back to article Ice cold: How hard man of storage made Everest climb look easy

It’s terrifyingly real, so true to life you are convinced the climbers are there, actually crossing the aluminium ladder bridge, poised above the terrifying drop of a Khumbu Glacier’s ice-fall crevasse in Everest’s Western Cwm. Yet the actors actually clambered across a ladder bridge poised above rubber matting in the UK’s …

  1. AndyS

    Excellent write up. It brings to mind the sketch from That Mitchell & Webb Sound about Doctor Who:

    Not really worth it all, is it?

  2. Pascal Monett Silver badge
    Thumb Up

    "It’s just somebody else’s data centre"

    Words to be spoken aloud when the Cloud is being hyped. Every time.

  3. -v(o.o)v-

    Great article Chris, one of your best. But maybe one day you will learn to turn off the wavy lines of spell checker from the diagrams...

    1. Jan 0

      Upvote or Downvote?

      Upvote for the great article.

      Downvote for Infortrend for abuse of English. No wonder the spell checker is embarrassed.

  4. Speltier

    Freelancers

    Where do these freelancers go after the work is done? Are they just visiting Iceland on a work visa, or do they make enough to sit by a fireplace practicing their skills unpaid till the next job? (considering that the article had a lot of emphasis on "that solution was too expensive", one would think pay was not extremely high for the workers)

  5. Dale Lafferty
    Thumb Up

    Great business solution for a cost sensitive market

    Excellent story - More in line with what business professionals need to improve productivity and meet challenging cost constraints

  6. si 4

    8 to 12 hours to render per frame? That's over a million hours for the film!

    Interesting seeing the hardware and workflow needed behind stuff like his and the previous F1 article.

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