back to article TITSUP: Apple Music, App Stores, iCloud, iTunes, Radio, iBooks

Apple's web stores, music-streaming jukeboxes, and cloud services have been struggling to stay online for the past three hours. As of 0959 PT (1659 UTC), Apple's status page is still reporting partial outages for the iOS and OS X App Stores and Apple TV, as well as the iTunes services, Apple Music, and Radio. The systems fell …

  1. adnim Silver badge
    Meh

    I hadn't noticed

    I buy content in the form of CD's It can't then be deleted from the media/devices I then choose to transfer it too.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: I hadn't noticed

      Also nobody's going to slip a crappy U2 CD onto your shelf while you're not looking, and damage your street cred.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: I hadn't noticed

      Copying CDs to music players is illegal in the UK. You have to buy the same content again or face 10 years in jail in the UK.

      1. Test Man

        Re: I hadn't noticed

        "Copying CDs to music players is illegal in the UK. You have to buy the same content again or face 10 years in jail in the UK."

        Technically yes but in total reality the police and the authorities aren't going to give a shit. If you're someone who does it on a massive scale and makes it available to others, however, obviously it's a different story, but they aren't in the least bit interested in private individuals copying their own collection or even their mate's collection.

      2. adnim Silver badge
        Holmes

        @AC Re: I hadn't noticed

        "Copying CDs to music players is illegal in the UK. You have to buy the same content again or face 10 years in jail in the UK."

        Not sure if you are being sarcastic or not.

        However.. Thank you for the advice and ensuring my future liberty.... Deleting gigabytes of flac and mp3 now. </genuine sarcasm>

      3. James O'Shea

        Re: I hadn't noticed

        "Copying CDs to music players is illegal in the UK. You have to buy the same content again or face 10 years in jail in the UK."

        I've been copying my music onto formats I like for well over 40 years now. If someone actually wanted to try to prosecute because I moved to a different format, despite my having a truly large collection of CDs and vinyl LPs plus the equipment necessary to turn them into digitalised formats, I'd say for 'em to come get me.

        It is true that I haven't bought much music lately. Current music tends to annoy me, so I listen to my older stuff.

    3. James O'Shea

      Re: I hadn't noticed

      "I buy content in the form of CD's It can't then be deleted from the media/devices I then choose to transfer it too."

      Sigh. With (some) books and with movies you might have a point. Not with music. From the very first versions of iTunes (back when iTunes was actually usable...) it was entirely possible to ensure that your purchased content couldn't be remotely deleted. (Step 1: download content. Step 2: set up a playlist. Step 3: burn a CD or otherwise copy the playlist. Step 4: put the copied content back into iTunes. Or, indeed, into anything which would play said content. Apple would be completely unable to delete that content. Until iTunes Match arrived, Apple wouldn't even know that content existed. And, yes, if the music was DRMed at the start, it's not DRMed anymore. From the beginning iTunes could burn up to seven copies of any playlist, and the copies would NOT be DRMed. You'd think that Apple was deliberately trying to sabotage the music companies, and you'd be correct.)

      I don't usually get books from Apple; virtually all of my ebooks are acquired from other sources, converted to epubs (if necessary) and had their metadata massaged in calibre, and then moved to iBooks and iTunes strictly so that said ebooks may be viewed on my iPad. calibre doesn't touch DRMed content, so I don't, either, unless I absolutely have no choice. Those few ebooks I have from Apple (and Amazon, via Kindle) are copied over to calibre, too. (I prefer the iBooks reader on my iPad to the Kindle reader for iOS. I suspect that Amazon has deliberately crippled it, and their readers for OS X and Window, to try to get users to get a Kindle. That, or the Kindle interface is just truly crappy.) This means that I usually have at least two copies of any book, one in calibre and one in iBooks. And Apple can't do a damn thing to the calibre copy. (Neither can Amazon.)

      It should be noted that there are ways to deDRM almost all ebooks, should I absolutely have to do that... and I have done exactly that. This means that I have several hand-built epubs sitting in calibre and usually in iBooks. Neither Apple nor Amazon have any idea that I have them, and so they cannot delete them.

      Movies I don't know about. I usually use my Amazon Prime membership to access free (well, free after I pay for a year of Amazon Prime, which I would be doing anyway just for the free 2nd-day-air shipping) content and I simply don't care one way or another, as it's streaming content and doesn't live on my drives anyway. Movies and videos that I want to keep, such as my complete collection of every single episode of Farscape, are MKVs parked far, far, FAR way from iTunes. I don't even know if iTunes can handle MKVs, I've never tried.

      1. g e

        Re: I hadn't noticed

        Does that mean you're recommending burning it to CD to rip it back again ?

        Buying a CD sounds way less faff.

  2. Frank Bough

    So that explains it..

    I was fiddling with Apple Music an hour ago and it was being monumentally slow, working fine now.

    1. returnmyjedi

      Re: So that explains it..

      You have my condolences.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: So that explains it..

      Remember, It's Apple, It just works

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: So that explains it..

        Remember, It's Apple, It just works

        Just slower ..

  3. Irongut

    Total Inability To Provide Usual Purchases

    TITPUP?

    Should be 'Total Inability To Supply Usual Purchases'

    1. Steve Foster
      Joke

      Re: Total Inability To Provide Usual Purchases

      Ah, but Apple are a family-friendly organisation, and don't allow such in their ecosystem.

      We need a backronym for mammaryglandup...

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Total Inability To Provide Usual Purchases

        We need a backronym for mammaryglandup...

        Nice to see you're keeping abreast of possible alternatives, but I'm not sure that one would stick. It's a bit too much of a mouthful.

    2. diodesign (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

      Re: Total Inability To Provide Usual Purchases

      Yeah, I fucked up.

      C.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Total Inability To Provide Usual Purchases

        Speaking of stuffups, is it odd to anyone else that this is about Apple's software, yet the screenshot is of the Tomahawk media player running on Ubuntu?

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    The Cloud

    Somebody elses computers you have no control over

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: The Cloud

      To paraphrase someone, "No cloud, no cry. No Clou-oud, no cry."

      Billions of dollars every quarter, but still not as robust as the free TPB. That's what Americans call "success."

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Never mind the tits up

    How in Xena's name you get "Leonardo" (an annoying Brazilian country singer) and Angel (who?) when you search for Pink Floyd?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Never mind the tits up

      To be fair, some of the young people they have working for them may have never heard of Pink Floyd, instead listening to some heathenous rabble they call "music".

  6. Dan 55 Silver badge
    FAIL

    And this is the thing HomeKit is going to be connected to?

    So much for that idea.

  7. M_W
    FAIL

    Apple Music's been broken for a while

    It looks like something is very wrong with the DNS entries for Apple Music and a chunk of apple's back end.

    Google's DNS (and Sky's DNS too) seem to be reporting the wrong hostnames for large swathes of Apple's estate. Apple themselves are telling people to use Norton Connectsafe DNS servers which do work (I was able to get Apple Music to work fine once I forced my home PC to use the Norton DNS servers rather Google (my usual default) or the standard Sky DNS that comes with the fibre service).

    May well be something to do with Akamai - as it randomly works and randomly doesn't.

    Not great for a service which, as you all will quote 'should just work'.

    Well, it obviously just doesn't. :)

  8. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Smarmy PR talk

    "Users are experiencing a problem with the services listed above. We are investigating and will update the status as more information becomes available."

    That's like saying there being a fire in a theatre and announcing "Theater goers are experiencing problems with smoke inhalation and severe burns, we are investigating and will update the status as more information becomes available:"

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