back to article Israel joins EU in spiking Safe Harbour

Menlo Park Road’s VCs at first sniffed at the consequences of the Schrems v Facebook case on Silicon Valley’s global ambitions, but they should seriously be looking at how their investments conduct business. The global Silicon Valley freeze-out continues to spread, with Israel’s data protection authority ILITA declaring …

  1. msknight Silver badge

    So, this isn't going to bode well for the peace talk attempts, then, I guess.

  2. John Savard Silver badge

    Wording

    The United States certainly can guarantee the privacy of Israeli citizens' data on servers in the U.S..

    It's private corporations operating such servers that can't guarantee the privacy of data because the laws allow the government to insist that it be handed over.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Wording

      "The United States certainly can guarantee the privacy of Israeli citizens' data on servers in the U.S.."

      Is that an attempt at humour, or you are really that poorly informed? Perhaps you need to

      Bing some examples like Sony and Ashley Madison....

    2. Naselus

      Re: Wording

      "The United States certainly can guarantee the privacy of Israeli citizens' data on servers in the U.S.."

      Sony pictures called; they say that's just not true.

      1. Vic

        Re: Wording

        "The United States certainly can guarantee the privacy of Israeli citizens' data on servers in the U.S.."

        Sony pictures called; they say that's just not true.

        Well, if we believe the US authorities, they know it was North Korea that attacked Sony because they had already infiltrated NK's networks, and watched the attack taking place.

        So the US could have prevented the attack if they had chosen to do so. One can only wonder at their choice to allow it, given that they gave up any secrecy they might have had almost immediately afterwards.

        Unless, of course, they're just lying.

        Vic.

    3. Pascal Monett Silver badge
      Trollface

      Re: Wording

      The United States certainly can guarantee the privacy of Israeli citizens' data on NSA servers in the U.S

      FTFY

      1. Mark 85 Silver badge

        @Pascal -- Re: Wording

        The United States certainly can guarantee the privacy of Israeli citizens' data on NSA servers in the U.S

        FTFY

        How would we know that they haven't already been ripped open? It's not like they or any other TLA or FLA in any country would admit it.

    4. LDS Silver badge

      Re: Wording

      Just like they protected their own citizens data on OPM servers?

  3. alain williams Silver badge

    Only fine words so far ...

    this declaration (and the recent one of the EU) will only have any meaning when USA companies are prohibited from taking our data out of the EU - in a way that really stops them; also when local companies and organisations are really stopped from moving data to the USA.

    Until then - it is all just hot air.

  4. John Jennings

    Only way I see it....

    Is a complete rollback of the legislation the US put in place to sucker the rest of the world. FISA courts, the rest. The only way its going to show faith is to dismantle some of the NSA budget too... So its never going to happen.

    The NSA broke the internet :(

    1. Vic

      Re: Only way I see it....

      The NSA broke the internet :(

      Not so. The NSA merely broke American Internet companies.

      We keep hearing about the Internet routing around damage. And it seems to be doing so. Things might be a little more expensive (in cash terms, not overall) for a little while - US hosting is very cheap - but even that is probably onlt a transient situation.

      Vic.

      1. Captain DaFt

        Re: Only way I see it....

        I'd say it's more: The NSA broke the US Government's total access to the World's use of the internet.

    2. big_D Silver badge

      Re: Only fine words so far ...

      The problem is, the US companies have to stop transferring data immediately, or they put their customers at risk.

      If they are caught moving data out of the EU, it is the owners of the data (private citizens who trusted their contact data to GMail, Outlook.com, iCloud etc. or European businesses using cloud services) who will pay. They have a care of duty to ensure the data is held within EU data protection regulations. If their cloud hosting provider suddenly exports that data out of the EU without the backing of Safe Harbor, then they face fines and / or imprisonment.

      The cloud providers will also face prosecution, but they are big corporations outside the EU, but their customers are within the EU.

  5. Your alien overlord - fear me

    Controversal solution - all US companies store ALL data (including US data) in the EU. Problem solved before said molehill becomes said mountain.

    Obviously the NSA will force Congress to say no but if the US companies want to harvest our personal data....

    1. Vic

      Controversal solution - all US companies store ALL data (including US data) in the EU. Problem solved

      Not a solution at all.

      At present, the US believes it can order US companies to turn over any data they hold, wherever that might be. This is the basis of the Microsoft vs. DOJ case.

      So even if US companies did as you suggest, it doesn't solve the problem at all until and unless the US starts to respect local laws. And it'll be lovely to have bacon delivered by air...

      Vic.

      1. big_D Silver badge

        @Vic

        exactly. The companies wouldn't just have to move their data outside of the USA and over to Europe, they would also need to re-incorporate themselves overseas and they would need to close all offices and data centers in the USA and move all of their staff over seas. Only then would they be in the clear.

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