back to article What on Earth has EMC done to VCE?

EMC and Cisco's converged infrastructure love child, since spurned by the latter parent, will reveal how it's re-inventing itself as a member of the EMC federation on March 12th. The Reg's virtualisation desk is in receipt of marketing emails promising a “next wave” and “the next big thing” in converged infrastructure. There's …

  1. mix
    Happy

    hyper-super-duper-converged

    The new hyper-super-duper-converged systems will include a firewall, WAN accelerator, Particle accelerator, a juicer and a Coffee-maker...all created by rival firms to keep things interesting.

  2. Cthugha

    Will it include a flux capacitor?

  3. CheesyTheClown

    haha!!!

    So, EMC and VMware released a whole new version of vSphere which simply was a whole lot of nothing new. It's like "We'll charge you more than you ever heard of for bug fixes and features everyone else gives away for free". They brag about awesome new performance maximums that their competitors consider to be a baseline configuration. The still have cross-the-board product fragmentation.

    Best of all, they think that storage and networking are premium features! I'm still laughing my ass off at that one.

    So, instead of re-architecting VMware to work like a super beast with EMC and implementing something intelligent like a proper storage system, they made the internal storage system of VMware look more like EMC's legacy junk.

    Cisco on the other hand has built their own end to end solution which completely eliminates any need for VMware. They built monster redundant storage servers for software defined storage. They implemented full support for Microsoft MVGRE across their entire Nexus line including their full internal SDN solution. They even implemented MVGRE acceleration on their VIC cards.

    The only thing I can say nice about VMware and EMC anymore is that at least it's ok for running legacy operating systems... really slowly... with no real management.... with half-assed integration.

    Oh... should I start on OpenStack? Cisco with OpenStack and pure Cisco servers for storage can deliver massive performance performance which VMware can't even dream of with EMC.

    Either solution costs much less and both solutions are far better integrated with Cisco UCS and hardware than VMware is. VMware sees automation as a half-assed after-thought. Don't believe me, try configuring a virtual machine with a serial port and serial port virtualization from PowerCLI, it seems that VMware and EMC don't consider things like full APIs worthwhile.

    Let's talk about things like VAAI NFS. The closest thing VMware has to a proper storage solution is NFS. Unlike SCSI based protocols (such as those across the entire new VMware storage solution), NFS is highly flexible and actually can be extended properly to add additional functionality through the NFS RPC mechanism.

    Well, here's the deal about that, VMware seems to think that before you can have that, you need to pay $5000 for an API reference before implementing the features. VMware didn't even bother implementing the NFS calls as RPC which is what Microsoft and OpenStack did with their solutions. They instead made it so each vendor would have to implement them out-of-band and secure them as well.

    Guess what VMware and EMC, you can keep your clunky junk. I'll give my business and my customers' business to a vendors which actually have a clear path forward. I honestly couldn't believe that after all that time, VSphere 6 was the best you could come up with.

    1. klaxhu

      oh ...tell us more and please do make a list of all the great competition vmware has out there.

      not saying they don't have any, but I doubt anyone has a product more mature or that works better today.

      again, gives us examples - since you were very open on dissing v6

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