back to article Swedish Supreme Court keeps AssangeTM in Little Ecuador

Sweden's Supreme Court has decided not to let Julian Assange discontinue his ongoing attempt to extend the world couch-surfing record. The five-judge court yesterday released a decision (PDF) on Assange's application to have his arrest warrant quashed. Assange's legal team argued that his ongoing residence in London's …

  1. ratfox Silver badge
    Angel

    Still looking forward to…

    The day he's finally shipped off to Sweden, where he's sentenced to a month of community service.

    1. Lee D Silver badge

      Re: Still looking forward to…

      Before or after spending six months in a British jail for skipping bail and resisting arrest?

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Still looking forward to…

      The day he's finally shipped off to Sweden, where he's sentenced to a month of community service.

      I heard rumours the Swedish people were now indeed coming to the UK. That could be interesting, because if he is indeed convicted in absentia after that interview the Ecuadorians will be actively harbouring a criminal. Not sure how well that one will go down in the annals of diplomatic history, but I have a feeling in that embassy is yet another person who is regretting the day they befriended St Jules. So, in short, you may have your wish soon. It's about time too.

      Assange's legal team argued that his ongoing residence in London's Ecuadorian embassy is a disproportionate response to the investigation into his alleged crimes.

      LOL - this shows a serious degree of desperation. The Swedes had nothing to do with that, so it won't influence matters one iota. That St Jules decided to bolt is not their problem, even less so that the embassy was stupid enough to abuse the asylum process.

      1. Scorchio!!

        Re: Still looking forward to…

        They already are harbouring an offender, albeit not convicted; he has skipped bail in this country.

    3. Cliff

      Re: Still looking forward to…

      ...where he's sentenced to a month of community service...

      For him, the only thing worse would be 2 weeks community service - remember this isn't about whatever it's about, it's about Assange being terrified of being irrelevant after all.

      1. Mark 85 Silver badge
        Devil

        Re: Still looking forward to…

        Then maybe no sentence except a gag-order on the press to never, ever mention his name again. Add.. maybe orders to Google to never-ever show a hit if some searches his name. What could be worse then to be an un-person?

  2. msknight Silver badge

    Flight?

    Honestly! Where to? Off the sofa and on to the armchair?

  3. Alister Silver badge

    What! Hasn't he finished digging a tunnel from the Ecuadorian Embassy to the Thames with a teaspoon yet?

    1. msknight Silver badge

      I heard he tried it, but made the mistake of starting from the first floor and ended up in the lobby. His hosts were not impressed according to reports...

    2. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge
      Coat

      Hasn't he finished digging a tunnel from the Ecuadorian Embassy to the Thames

      He tried. It leaked.

      1. Cliff

        ... And so he started a wiki site about it.

        Don't you find sites get off-topic rather quickly ;)

  4. Anonymous Coward
    WTF?

    What?

    "Assange's legal team argued that his ongoing residence in London's Ecuadorian embassy is a disproportionate response to the investigation into his alleged crimes."

    So leave !

    1. Velv Silver badge
      Mushroom

      Re: What?

      The "dispropotionate response" Is by Assange to the issuance of an arrest warrant and it is nothing to do with Sweden or its courts. It was his choice to go to Ecuador to continue to evade arrest, and no matter how noble the cause, let's not forget that he has chosen to evade arrest.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      WTF?

      Re: What?

      Please someone explain the down votes (the single one I get, always get at least one).

      Please explain HOW it's Sweden's fault he is in an Embassy?

      1. Scorchio!!

        Re: What?

        "Please someone explain the down votes (the single one I get, always get at least one).

        Please explain HOW it's Sweden's fault he is in an Embassy?"

        It happens to me also and I consider it to be a badge of honour that, for citing facts, I elicit disapproval; it demonstrates how out of touch with the truth these people are; it occurs, not because they have some superb a priori argument against you, based on laws and morals, and no one has yet offered any coherent argument about the alleged rapey-man whose followers appear to accord him some latter day Neo status.

        As to Julie himself, he absconded from Sweden (soon after his lawyer was informed the police wanted to interview and then arrest him as per Swedish legal practise, thereby causing his lawyer's professional society to interview him), having prior made it clear he wanted to reside there - it being that he felt safe from the US - but now feels they have banana republic justice, even though they subscribe to the same legal standards/ECHR/HRA that the Brits (for the while at least) do, and then locked himself in a a Latinate closet.

        Julie's Knightsbridge balcony scenes were amusing, a sign of desperate manipulation. Not long now. Soon he'll need either a medical or dental operation that will require him to leave the building. He can be assured of an excellent escort, a clear route, and people at the point of treatment who will guard and protect him. Unless of course he chooses to have a sordid death in the closet. I'm sure the NHS won't mind this single instance of health tourism. ;-)

        Please arrow this post down. I want to see as many down arrows as possible. Thank you.

        1. Khaptain Silver badge

          Re: What?

          "Please arrow this post down. I want to see as many down arrows as possible. Thank you."

          Had to oblige .... boring afternoon......................... . . . . . . . . . .

      2. Swarthy Silver badge
        Holmes

        Re: What?

        Well, what else does Assange™ have to do while holed-up in the Embassy? He's reading articles about himself and down-voting the comments he disagrees with (the ones that call him out/call him names, mainly).

  5. James Ashton

    Statute of Limitations

    I understand that there's a clock ticking in Sweden so Assange doesn't have long to wait to forget about that mess due to a statue of limitations on his alleged crimes. His real problem will remain in the UK where he's clearly skipped bail.

    1. LucreLout Silver badge

      Re: Statute of Limitations

      I understand that there's a clock ticking in Sweden so Assange doesn't have long to wait to forget about that mess due to a statue of limitations

      I still don't believe that the clock can be counted as running down when you're deliberately fleeing from justice and obfuscating the investigation of the crime.

      As I've said before, it surely can't be the right that you could visit Sweden, get all rapey with the natives, then return home. When they don't find you for a few years, because they have no idea where in the world you are, you get off free as a bird? I just don't buy that. If, however, it is true, then Sweden should be urgently looing towards reforming its judicial process.

      1. Gordon 10 Silver badge

        Re: Statute of Limitations

        As I understand it - that Statute of limitations only applies to SOME of the charges that AssHat faces, not the most serious ones.

        1. Robert Helpmann?? Silver badge
          Childcatcher

          Re: Statute of Limitations

          While I am not sure how the statute of limitations would be applied under Swedish law, I am curious as to whether he could be charged and tried in absentia. At least in a generic sense, the limitation is on the time between the crime and a person being charged with it. If he has been charged, I would think there would no longer be a ticking clock in that sense.

    2. Scorchio!!

      Re: Statute of Limitations

      No, once the CJS has made its initial attempts to apprehend and charge the suspect the statute of limitations is irrelevant, since the man has become an offender by virtue of absconding.

    3. AnotherBird
      FAIL

      Re: Statute of Limitations

      Statute of limitation is a legal mechanism to force the prosecution and complainant to be diligent. The clock can stop clicking for a number of reasons. All those reasons are because of actions by the accused.

  6. Spasticus Autisticus
    Mushroom

    'Assange's layers' - how many layers? I think we should be told.

    1. M7S
      Coat

      re: Assange's Layers

      That's why it's called The Onion Router

    2. Lee D Silver badge

      More seriously - who's paying the lawyers?

      Because I'm assuming that, apart from the odd media interview, Assange isn't in full time employment or education. Presumably, the same people who bailed him out (which out worked really well!), or he's receiving funding from Wikileaks etc.?

      Who's paying his day-to-day expenses while he's in the embassy? And who's funding these lawyers (plural)? And, secondly, they aren't actually very good at what they do (I mean, it's hard when your client is on the run, but even so).

      Roll on the day when he's slung in a British jail, transported to Sweden, maybe slung in a Swedish jail, and then forgotten about when he comes out. Nobody cares any more. Along with Royal babies and who's now minister of whatever, I'm so bored of him I couldn't care less.

      1. Cliff

        It's wikileaks, isn't it? They certainly had a load of fundraisers for his South American holiday (bet he wishes he'd read the brochure properly now)

        1. Shades
          Paris Hilton

          You do realise Assange isn't actually in Ecuador don't you, or were you trying to be funny?

          1. Scorchio!!

            "You do realise Assange isn't actually in Ecuador don't you, or were you trying to be funny?"

            Looks like an ironic dig at Assange's desire to fly to Ecuador, and how many people try to claim that the embassy is Ecuadoran territory, which it is most decidedly not.

      2. Scorchio!!

        ISTR that he set his Wikipedia salary at around £80,000. Then there is the considerable advance given him by a publishing house for his autobiography, from which agreement he withdrew whilst keeping the money, thereby proving himself to be completely untrustworthy and pefidious. I believe there are other sizeable chunks hanging around. The whole Wikipedia set up seems to me to belong to the Dear Leader, who uses it as a milch cow.

        You will remember that his earlier benefactors, the ones who stumped up bail for him, lost their money. I'd like to say that he's blown it in that respect, but I somehow think that some of them will continue to bet on this horse.

        1. Tom 38 Silver badge

          Wikipedia != Wikileaks

          They are both run by obsequious middle aged men, just different ones.

  7. Herby Silver badge

    Maybe if...

    Mr. Assange's people can leak some Hillary Clinton documents/emails, he might get some people in the USA to give him some help. Probably not the ones he wants, but you never know.

  8. Snivelling Wretch

    Where does this £10m cost supposedly come from?

    1. S4qFBxkFFg

      Police presence at the embassy, their salaries, overtime, NI, other employment costs.

      Yes, they'd get paid anyway, but the assumption is that other police would be needed to do what the new embassy guards were doing before.

    2. Dominion

      £10,000 a day to have a police presence outside the embassy to arrest him if he tries to leave.

      http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-31159594

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        "£10,000 a day to have a police presence outside the embassy to arrest him if he tries to leave."

        How many police men and women make up a £10,000 per day, I wonder?

      2. MrXavia

        I assume we'll send the bill to the Sweeds?

        It is them after all that have asked for him,so they should cover the cost right?

        1. Alister Silver badge

          I assume we'll send the bill to the Swedes?

          No, why would we? It's not their fault he decided to skip bail in Britain. The police are there to arrest him for that offence - for which there is no shadow of a doubt of his guilt btw...

    3. Chris Miller

      Rough guess

      Say you need 5 plods to guard the embassy (assuming there's more than one entrance/exit). Mounting that guard 24x365 would require 30 bodies plus a few 'chiefs' to manage the 'indians'. Cost of those bodies is over £3 million a year* (not just salary, you need to include all their kit, pensions funding etc).

      * Met police current budget £3.7bn pa for 37,000 pairs of boots on the ground.

      1. John H Woods Silver badge

        Re: Rough guess

        Can't see any problem with a Rough order of Magnitude estimate of a plod being £100k pa. But "cost to the taxpayer" stuff is not as simple as adding this up.

        Firstly, a figure of 'millions' is negligible compared to the tax pot, so reporting it in absolute terms can mislead those who are not aware of the annual tax take. Secondly, at least half of the salary of the plod ends up back in the tax system (and the purchase equipment with which he is supplied benefits the businesses who supply that equipment, and their employees, and the taxman benefits from both of these --- same is true for the coffee and doughnuts he buys when off duty etc.). Thirdly, the police keeping an eye on Assange are presumably not exclusively dedicated to that: if a high priority incident occurs nearby, some of them will surely be redeployed appropriately.

    4. Blofeld's Cat
      Facepalm

      "Where does this £10m cost supposedly come from?"

      It's one of those magic numbers usually reserved for phrases, like "... with a street value of £X,000 ...", beloved by official spokespersons.

      It's calculated on the basis that the ambassador used to just leave the keys in the door when he nipped out to the shops, and the police had no idea it was even an embassy, before you-know-who turned up.

    5. Small Furry Animal

      @ Snivelling Wretch

      I see that you're not a beancounter^W accountant then. It's called Creative Accounting

    6. DropBear Silver badge

      "Where does this £10m cost supposedly come from?"

      It's simply cold, hard fact - much like the statement that 98.7% of all statistics are made up on the spot.

    7. Natalie Gritpants

      It's money well spent to keep the principles of UK law and justice alive. There is an upper limit on what it will cost: for the taxpayer the max cost will be £10m * his remaining life span; for Mr Assange the max cost is his life.

      1. Cliff

        Employing people isn't just their take home salary costs. There's the NI, holiday pay, sick pay, maternity, recruitment, training, HR overhead, management of said staff, desk space, payroll run costs, IT overhead, uniforms, equipment, welfare vehicles, shift costs, plus the cost of what those coppers aren't able to at the same time. Employing people is expensive, the overhead is huge.

  9. x 7 Silver badge

    time to break off diplomatic relations with Ecuador, declare the embassy staff persona-non-grata and insist on evacuation of the embassy.

    1. LucreLout Silver badge

      They'd simply appoint him to a role, and he's free to leave with them to the airport. A little like the Libyan embassy thing, where due to international law we had to let a murder of WPC Fletcher simply walk away. Of course, if the building were to catch fire Assange would be facing some uncomfortable choices...

      I'm quite amazed he has lasted this long.... Self appointed house arrest for years on end, and all the charges will still be waiting for him when he eventually walks out the door. Certainly he will be looking at arrest and jail time for his bail jumping, and any extradition to the USA will happen during that period anyway. He seems to be acheiving little with his time, and may be better just serving whatever tariff is due.

      1. Velv Silver badge

        "I'm quite amazed he has lasted this long.... Self appointed house arrest for years on end..."

        You've answered your own statement. Without his self appointed house arrest he'd have disappeared into the mists of obscurity years ago. His continued "situation" merely keeps him in the (increasing diming) spotlight.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        They'd simply appoint him to a role, and he's free to leave with them to the airport.

        Nope, diplomatic protocol has been explained ad infinitum. The UK would have to first accept that appointment for it to have any status, and that is really not going to happen.

        A little like the Libyan embassy thing, where due to international law we had to let a murder of WPC Fletcher simply walk away.

        Unfortunately, in that case diplomatic immunity was in place so the only solution was to close that shop and expel the lot of them :(. However in Assange's case that would not protect him, because he has no way to acquire diplomatic status (as explained above) so he'd simply be arrested anyway the moment the cleaners carried him out with all the other rubbish that they would leave behind.

      3. Scorchio!!

        "They'd simply appoint him to a role, and he's free to leave with them to the airport"

        No, utterly wrong; it would have to a) be done in advance, and b) be approved by the Court of St James, and you can bet your anus that they will not approve the application.

        Yvonne Fletcher was another matter.

        Assange does not have long left in the embassy. He will at some point face a pressing need of greater importance than avoiding the Swedish authorities. Perhaps they could relinquish their claim on him - and they have offered this to the US - then the UK CJS could arrest him for bail jumping, jail him on remand, and wait for the Americans to accept him into Hillary Clinton's loving bosom, or failing that into the Guantanamo womb, where Lindy could lead him around on a dog leash. Oh happy ironical thoughts.

        1. This post has been deleted by its author

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            One bizarro option is that "Ecuador could theoretically appoint Assange one of its representatives to the United Nations, under rule 25 of the UN General Assembly’s Rules of Procedure."

            http://www.headoflegal.com/2012/06/26/julian-assange-can-he-get-out-of-this/

            Don't you think that if that was an option he would not have taken it already? That *theory* was put forward in 2012, but I think it has been disproved by people who are actual UK diplomats. In addition, Assange had no diplomatic status when he skipped bail, and you cannot apply diplomatic status retrospectively.

    2. x 7 Silver badge

      Oh wow! I got TEN down votes for that. We really do have some idiots reading this. I point out the simplest quickest resolution and get downvotes. Weird

  10. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Can't they do the trial without him?

    1. Def Silver badge

      No, because he hasn't actually been charged with anything yet.

      He's merely "wanted for questioning".

      1. Scorchio!!

        Not so; the Swedish CJS protocol for charging an offender is to first interview then charge. The police had informed Assange's Swedish council of their intention to do just that. Mysteriously and overnight, Julie disappeared and reappeared in the UK, like a game of whack a mole. Worse still, aside from his counsel's claim that the police had not been in touch with him (and, in retrospect/examining his cell phone in a UK court he rescinded that statement, confirming they had [1]), his professional association publicly announced their intention to interview said counsel on the matter of this behaviour.

        Thus, Julie is an absconder twice over; he absconded when his counsel learned of the Swedish police intention to interview and charge/arrest him; he absconded when on bail in the UK. He has a behavioural history of fleeing from one country to another, and he has a criminal record (17 counts in Oz, where he was convicted for among other things hacking a USAAF/Pentagon server), and it all holds together very tightly, that is to say, his history speaks for itself, it discredits him. On the basis of his publicly known record I developed the opinion that this man is perfidious, untrustworthy, does not understand normal social rule following and legal rule following conventions and is prone to making judgements that leave him, quite literally, cornered. Julie locked himself away, and Julie has only himself to blame for this.

        He should not have been bailed when in the UK, if only because of his record of flying from one country to another and of absconding from Sweden. Now that he has offended there they are probably unlikely to offer him citizenship, and I hope that he is deported to Australia and immediately forwarded to the US.

        [1] The cell phone company's records would clearly indicate this to the court and thus the satisfaction of his professional association, and I imagine he had his career in mind when on the stand in said UK court.

  11. Snivelling Wretch

    I find this fascinating. What if someone (a member of the public) gained entrance and forcibly removed him? Presumably Assange could then be arrested - or would that be considered invalid? And what about the "kidnapper"? Since he's back outside the embassy, would Ecauador have to charge him and request extradition from the UK? Would he be liable for any charge in the UK?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Nope, it's a myth.

      It's a UK building on UK soil where UK laws apply. The reason we don't just walk in is there is an understanding around the world that they are pseudo territories of the nation they represent and therefore exempt from local law enforcement.

      The simple reason we don't go in, we would then have no moral high ground to complain when another country did the same and snatched our embassy staff for local law violations.

      Think of it as a gentleman's agreement rather than law.

    2. Scorchio!!

      In the first instance 'twould be trespass. In the second instance it would be a violation of the embassy's status, private individual or no, otherwise private contractors in the form of bailiffs might fit the bill. For breaking an international convention it would seem wise for the UK to formally charge her/him, but the question of what to do with the package once it is out of the embassy is indeed tempting! However, I believe that the police probably have a duty here, and the government are bound by convention.

    3. Peter2 Silver badge

      Yep, he could be arrested one step outside of the embassy as he's be on British soil.

      Technically, the people "kidnapping" him would be in violation of Ecaudorian law however they can't enforce that outside of the embassy and if the embassy staff attempted to intervene one step outside of the embassy then they would be committing a criminal offense under British law, though chances are that their diplomatic staff would be covered under diplomatic immunity. If they did then they'd probably end up being arrested and then later released when it was proved that they did have diplomatic immunity, though having been arrested they'd probably be declared "persona non grata" (Latin for "An Unwelcome Person") which basically means that we would refuse to accept their diplomatic immunity after a period long enough to pack and take a flight out of the country. At this point we might either press criminal charges or forcibly kick them out of the country if they didn't leave of their own accord. Being PNG'd is embarassing and career damaging enough for a diplomat without further indignaties so they generally leave quietly.

      Once outside the embassy then Ecauador couldn't request Assange be extradited. Extradition is a process that is simply used when somebody commits a crime in one jurisdiction and then flees beyond the short arm of the law. The long arm of law then comes into effect and the police in the jurisdiction the criminal has flad to arrest the suspect, check to see if there is reasonable cause to assume that the criminal is in fact a criminal and then extradite them to face justice in the country they committed the offense in.

      If somebody did "kidnap" Assange and drag him outside the door to be arrested then personally were I them then i'd avoid going on holiday to Ecaudor, however I doubt they'd face charges in the UK as there are precedents going back half a millenia when people have (while abroad) dragged a wanted criminal aboard a ship and sailed back to the UK and handed them over to the police and ultimately the courts. In no case that I can think of has anybody ever faced charges in the UK for delivering a wanted fugitive evading justice to a British court. I think British courts have declined to extradite people who have dragged somebody onto a British ship in the past, but frankly I can't think of any cases of embassies being invaded to drag somebody out and there is no real way of predicting what the judge would decide if an extradition request was put before him.

      Personally, I doubt they'd be extradited though. The justice seceratery has a veto IIRC which he'd probably use if it came down to it given the government efforts put into persuading the ecuadorians to hand him over in the first place.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        See my above comment, they would not be breaking any Ecuadorian laws, but they would break UK ones. The embassy is on UK soil and subject to UK laws.

        1. Peter2 Silver badge

          If it was entirely UK law then they certainly wouldn't face any charges whatsoever, since making a citizens arrest in a situation where a police constable cannot is perfectly legal.

          There are international treaties that basically restrict how a hosting nation can treat an overseas embassy.

    4. Tom 38 Silver badge

      I find this fascinating. What if someone (a member of the public) gained entrance and forcibly removed him?

      We found the same thing very non-amusing when it happened 4 years ago in Iran.

  12. Happy reader

    Little

    I believe "little Ecuador" is larger than UK.

    1. gazthejourno (Written by Reg staff)

      Re: Little

      I'll give you a hint. The picture shows the full extent of Little Ecuador.

      1. Happy reader

        Re: Little

        67 Philippines 300,000

        68 Ecuador 283,560

        69 Burkina Faso 274,200

        70 New Zealand 269,190

        71 Gabon 267,667

        72 Guinea 245,857

        73 United Kingdom 243,610

        74 Ghana

        1. Oninoshiko
          Facepalm

          Re: Little

          They are talking about the embassy.

          Can we get a clue-bat icon?

  13. WalterAlter
    Facepalm

    You Assange Bashing Bastards Are a Pox

    Just read the title again.

    1. This post has been deleted by its author

      1. WalterAlter

        Re: You Assange Bashing Bastards Are a Pox

        Yah, well, just read the title again. This is a merit based post, that's all the effort yer gonna get.

  14. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    10,000,000

    fucking quid we (the tax payer who really doesn't give a shit about the silver haired little fuck-twat) have had to shell out. How many nurses, doctors, houses, other noble causes could we have funded with that amount of money?? Beggars belief. We should just break in, extract the little shit, pay for the damage (how much does a door cost!) and let the Swedes take him...

    Makes my shit itch so see such a waste of good money....

    Furthermore (whilst my shit is itching) how can I survive, rent a house, drive a decent car and have a nice toy box for 20k a year and that twat is costing 3.3 mill a year!!!!

    1. Mark 85 Silver badge

      Re: 10,000,000

      Furthermore (whilst my shit is itching) how can I survive, rent a house, drive a decent car and have a nice toy box for 20k a year and that twat is costing 3.3 mill a year!!!!

      Simple... you don't have 24/7 police protection around your house. If you did, than add the 3.3 mill a year to the cost. However, by not having that 3.3 mill expense, you're free to come and go whenever you want and to anyplace you want. The twit is stuck on his couch.

  15. FozzyBear Silver badge

    Do we know for a fact that he is still there?

    Is it possible they have managed to smuggle him out

    1. Lee D Silver badge

      1) He gives interviews on a regular basis to visitors to the embassy.

      2) To assist his escape would be ... pretty much illegal I think.

      3) I'm sure the plods outside would notice, given that's all they are there to do

      4) Where's he going to go? Good luck getting out of the country without anyone noticing.

      5) Definitely, supremely, absolutely resisting arrest - even if hiding in the embassy wasn't enough.

  16. Mystereed
    Black Helicopters

    Plausible deniability solution

    One night, pump in knockout gas while they are all asleep.

    Pick the lock (or maybe keys could be accessed from the buildings owners - is it leasehold?).

    Drag out Mr Assange, still in his pyjamas, deposit him somewhere nearby.

    When he comes to and tries to get back, capture him and announce he was caught while sleepwalking.

    All the others who were asleep and knocked out, will have the affects wear off and wake up normally?

    Might have to sort out some security camera footage too - maybe a power cut as an easy option? Arrange a few in the days running up to the event, just to get people used to the idea.

    Could do all that for less than a week's worth of police cover.

    Or is this too evil?

    1. x 7 Silver badge

      Re: Plausible deniability solution

      not too evil. Just too risky.......Don't forget the results when the Russians tried it during a hostage stand-off. A lot of people died from the gas

  17. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    £10m

    That money could have been better wasted by MPs expenses.

    Who'll think of the politicians?

  18. Wreckage

    Assange is a hero standing up for you

    Assange is a hero who is fighting for your right to post your ridiculous, media-influenced comments in this forum. You should all be on his side.

    https://newmatilda.com/2014/11/17/special-investigation-siege-julian-assange-farce

    1. x 7 Silver badge

      Re: Assange is a hero standing up for you

      "Assange is a hero who is fighting for your right to post your ridiculous, media-influenced comments in this forum. You should all be on his side."

      total bollocks. He's a media obsessed paranoid narcistic dilletante obsessed with self-promotion who has created a severe security risk to the free world.

      He should be locked away in a small room with bad food and bad ventilation and never allowed out to see the light of day again

    2. AnotherBird

      Re: Assange is a hero standing up for you

      Assange has shown that he only stands for Assange. Assange enter the embassy while out on bail after losing his extradition hearings, about two weeks before he was to be sent to Sweden. The authorities in the UK expected him to uphold his bail condition, or at least his sureties force them to. Those sureties had to admit that they could not do that resulting in all of them losing money. Refusing to present himself to the court when requested will also result in Assange losing money, but also spending time in jail. He has created a situation where during his hearing on the punish he should get that he might not get bail (as he does not deserve that privilege).

      These people cheer-leading Assange have done him no service.

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