back to article Apple watch breathes down Fitbit's neck

Apple is preparing to haul past Fitbit on sales of wearables after just four months, according to IDC. The fruity firm sold a total of 3.6 million watches in the second quarter, having only released the phone-dependent wristable in April. Apple closed to within 0.8 million units of Fitbit, which has been pumping wearables …

  1. Eddy Ito Silver badge
    WTF?

    such as smart glasses or hearables.

    Aren't smart glasses just another "wearable" and without going into bluetooth headsets, my car is a "hearable". Sounds like marketing droid wants to create yet another superfluous word. Maybe that's what we could call the broader category of these types of toys - superfluousables.

  2. Michael Thibault

    Here we go!

    "You know who I am," he said

    The speaker was an angel

    He coughed and shook his crumpled wings

    Closed his eyes and moved his lips

    "It's time we should be going"

    ...

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    And yet I've STILL not seen a single person wearing an apple watch. Loads of people with fitbits/garmins etc though.

    Maybe people simply aren't replacing them very often once they have them.

    1. Admiral Grace Hopper

      I've seen them in the wild, worn by HR "people" and a vicar. Make of that what you will

      I might be tempted by the heart rate monitor function, but only when its got a similar battery life to my Misfit. Six months between charge or battery change and I'll give it a serious look.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      My MD is sporting one (palm.. face!) and will not STFU about it!

  4. Edwin

    tripe

    A Fitbit isn't comparable to an Apple iSuperfluousness. Or is Cupertino trying to position their not-a-timepiece as an activity tracker now?

    I ask, because for that sort of cash, you should get a Suunto.

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    I have one of said wristjobs.....

    Happily not from my own money but as part of testing for any potential Business value for the company I work for.

    My opinion:

    It's something on my wrist that tells me when I need to look at the thing in my pocket that also demanded attention.....

    The screen is tiny and so won't display an entire e-mail message (even with scrolling). If the message has formatting/pictures then it just won't show it at all...

    It needs charged every night. It barely makes it a good part of the day (6am-9pm) if I use it to track my cycles to/from work. Oh, and it does nothing unless the phone is in range so it's not a valid option to replace my Garmin....

    It's very laggy and unresponsive. Multiple taps for response or multiple glances to "wake" it up to see the clock face.

    When I chose to put my phone away on coming home from work the watch happily stays connected from basement to upper floor...therefore I can't escape the dang thing tapping me telling me something is going on (stand up, you got mail!, your village has been attacked!....aarrgghhh). Think I'll go back to my regular watch that last needed a battery top up 3 years ago...

    Maybe Watch OS 2.0 will make it a better experience with better stand-along capabilities (wifi etc) but I'm predicting a new watch model soon that'll have a GPS sensor to properly compete in the wearables market....

  6. ratfox Silver badge

    Impressive for Fitbit

    It's impressive that they managed to keep their lead on Apple. I'd bet on them keeping that lead. I would say that most of the people who were going to buy an Apple watch bought one already, and the demand for next quarters is going to be lower, until they release a second model. Fitbit, on the other hand, probably is selling the same amount regularly, and did not get a particular bump this quarter.

  7. Nick Pettefar

    Owner

    I have one.

    It's OK

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