back to article BYOD? More like CYOD as companies still set the parameters

Companies are rapidly expanding the volume of mobile devices used by their employees. The number of devices enrolled in business grew by 72 per cent during the whole of last year, compared with 2013. Moreover, a Good Technology survey in the first quarter of 2015 found 72 per cent of those devices ran iOS, 26 per cent Android …

  1. James 51 Silver badge

    Balance from BlackBerry would help deal with some of those issues but it was interesting that it was missing from the list of devices.

  2. hplasm Silver badge
    Facepalm

    Why?

    Why do people insist on letting their company use their kit for nothing - and then dictate how they can use their own kit??

    1. Number6

      Re: Why?

      I refused to allow the Outlook app on my phone. It wanted to be able to do a factory reset on the phone (i.e. wipe it) and I said no. My kit, my rules. At the moment my phone doesn't even use any of the work wifi options - we're supposed to use the guest network but the performance is worse than just using the telco-provided 4G data so I never bothered to set it up on the phone.

      1. therebel

        Re: Why?

        Not just the Outlook app that will be a condition of adding the Exchange account to the phone. Even if you use the stock email so on an Android and add the company Exchange account it will require the factory wipe permission.

        1. Number6

          Re: Why?

          Even if you use the stock email so on an Android and add the company Exchange account it will require the factory wipe permission.

          Interestingly enough, that wasn't the case for me. Using straight IMAP worked without having to agree to anything, so I suspect someone slipped up somewhere. Of course, when I raised the issue of the Outlook factory wipe I was told that of course the company would never do that.

    2. Captain Scarlet Silver badge
      Coat

      Re: Why?

      Because people asked and I assume and the beanies saw a way to reduce costs?

    3. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

      Re: Why?

      >Why do people insist on letting their company use their kit for nothing

      Because the alternative to being able to read company email on your own phone is to drive back into work to check that email on your company computer

      1. Justicesays

        Re: Why?

        Several other alternatives exist. You could not read work emails at home, or your company could provide a device at their expense to allow you to do so...

      2. Jagged

        Re: Why?

        You don't have a browser at home?

      3. VBF

        Re: Why?

        Or better.... when you leave the office, WORK CEASES TO EXIST until you return. It's YOUR life - you just work there for an agreed number of hours per day!

        Or to put it another way..... It's the LIFE-WORK balance, not the other way around!

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    I'd say generally it's "Buy your own device" (sub-text and if you want any help make sure it's apple.)

    I hate it, if the company wants to make having a tablet for meetings, outings, whatever the norm they should provide them tablet.

    I begrudge having to buy decent stationary but I do do so because it gives me a peculiarly large sense of well being compared to how much you'd assume it should do. However buying a tablet (which for most will have a shorter useful life then a 2h pencil) for use at work really gets my goat, I noticed in my office about a fifth of people have iPads. Only the department head got hers from the company. Just grrr grinds my maids.

    What's next, buy your own chair, buy your own computer, if you don't have the money you become the poor kid in class unable to keep up with the people at the top of the twat scale. "Did you see Dave, poor guy, he's only got a zoostrom business machine" "gaphooow"

    1. Velv Silver badge
      Boffin

      "What's next, buy your own chair, buy your own computer,"

      Or "work from home" as it's now known

  4. BlartVersenwaldIII

    Tie Your Own Leash

    I look forward to the day when the same concept is extended to company cars; the company doesn't provide you with one, but expects full control of the car you drive to the office whenever you're not using it. Or when it doesn't think you should be using it. Or when it wants to use it.

    Likewise, your company could make a fortune renting out your home out for the day whilst you're in the office.

    1. Aled Balloon

      Re: Tie Your Own Leash

      I look forward to the day when the same concept is extended to company cars; the company doesn't provide you with one, but expects full control of the car you drive to the office whenever you're not using it. Or when it doesn't think you should be using it. Or when it wants to use it.

      I have already seen this happen - at the last but one place I worked. No company cars or lease scheme, just a car supplement, but you had to buy a car their approved list (although there was no approved supplier list) this was all justified & tied in to the company Green Policy.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Tie Your Own Leash

        The place I am at now has some controls around Car Allowance for age of the vehicle and suchlike and the lease option leaves you paying back 10% over the cost of the car and handing the car back at the end of the lease. Not the end of the world but it is the thin end of the wedge.

        Anon cos despite that I like working here

  5. rcp27

    "Interestingly, privacy seems to be the biggest concern employees have of sharing their device with work – although they got the wrong end of the stick... as many as 70 per cent of employees don’t trust their employer with personal data"

    Sorry, how is this the "wrong end of the stick"? I have little enough faith in my employer's ability to keep its own data secure, and I certainly wouldn't trust it with my personal data, particularly if I ever plan on changing employer in the future.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      I'm not pointing the finger at you

      But aren't you and your fellow employees collectively 'your employer' that you don't trust?

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        @theodore - Re: I'm not pointing the finger at you

        This was the case in a communist regime. Now we know very well there are (disposable) employees and higher hierarchy staff.

  6. DoctorNine

    The real deal

    The main reason BYOD worked for C-Suite personnel, is that you get to have a smaller capitalization budget for upgrading new machines for the grunts. Employees mostly liked this because they get less straightjacketed by feeble machines built to lowest common denominator standards, and thus painful to use when trying to be productive. Enterprises have never relinquished their desire to direct employees' behavior and resources even when they are not at work, though. It's the nature of the beast. The evolution of the workplace has created the BYOD model in order to facilitate that. Of course corporations can't be trusted with employee personal data. Their goals and employees' goals are commonly diametrically opposed.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      @DoctorNine - Re: The real deal

      You're failing to take in consideration the (heavy) marketing push from mobile devices manufacturers.

  7. Anonymous Coward
    Facepalm

    Xora app user

    Rather than uninstalling the Xora app Myrna should have simply turned the iPhone off. Work phone = work hours.

    Failing that, if the phone was viewed as some kind of a perk, surely she could have disabled location settings for the app at clock off time and re-enabled it the following morning?

    1. Notas Badoff

      Re: Xora app user and iPhone owner

      "... after deleting an app (Xora iPhone app) from her own handset ..."

      1. Rick Giles
        FAIL

        Re: Xora app user and iPhone owner

        From the linked article: was fired after uninstalling an app that her employer required her to run constantly on her company issued iPhone

        If the app stopped tracking at clock out, no problem. But on my own time, big problem. I can see her point.

    2. Raphael

      Re: Xora app user

      "Rather than uninstalling the Xora app Myrna should have simply turned the iPhone off. Work phone = work hours."

      From what I can see she was required to be on call 24/7, so turning it off wasn't an option.

      (that's in the legal filing the Arstechnica article links to)

  8. Kevin Johnston

    And what about the third option?

    This also seems to be missing and is normally labelled COPE, Company Owned Personal Enabled. The phone belongs to them but you can load apps and suchlike onto it.

    This tends to need a layer such as Blackberry Balance (mentioned above) or Knox or similar to split the work/personal but it means that when you move on, the phone number (and the clients who use it) stays with the company.

  9. MonkeyCee Silver badge

    Capital cost versus support

    I'm really confused by the concept that any non-standardised device can have lower support costs, unless manglement have found a way to push support onto the users as well. Or are tablets locked down enough that they are either 100% go or 100% fuxed?

    Personally I'll only bring my own kit in when I'm consulting. So if it's work kit, it's paid for (one way or another) by work.

    As for "my home IT is better than work IT" of course it is, more money has been spent on it. Same for anything else you care about, because your purchase criteria was about your own use, versus a general use case. Hence soft toilet paper and nice coffee at home, sandpaper and cat's piss at work. If you get something that you'd be happy with at home then it's a perk.

    Same goes for working from home. If you've been persuaded that using your own kit and utilities is a benefit for you, then good work by the marketing department :) Again, consulting is fine, because I get some tax breaks for doing it, hence the business (in this case my own) is paying for it.

    What next, BYOTP?

    1. Pascal Monett Silver badge

      I absolutely agree. I want my personal equipment to be better than my work equipment. The day my company gets me a better PC than I have at home is . . well, never.

      If the company requires that I have something (ie phone), the company pays for it. If the company can't pay for it, there's no law saying I have to. I'm quite happy to separate my personal equipment from company equipment. Avoids all the hassle of who's got whose data.

  10. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    own kit

    I brought my own kit to work. The contract-company provided hardware was five years old and its lack of power was affecting my performance. So, I brought my own hardware in. It is an oddball computer, that nobody else has. I keep it locked up 'cause I'm afraid that an underpaid full time employee is going to scarf it ...

  11. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Good Technology

    I disagree

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