn't want to proceed with its planned use without that proof).

    1. Dave Bell

      Re: BEAM

      You can experience some of the reasons in Kerbal Space Program. They have a limited number of docking ports within reach of their robot arm. and this will be using one of them. I have had to do some very extreme Kerbalism to get around the problem,

      And I am able to make game saves before risking an earth-shattering kaboom.

      1. Alistair Silver badge
        Windows

        Re: BEAM

        @ Dave Bell

        The Marvin reference gets you an upvote from my wife. My eldest and youngest would toss you upvotes for Kerbal if they could.

    2. imanidiot Silver badge

      Re: BEAM

      As said. Docking space is limited on thr ISS. With all the ships about to be attached I think there is 1 port left in a rather awkward location. And there is a module planned to be attached to the port the biggalow bouncy castle will be.

      1. Alan Brown Silver badge

        Re: BEAM

        "With all the ships about to be attached I think there is 1 port left in a rather awkward location."

        Time to add more ports....

        1. Charles 9 Silver badge

          Re: BEAM

          Nice idea, but the ports needs to be accessible by the arm, the arm has a fixed range of mobility, the ports need to be a certain minimum distance apart, and they only have enough power for one arm, so they're kinda stuck with what they've got.

          1. Bob Rocket

            Re: BEAM - lack of ports

            Expand the number of ports by sending up a module consisting of an arm and 8 ports (think powered USB)

            1. gregthecanuck

              Re: BEAM - lack of ports

              USB = Universal Space Bus?

            2. Charles 9 Silver badge

              Re: BEAM - lack of ports

              Did you neglect to note the nature of the space station's power? They only have enough power for ONE arm, and there aren't a lot of external power sources in outer space. One cardinal rule of USB is that you don't attach a bus-powered hub to another bus-powered hub.

              1. Matthew Taylor

                Re: BEAM - lack of ports

                Presumably they could have more than one, as long as they only used one at a time. Not that another robot arm is a realistic prospect of course, but power wouldn't seem to be the problem.

                1. Charles 9 Silver badge

                  Re: BEAM - lack of ports

                  "Presumably they could have more than one, as long as they only used one at a time. Not that another robot arm is a realistic prospect of course, but power wouldn't seem to be the problem."

                  Not possible in the situation described as you'd need to be able to do a hand-off, meaning you have to co-ordinate the two arms, meaning you'd need them both operating. I don't think one can rapidly switch power between the two in such a scenario, plus there's the risk that turning one off will allow it to drift, making alignment more difficult.

                  In any event, Canadarm2 (the arm aboard the ISS, officially the MSS) turns out to be self-relocatable, so it could maneuver itself into a port extension. But like with a tangle of USB hubs, I'd feel a little uncomfortable about the logistics.

  27. John Smith 19 Gold badge
    Go

    It's an impressive *technical* achievement

    Now let's see what it does to their prices.

    Because if it doesn't lower their prices a lot, so what?

    1. hplasm Silver badge

      Re: It's an impressive *technical* achievement

      Because if it doesn't lower their prices a lot, so what?

      It can increase the number of launches possible in a set period as well?

      1. John Smith 19 Gold badge
        Unhappy

        Re: It's an impressive *technical* achievement

        "It can increase the number of launches possible in a set period as well?"

        That's only useful if there are customers who want that capacity.

        That only happens if a 30% price cut is big enough to offset the drop in SX revenues.

        Some think it will be.

        But that still means you throw away the 2nd stage which is around $15-20m.

        While that continues a flight will still cost tens of $m.

        1. jzl

          Re: It's an impressive *technical* achievement

          Demand is a function of price at the moment. Reduce the price and demand will, for want of a better word, skyrocket.

          1. John Smith 19 Gold badge
            Unhappy

            Demand is a function of price at the moment.

            "Reduce the price and demand will, for want of a better word, skyrocket."

            It is hoped demand will skyrocket.

            In reality there is very limited evidence for price elasticity in the launch services market. Hint. You can't buy a rocket, you buy basically a ticket on a rocket for ride at some (usually years) time in the future.

            They will still be discarding the 2nd stage and that costs in the tens of millions and it's never not going to cost tens of millions

            Will people be queuing up for launches at $40m in a way they are not at $60m?

            My instinct says no. I don't think raising the money for a launch at $40m is that much easier for a project than it is at $60m.

            But we'll find out.

    2. Anonymous John

      Re: It's an impressive *technical* achievement

      A 30% discount according to SpaceX. A $20million saving. They hope to reuse this one as early as June.

  28. Mephistro Silver badge
    Angel

    "...the good drone-ship Of course I still love you."

    Hopefully, Ian Banks is reading this from the orbital he resides in now, and smiling!

    On a side note, the innuendo in the ship's name was only obvious to me when I saw the -ahem- erect rocket on the barge!.

    "Is that a rocket in your deck or are you happy to see me?"

  29. Alan Brown Silver badge

    Mice

    "mice that will spend time in the microgravity of the space station before being returned to Earth."

    No cats?

    "We wish to observe how a cat can right itself whilst in microgravity - and what happens if hot buttered toast is strapped to the cat, buttered side 'up' "

    1. Charles 9 Silver badge

      Re: Mice

      Not enough room in the capsule, I heard. Plus while that "bounce house" may be rated for micrometeors, I think the jury's out on cat claws.

    2. dajames Silver badge

      Re: Mice

      No cats?

      I'm having difficulty wondering how a zero-G litter tray might work ... or smell.

      1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge
        Happy

        Re: Mice

        Oh come on!!! I've seen horses with nappies, a cat should be no problem. You can have a try getting it on the cat first though!

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Mice

          "Oh come on!!! I've seen horses with nappies,"

          Just what every budding astronaut dreams of, changing cat nappies!

    3. Robin Bradshaw

      Re: Mice

      Cats in zero-G on a military parabolic flight:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9XtK6R1QAk

  30. JaitcH
    Thumb Up

    Remember, John F. Kennedy and NASA had the faith to follow their dreams.

    Just think how the Hubble Telescope was born in controversy, with mis-ground optics, and here we are some 25 years later, at a cost of USD$2,500,000,000, having provided the world with some of the most stunning photographs of the darkest corners of the universes.

    And it's running on a 486 PC!

    1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

      Re: Remember, John F. Kennedy and NASA had the faith to follow their dreams.

      Born as a product of a Nasa that had grown too big too fast as a result of the Apollo race and was desperate for large projects to justify itself and put jobs in the right constituencies . Placed in a useless orbit 4 years late and at 3x the cost so that it could be launched by a vehicle which was itself the result of the same mindset.

      A lot of the good HST did was funding students and postdocs to work on the data and creating a software and organisational (STSCI) infrastructure to process - the images from ground based telescopes got a lot better a lot faster. The VLT was built for the same money that a singe HST servicing mission cost.

  31. hypernovasoftware

    Didn't they also launch 11 satellites?

    No mention of this?

  32. bigphil9009

    Tat bazzar

    And just think people, this utterly brilliant advancement in rocket science and possibly in our next phase of discovery has been funded by people using a certain payment service to buy random items of stuff - we can probably all claim to have contributed to this incredible achievement and I for one am incredibly glad of this.

  33. The Islander

    Post euphoric bliss

    There's a rather significant aspect to the achievement for SpaceX as a private company rather than a government agency.

    As Musk has shown in his accumulation of wealth, he is a businessman out to make a profit.

    Will this most recent success yield shared knowledge that benefits large swathes of mankind, or concentrate that knowledge for (his) corporate profit? Will it be used to further science? Will it be used to cater for a very small elitist clientele? And so on.

    Undoubtedly a great technological achievement but where does the road go now? There must be a more balanced way for billionaire czars to direct human endeavour, methinks.

    1. Matthew Taylor

      Re: Post euphoric bliss

      The benefit and knowledge will go where, and how, Elon Musk decides it should go. It is his. He's the one who decided to do this incredibly significant thing with his billions, so the fruits of his labours are his. And that is morally right, he has proved himself deserving of this, by achieving it.

      I dislike left-wingers' insistence that politicians are the sort of people to whom we ought to give such decision making powers.In my view, such career politicians are a bunch of second hand car salesmen, the slimiest and most ruthless of which gets to the top. I can't think of a worse system to be honest. I can't wait for the day when the entire professional political class is disintermediated. Personally I'd much rather a good hearted, driven "doer" like Elon Musk was in charge of such things, than a load of "elected" politicians in thrall to donors, and their own political careers.

    2. petboy

      Re: Post euphoric bliss

      but where does the road go now?

      Mars.

    3. mosw

      Re: Post euphoric bliss

      Now that SpaceX has proven it can be done - others will follow. I am sure there are many rocket scientist types that knew it could be done but the cost and risks got in the way. Now even the bean counters know it can be done so more investment should find its way into reusable systems.

  34. tojb

    +99 for culture reference

    The drone ship "Of Course I Still Love You". Awesome

  35. Alistair Silver badge
    Windows

    Pinned one!

    The folks at the pizza store thought I was outta my mind. Watched it on my phone while waiting for my pickup.

    My wife thought I'd lost it too.

  36. Dom 3

    BEAM

    It's tacked on to the side of the main dwelling... it's constructed differently... it's not intended to be actually lived in... it's about six foot by six foot by twelve... it is quite clearly a shed. I expect Peake will be nabbing it at the first opportunity.

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