back to article Data centers dig in as monster storm strikes America's East Coast

With a major snowstorm set to hit the East Coast of the US tonight, datacenter facilities in the hardest hit areas are hunkering down for what looks to be a rough weekend. According to the National Weather Service, the storm is expected to bring as much as two feet of snow over the weekend to a major portion of the Eastern …

  1. Notas Badoff Silver badge
    WTF?

    Nagging worries...

    Are the data centers saying they are doing all these wonderful things - now - so that they can claim they are "pro-active"? Umm, why were they waiting to do these worthy things?

    If they hadn't had several days warning to prepare... how were they going to claim that being down was out of their control, due to unforeseen calamity, when they are *already* supposed to be prepared to stay up according to the contracts!

    It just sounds like they are trying to catch up now with the guarantees they already sold? How about clarifications and/or rebates...

    1. jake Silver badge

      Re: Nagging worries...

      Who the fuck need a fucking telephone in this kind of situation? Shirley understanding how to survive in real weather is far more important?

      1. allthecoolshortnamesweretaken Silver badge

        Re: Nagging worries...

        Jake, sadly there are people out there for whom being able to access Tvvitter and Le livre des visages and whatnot is a life-or-death situation. (Hm. Why did the name Darwin just pop up in my mind?)

        Anyway, two feet of snow* shouldn't be more than a minor inconvenience**. If it is, there's something wrong.

        *In an area where snow isn't a phenomenon only known from books and tales told by visiting strangers, but falls from the sky every smegging year, and around the same time of year too.

        **Then again, I have relatives in Norway. The very north of Norway. And in the Alps. So my standards re coping with snow may be somewhat biased.

        1. Destroy All Monsters Silver badge

          Re: Nagging worries...

          Le livre des visages

          I have never heard of that particular grimoire.

          Do you go mad when reading it (irrespective of whether you are a Mad Arab named Abdul or not)

          1. Voyna i Mor Silver badge

            Re: Nagging worries...Do you go mad when reading it

            Not mad perhaps but apparently there is evidence that heavy use of le livre des visages can cause a degree of depression. More amitriptyline than Aleister Crowley.

          2. fedoraman
            Coat

            Re: Nagging worries...

            I don't go mad, but I just get these headaches ....

        2. Joe Drunk
          Pint

          Re: Nagging worries...

          Anyway, two feet of snow* shouldn't be more than a minor inconvenience**. If it is, there's something wrong.

          It really is just a minor inconvenience. We received 22 inches (55.8 CM) of snowfall in my area. That's probably the most in a decade but not life-altering. I've been through this way too many times. Basically during such a storm you are locked in your home for 1 day as they close major highways and shut down mass transit temporarily. Lots of vehicles get stuck or spin out due to icy road conditions, 4 wheel drive helps but no much from what I see out my window. You shouldn't be on the roads unless there is some extreme emergency that warrants the risk. Otherwise you stock up and purchase enough food/supplies/beer for 1 day of sitting around in your pajamas. One day only. Not clearing the grocery shelves of all bread/milk/bottled water/shovels/rock salt and the other mass hysteria you witness in the media. Stupid sheeple.

          I find this to be an excellent day to catch up on hobbies/online gaming marathon/streaming binge and snuggling up with a significant other.

          Today is snow removal, a few hours of work for this amount of snow. The highways have reopened and mass transit will be resuming shortly. Everything will be back to normal, just like it always has been during every large snowfall we've ever had in this area since I've been alive. One day of sitting around in your pajamas. That's all a blizzard equates to.

          The only ones who suffered are those experiencing power outages. I feel for these people because that means they probably have no heating and it is bitter cold right now.

          But mostly I feel for those who work in any data center environment because they have worked long, hard hours during this storm (I'm speaking from experience). Beer icon for them, and thanks for keeping our data pipes intact.

          1. Vic

            Re: Nagging worries...

            22 inches (55.8 CM)

            Really?

            Vic.

        3. jake Silver badge

          Re: Nagging worries...

          "I have relatives in Norway."

          All my Great Grand Parents are from Finland, north of the arctic circle. I have over-wintered with my kin five times. I thought I knew something about snow & ice (Denali). Boy, was I wrong ...

        4. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Nagging worries...

          I live in the north, well mid going by the length (Nordland), of Norway, not in Finnmark you are probably talking about, but 2 feet of snow in a weekend, nothing, that's time to bring out the BBQ :p

          But seriously, if it was only 2 feet of snow over the weekend, the roads would be cleared, I would also be out a couple of times a day to clear my driveway around my house (with the tractor).

          If somewhere gets snowfall every year, I don't see why it should be a problem.

      2. Credas Silver badge

        Re: Nagging worries...

        Maybe you'd fucking need one to call for fucking help if you had a fucking medical emergency. Or a fire. Or one of the many other reasons that real people need a telephone even if they are well-equipped survivalists hunkered down in their fully stocked shelters.

      3. GrumpenKraut Silver badge
        Boffin

        Re: Nagging worries...

        Suppose you wife had a heart attack. Telephone call to emergency is said to be more helpful than shouting "Toughen the fuck up!". I may be wrong, of course.

        1. Def Silver badge
          Joke

          Re: Nagging worries...

          If my wife suddenly had a heart attack, my first thought would be 'when the fuck did I get a wife?'. ;)

          1. Long John Brass Silver badge

            Re: Nagging worries...

            > when the fuck did I get a wife?

            This is not my beautiful wife; This is not my beautiful life

            And I think it works like this....

            http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/inertia-selling

            1. jake Silver badge

              Re: Nagging worries...

              To all the folks babbling about "getting an emergency call out" ... what makes you think that if you can't get to the hospital, emergency services can get to you? And aren't already so overloaded with calls that you are just background radiation? Have you really thought this through?

              1. Anonymous Coward
                Anonymous Coward

                Re: Nagging worries...

                "what makes you think that if you can't get to the hospital, "

                In most snowy situations in the UK, roads are blocked not by snow but by ill-prepared vehicles and/or drivers. Much the same goes for floods, as has been seen in several parts of the UK not long ago.

                Emergency services (and the other folks that help out when things get bad, as has happened recently in the UK) frequently have bad weather plans, skills, and equipment. These have a much better chance of working OK without excessive risk if dumb people don't set out unprepared on journeys they don't need to do, and then end up blocking other more important folks when they abandon their unnecessary journeys.

                Other folks delayed or blocked in such circumstances include not just the emergency services, but gritting wagons, and such.

                "already so overloaded with calls that you are just background radiation?"

                They might be. They might not be. If genuine emergency calls can't get through because of people chatting about last night's Corrie, or even justifiably whinging about the incompetence of the Highways Agency ...

                The emergency services cannot help those who they are unaware of. They cannot prioritise what they are unaware of.

                Have YOU really thought this through?

              2. Def Silver badge

                Re: Nagging worries...

                ...what makes you think that if you can't get to the hospital, emergency services can get to you?

                The fact that they own more helicopters than me.

  2. Ken Moorhouse Silver badge

    ...advising customers to keep their phone batteries charged...

    ...is a start. If an outage lasts more than a day, whose phone has the stamina to keep going? Some people I see lug an auxiliary battery pack around with them for normal usage, let alone in emergency.

    In an emergency situation, just how do you lock down your phone to receive only emergency communications which don't eat battery life? Would these be phone calls, texts, emails? To my mind the best way to do this is to have a separate phone with separate email address. All normal comms will ask you to manually redial/resubmit to the emergency device.

    How do you communicate status out from the disaster-stricken area? A lot of companies use Twitter for this purpose, but what happens when that's down? Perhaps it's time to revisit NNTP.

    1. keithpeter
      Coat

      Re: ...advising customers to keep their phone batteries charged...

      "To my mind the best way to do this is to have a separate phone with separate email address."

      I'd just swap my SIM card into the old Blackberry 7230. Still has a 5 day battery life and does email (just re-authenticate the email address) as well as phone/sms. Can trickle charge off USB wherever you can find another device with some juice.

      Disclaimer: I'm in mild, slightly damp UK

      1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

        Re: ...advising customers to keep their phone batteries charged...

        >I'd just swap my SIM card into the old Blackberry 7230.

        If you only need it to call 999 (or 911) you don't need a sim.

      2. Pompous Git Silver badge
        Happy

        Re: ...advising customers to keep their phone batteries charged...

        Disclaimer: I'm in mild, slightly damp UK

        Where of course snow is just a thing of the past presumably making UK datacentres immune from this kind of disaster.

        However, the warming is so far manifesting itself more in winters which are less cold than in much hotter summers. According to Dr David Viner, a senior research scientist at the climatic research unit (CRU) of the University of East Anglia, within a few years winter snowfall will become “a very rare and exciting event”.

        “Children just aren’t going to know what snow is,” he said.

        From The Independent 20 March 2000

        1. jonathanb Silver badge

          Re: ...advising customers to keep their phone batteries charged...

          Well yes, but a couple of meters of water on the roads is getting much more common, and is much harder to deal with.

          1. Steve Evans

            Re: ...advising customers to keep their phone batteries charged...

            "Well yes, but a couple of meters of water on the roads is getting much more common, and is much harder to deal with."

            You're just not shovelling fast enough!

        2. Mark 85 Silver badge
          Coat

          Re: ...advising customers to keep their phone batteries charged...

          Very true according to El Reg. It seems there was an article here just recently about you chaps having weather suitable for raising hippopotami.

          Icon ----> Chilly and rainy here in the PNW of the US.

    2. jake Silver badge

      Re: ...advising customers to keep their phone batteries charged...

      This kind of situation requires survival, not !GooMyFaceYouMSTwit.

      Stressing on your connectivity is contra indicated.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: ...advising customers to keep their phone batteries charged...

        Do you know phones can be used for other things, e.g. call to see if a friend or loved one is OK or (hope you don't need) call for help?

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: ...advising customers to keep their phone batteries charged...

          > This kind of situation requires survival

          Survival in America: Get to the next 7/11 when roads are blocked.

          1. jake Silver badge

            Re: ...advising customers to keep their phone batteries charged...

            "Get to the next 7/11 when roads are blocked."

            This yank hasn't visited a 7-11 in over 45 years. HTH.

        2. jake Silver badge

          Re: ...advising customers to keep their phone batteries charged...

          "call to see if a friend or loved one is OK"

          Thus overloading the already stressed system, and becoming a part of the problem. I mean, seriously, what could you do if they were in trouble in such a scenario anyway?

    3. TechnicalBen Silver badge

      Re: ...advising customers to keep their phone batteries charged...

      Most phones can work for over a week when turned off.

      It's more worrying that water damage would get them in a real disaster situation.

      But turning it on, then off, ever hour or so may be enough. Or a "endurance" mode and not using Facebook should be fine for receiving emergency communications.

      And by "emergency" I mean the life and death type. The business call can wait...

      1. Steve Evans

        Re: ...advising customers to keep their phone batteries charged...

        "Most phones can work for over a week when turned off."

        They'll hold charge much longer than that if kept within their recommended temperature range... i.e. don't leave it on a cold window ledge (or snow drift), the battery won't like it.

        Just turning off data will increase the life significantly, although I suspect most won't know how to switch their phone to "phone only" mode, but as you say, the ultimate solution is to have the phone charged, and off, or at least airline mode... Turn the cell radios back on when you need to use it for an emergency.

        If you're worried about relatives and friends, you could always arrange set times to check in, and leave the phone in low power mode for a majority of the time.

        Also, charge the laptop... They're a useful source of USB power to recharge your phone. As are most modern cars, or even old ones with lighter socket adapters.

        Although having said all that, personally I'd want to prioritise that I have a way of preparing hot food/drink if the electrics went out more than the phone!

        - Yup, I own a couple of paraffin (kerosene) primus stoves :-D

        Stay safe people.

      2. Voyna i Mor Silver badge

        Re: ...advising customers to keep their phone batteries charged...

        "It's more worrying that water damage would get them in a real disaster situation."

        The disaster will have to get all three of our Sonys, then. The first one was bought to replace a waterproof Sonim which paid several visits to deep puddles. And they have a "Stamina" mode.

        In the UK (and the US based on Apple sales) water resistance and long battery life don't seem to be perceived as important.

    4. JimboSmith Silver badge

      Re: ...advising customers to keep their phone batteries charged...

      I've got a spare phone that I keep with a charged battery strapped to it in a bag with other essentials (such as cash, radio, AA batteries, energy bars etc.) which I can grab in an emergency if I have to leave the house. My smartphone has an ultra power saving mode (Samsung) which does what it says on the tin and shuts down most functions. I have a spare USB battery pack and cables to keep the phone charged when running low. I've also got enough tinned and dried food to last about a week. Having said all that I've sat through the odd hurricane and seriously bad weather on the eastern Atlantic seaboard in the US and I know it pays to be prepared.

  3. jake Silver badge

    Uh ...

    Whatever happened to N+1 data centers for important shit?

    Oh. Never mind. The bean-counters. Marketing and management. My bad.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Uh ...

      The company I toil for is large enough to be able to afford/need multiple datacenters. All our critical applications are architected to be either active-active across two or more datacenters, or have the ability to rapidly fail over.

      That said, we still regularly conduct generator tests, we ensure our diesel tanks are topped up, and for this event we have ensured our DC-area datacenter is prepared for staff to shelter-in-place for as long as needed.

      It is not a case of either-or; you do both.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Uh ...

        "The company I toil for is large enough to be able to afford/need multiple datacenters. All our critical applications are architected to be either active-active across two or more datacenters, or have the ability to rapidly fail over."

        How quaint. Got any jobs going, for people who know how stuff like that is done, and aren't so up to speed on shiny DevOpsOnRails or whatever next weeks trend is?

      2. jake Silver badge

        Re: Uh ...

        "we ensure our diesel tanks are topped up"

        The question is, do you ensure the H2O is drained out of the bottom?

        1. Kernel

          Re: Uh ...

          "he question is, do you ensure the H2O is drained out of the bottom?"

          Why would you do this - in all the installations I've seen (and that's quite a few over 40 years in the telco business) the fuel is lifted from the bulk tank to a ready tank - sometimes referred to as the day tank - and then passes through a number of water separators immediately before being allowed anywhere near an injector pump. The water separators are typically mounted beside or on the engine itself. You never, ever, assume there is no water any diesel tank.

          If you're silly enough to operate a diesel - any diesel, big or small - without any form of water separator then you deserve to have it grind to an expensive halt.

          You'd know all this if you'd ever owned a diesel car, or indeed ever operated any diesel at all, from a little single cylinder portable up to the largest ship's engine..

  4. Bill M

    A nice cup of tea

    A stove powered by bottled gas is essential so one can be sure of having a nice cup of tea during the panic meetings about why the contingency power has failed.

    1. et tu, brute?
      Coat

      Re: A nice cup of tea

      Coffee for me please... you can keep the tea!

      >> Mine's the one with the packet of ground coffee and a cafetière in the (big) pockets...

    2. Stoneshop Silver badge
      Coat

      Re: A nice cup of tea

      A stove powered by bottled gas

      Be aware that butane stays liquid when below zero Celcius, so you either need to have a butane/propane mix (or pure propane), or you switch to an MSR/Primus/Jewel/Trangia.

      Regarding making tea, or coffee, you cannot be too prepared.

      (the fleece-lined one, ta)

      1. Pompous Git Silver badge

        Re: A nice cup of tea

        Be aware that butane stays liquid when below zero Celcius, so you either need to have a butane/propane mix (or pure propane), or

        use a wood burning cookstove that also acts as a space heater and services your hot water needs. Having your own woodlot helps. And it's cheap. Bosky (Thermo Rossi) make excellent stoves.

    3. Voyna i Mor Silver badge

      Re: A nice cup of tea

      For ultimate stove reliability, since there are potential problems with bottled gas, nothing beats a Dometic meths powered stove. Get the meths from the local agricultural suppliers. Smells a bit in use but you always know how much fuel you have and it's virtually idiot proof.

  5. allthecoolshortnamesweretaken Silver badge

    Checklist

    Big boxes of pot nodles*, Mars bars, fizzy drinks and tea.

    And some blankets to build a fort in mission control.

    Sorted.

    *You did stock up on fuel for the generator, didn't you?

    1. Ali Um Bongo
      Thumb Up

      Big boxes of pot nodles

      One simply adores Pot Nodles. But, one has to say, one almost prefers Cup-O-Soaps.

      1. JimboSmith Silver badge

        Re: Big boxes of pot nodles

        I really hope that wasn't a typo. :o) For emergency washing I would hope.

    2. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

      Re: Checklist

      "Mars bars"

      Don't these need a deep fat fryer?

      1. BebopWeBop Silver badge
        Unhappy

        Re: Checklist

        Well they do need a deep fryer in the cold. When I was rather more heavily involved with the UK forces (a long time ago), we had RolLos in our ration packs and not Mars bars. The reason being that you could break off the odd roll and warm it in your mouth in order to eat it. Mars bars froze very solidly, and shattered when a hard implement was used to get them into appropriately sized lumps.

  6. x 7 Silver badge

    these east coast storms usually work their way across the Atlantic after a week or so........any news on whether this one is likely to come across? I'm just debating how many bags of salt to buy

    1. Rusty 1

      Just the one. And a bag of limes and a bottle of Mescal.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Totally based

        I just enjoyed driving down the RAMP OF ICE in the parking building in the middle of Yurop at 02:00 GMT btw.

        Hair-raising but also interesting. Would drive again 10/10. Not sure whether staying in reverse to keep control was really smart or really stupid. I guess it was both - smupid.

        1. x 7 Silver badge

          Re: Totally based

          "Not sure whether staying in reverse to keep control was really smart or really stupid"

          Might just be a valid approach in a rear wheel drive car. In a front wheel drive its suicidally stupid.

          You hoping for a Darwin Award?

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Totally based

            > You hoping for a Darwin Award?

            Dude. Worst that can happen is wreck the car.

            1. x 7 Silver badge

              Re: Totally based

              unexpected things can happen when you wreck cars....

      2. Pompous Git Silver badge
        Happy

        a bottle of Mescal.

        There ya go! And I thought mescaline came as buttons. Carlos Castenada would be pleased :-)

        The trick is in what one emphasizes. We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves happy. The amount of work is the same.

  7. Alister Silver badge

    Travelling advice

    The Royal Automobile Club are advising that the following items should be carried at all times when travelling in severe winter conditions:

    Ice scraper and de-icer

    Torch and spare batteries - or a wind-up torch

    Warm clothes and blankets - for you and all passengers

    Boots

    First aid kit

    Jump start cables

    Food and a warm drink in a thermos

    Shovel

    Reflective warning sign

    Road atlas

    Sunglasses - the glare off the snow can be dazzling

    Mobile phone charger

    ...

    I looked a right twat trying to get on the bus this morning...

    1. Destroy All Monsters Silver badge

      Re: Travelling advice

      What, no Dragunova and two boxes of 7.62×54?

    2. Captain DaFt

      Re: Travelling advice

      @Alister:

      And now I'm in too much pain (Ow,My sides!), and weak from laughter to go out and brave the elements. Kudos, Sir!

    3. Sandtitz Silver badge

      Re: Travelling advice @Alister

      "Reflective warning sign"

      Is that not already mandatory car equipment in Britain?

      1. Alister Silver badge

        Re: Travelling advice @Alister

        "Reflective warning sign"

        Is that not already mandatory car equipment in Britain?

        There is NO compulsory equipment requirement in the UK in regards to cars, although a steering wheel is recommended...

    4. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Travelling advice (RAC "be prepared" list)

      Four years or so ago I was trying to get Burghfield just before Christmas, and it unexpectedly(?) snowed a little in the south of England. Some parts coped better than others.

      I needed to get off the M4 where it meets the A4 (J12). The off ramp slopes up, and there was minimal movement for an hour or so. There's a view of the roundabout/rotary from below and traffic was moving much faster there than on the off ramp.

      Once I was safely onto the ramp I got out of my car and walked up towards the top of the ramp to ask the driver of a brand new Scania five axle job that was blocking the off ramp to all but the smallest+bravest vehicles whether he'd got a snow shovel. He had no snow shovel. Good job I had one then.

      So I got my shovel out of my car and he dug out enough snow to get his otherwise-immobilised shiny truck out of the way. I don't know or care whether he got all the way up the ramp, but at least he was no longer blocking hundreds of other people. Utter tosspot.

      So, as the RAC rightly says, "be prepared". Even if you don't need these things yourself, they may come in handy in other ways.

      Also please STAY OFF THE PHONE EXCEPT FOR IMPORTANT MESSAGES.

      The cellphone networks are not designed to cope with a stationary motorway, and your extended chat may end up blocking a call which actually matters (e.g. a call for lfiesaving emergency assistance).

      Thank you.

      1. Long John Brass Silver badge

        Re: Travelling advice (RAC "be prepared" list)

        > ....snow shovel. He had no snow shovel. Good job I had one then.

        Every time I get pulled over, the police get very excitable if they find a shovel in the boot of my car

        1. Mark 85 Silver badge

          Re: Travelling advice (RAC "be prepared" list)

          As long as all they find is the shovel, all will be ok. It's the carpet roll, duct (gaffer's) tape, and quick lime that really sets them off.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Travelling advice (RAC "be prepared" list)

        "the driver of a brand new Scania five axle job that was blocking the off ramp to all but the smallest+bravest vehicles whether he'd got a snow shovel"

        He should have watched 'Ice Road Truckers'

        Be prepared people. It's a Snowpocalypse

        1. JamesPond
          FAIL

          Re: Travelling advice (RAC "be prepared" list)

          Is it really snowpocalypse? We had 5ft snow fall over 2 days in north east UK in December 2010, I still managed to drive 120 miles to a job interview. The most difficult part was the first 100 meters to the main road that took me 4 hours to dig the car out. The other 120 miles took 2 hours! And I got the job.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: Travelling advice (I live in Buffalo, NY USA and you are all..)

            a bunch of wimps in Baltimore, Washington and NYC.

            Try a regularly occurring (at least once a year) snowstorm with 70 plus inches of snowfall in snowbelts, 30 plus inches in less active areas. Most of us got where we were going that day and if we didn't, we had the tools and intelligence to get someplace safe. The ones that were left got help from our police, fire and citizens. I drove hundreds of miles to Syracuse and back in the last one until that moron in Albany closed the Thruway and stranded even more people.

            The only one that really put a crimp in our style was the Blizzard of '77 when there were drifts greater than 30 ft tall. I drove delivery truck that day and made all my deliveries but once dark fell had to shelter in a Fire Hall as there was no traveling. Thousands were stranded at work or at home.

            Oh, and we have quite enough smarts to not build our backup generator systems where it floods all the time.

      3. Seajay#

        Re: Travelling advice (RAC "be prepared" list)

        "The cellphone networks are not designed to cope with a stationary motorway, and your extended chat may end up blocking a call which actually matters (e.g. a call for lfiesaving emergency assistance)."

        Not true. 999 calls will boot off standard calls from the cell.

        To a certain kind of mind the obvious implication of that is that if you find you are unable to get through at a very busy period, you could call 999, hang up as soon as it connects then dial the number you actually wanted.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Travelling advice (RAC "be prepared" list)

          "999 calls will boot off standard calls from the cell."

          I'm well aware of the theory, thank you. I even know that 112 should work without a valid SIM for the network, so long as there's coverage.

          I'm also well aware that stuff like this doesn't always work as specified.

          "you could call 999, hang up as soon as it connects then dial the number you actually wanted."

          The odds won't be in your favour.

          If people don't *need* to be on the phone in these circumstances, they should do everyone else a favour - say what needs to be said, and then let someone else have their turn.

          Or is that too much like communism to be acceptable round here?

  8. Sandtitz Silver badge

    Phone towers?

    "AT&T said it would be equipping its phone towers in the area with backup batteries"

    Uh, where I live every cell phone tower has backup batteries to enable emergency calls during power outages. Are there not similar requiments for carriers in the US?

  9. chivo243 Silver badge
    Coat

    Mandatory Training

    Everybody gets a choice, either you go to Chicago, or Buffalo, NY for one winter of training. I remember the Blizzard of '79 in Chicago, man that was fun, a week of no school, we could walk on top of the snow drifts to the top of the garage!

    My coat is the parka with the dog whistle, gotta call my St Bernard somehow...

  10. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Snow?

    What's that?

    - Western Australia

  11. Valarian

    Being out in the snow 'officially against the law'

    When it snows in London:

    UK: Argh transport systems hosed, yay snow day!

    US: Hah you Brits can't handle severe weather LMAO!!1

    When it snows in NYC:

    US: MARTIAL LAW MOTHERF*CKERS!

    UK: WTF dude??

    http://www.wnd.com/2016/01/martial-law-declared-in-new-york-city/

    1. Dan Paul

      Re: Being out in the snow 'officially against the law'

      Because the "Mayor" and the entire NYC government are wimpy and ineffectual idiots and morons who shouldn't have been given drivers license's; let alone allowed to vote or govern. Those "decree's" have cost NYS millions of dollars in lost productivity and not resulted in any safer behavior.

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