back to article Syneto: Behold, blockheads – an all-flash array... based on ZFS

A ZFS-based all-flash array? There's a thing to note in this block-focused all-flash array world. Europe-based Syneto has developed the product and it has updated its SMB-focused, ZFS-using Extreme 220 product. The Extreme 220 is a 2U x 24 hot-swap slot box with from 2TB to 144TB of SATA or SAS SSDs. That means 6TB SSDs are …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Where can I buy a 6TB SSD?

    On uk.insight.com there are a few 2TB drives (at £2K-£3K per unit!) and PCIe cards.

    I found this:

    http://gadgets.ndtv.com/laptops/news/sandisk-unveils-4tb-ssd-says-6tb-and-8tb-ssds-are-due-next-year-1-518516

    but don't see them on sale.

  2. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Btrfs would be so much faster and reliable.

    1. This post has been deleted by its author

    2. iOS6 user

      > Btrfs would be so much faster and reliable.

      As long as btrfs still is using allocation structures insead free list forget about this.

      Btrfs as well does not have anything like ZFS ARC.

      So far each month is possible to spot many reports about different crashes of btrfs. In the same time it is really hard to find something about ZFS crashes.

    3. phil dude
      Linux

      not yet...

      I have both, but ZFS is far more stable - currently.

      The biggest problem with ZFS is that it cannot be included in the Linux kernel, and so there is extra work to keep it out of tree.

      BTRFS is probably usable for those of a less paranoid nature than I, but for now I will say ZFS is working fine.

      P.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: not yet...

        ZFS not being included in the Linux kernel is not a problem, it's a boon.

  3. Fazal Majid

    In other words they stuck some Illumos based distribution like OpenIndiana or SmartOS on top of commodity hardware, added a Web UI, and called it a day. ZFS deduplication is a notorious memory hog and not recommended for production use. Compression works very well, on the other hand.

    As for BTRFS, it is at least 5 years behind in terms of maturity and robustness, ZFS is available for Linux as well, just not shipping together because it's license is not ideologically pure enough for the ayatollahs of GPL.

    1. Bronek Kozicki Silver badge

      Perhaps they stuffed it with one or two TB of RAM. That would allow for a pretty large number of VM guests alongside with ZFS deduplication

      In reality what I suspect is going on, they give client a switch to turn deduplication on, with a large warning on it "use only if you have this-and-this much ECC RAM installed"

      Also this is very unlikely to be OpenSolaris derived work and much more likely is ZFS on Linux, because you cannot run "KVM hypervisor" they seem to advertise outside of Linux kernel

      1. iOS6 user

        > Also this is very unlikely to be OpenSolaris derived work and much more likely is ZFS on Linux, because you cannot run "KVM hypervisor" they seem to advertise outside of Linux kernel

        KVM has been fully ported to OpenSolaris.

        https://smartos.org/2011/08/15/kvm-on-illumos/

        OpenSolaris now can run Linux binaries without hypervisor like KVM

        http://www.slideshare.net/bcantrill/illumos-lx

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          @ iOS6 user "Also this is very unlikely to be OpenSolaris derived work"

          It is a Solaris derivitive. I tested it. UI looks good, but I broke my install and haven't looked at it for a couple of months. Each individual feature requires a PGP signed key, I would worry about my data locked into an array with an expired license if the company failed.

        2. Bronek Kozicki Silver badge

          @iOS6 user

          thanks I wasn't aware that kvm has been ported to illumos . Does it also support vfio (i.e. device passthrough)?

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Nah, it's certainly a spin off of OmniOS or something. With regards to KVM Joyent ported it back in 2012 and there's no COMSTAR on Linux.

    2. MadMike

      ZFS dedupe best in class.

      Oracle bought Greenbyte this summer, who rewrote the old memory hungry zfs dedupe engine. The greenbyte zfs dedupe engine will be used in the next solaris upgrade this year. It is fastest and best in class. It can dedupe 5,000 fat VDI virtual machines using 210 TB disk space, down to 4 TB. You can also activate compression in addition. ZFS dedupe will be a real killer when using VMs, and boot 6,000 vms in just five minutes or so.

      http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/10/12/greenbytes_chairman/

  4. Bronek Kozicki Silver badge

    err, what?

    "hosted VMware VMs" which are apparently being run on "KVM hypervisor"? So which hypervisor is it?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: err, what?

      KVM

  5. Jim 59

    In other words they stuck some Illumos based distribution like OpenIndiana or SmartOS on top of commodity hardware, added a Web UI, and called it a day.

    Lol.

  6. Ammaross Danan

    Wow, this article's author must not be too familiar with SAN offerings. Tegile offers all-flash arrays and their secret sauce runs on Solaris using a (albeit slightly modified) ZFS filesystem.

    1. MadMike

      Tegile

      Tegule runs on OpenSolaris, not solaris. They have also rewritten the zfs dedupe engine. But oracle just bought greenbyte with their superior zfs dedupe engine, which solaris will use now.

      http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/10/12/greenbytes_chairman/

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