back to article NSA lays out its reforms post-Snowden (they can fit on back of a stamp)

The NSA has published its first "report" on signals intelligence "reform" in the US. If you were hoping for sweeping changes in the wake of Ed Snowden's whistleblowing, you're in for disappointment. The factsheet, covering the year to date, was written up after some prodding and tutting by President Obama in January 2014. It …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    As Commentard as detects as secret as code

    Was that a new journalistic NSA proof (as) code or a new version of (as) pig latin :-)

    1. frank ly

      Re: As Commentard as detects as secret as code

      This is why you should use the Corrections link. Fixing the error can make your comment look surreal (not a bad thing) or silly.

      1. frank ly

        Re: As Commentard as detects as secret as code

        Now my post looks silly.

        1. teebie

          Re: As Commentard as detects as secret as code

          Is this conversation *definitely* in the right order?

  2. big_D Silver badge

    So

    the rules seem to cover every eventualtiy... Business as usual then.

    1. Vladimir Plouzhnikov

      Re: So

      Yes. I'm sure an NSA operative's spying on his ex-GF will fit at least one, maybe more of these worthy causes.

      So would collecting compromising material on senators, government officials, LGBT activists etc.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: So

      "Business as usual then"

      Of course. Did anyone expect anything else?

      1. Uffish
        Big Brother

        Re: great expectations

        The USA is very proud of its Constitution, and it's probably true that the people who wrote the constitution were risking their lives - as were the people who fought for it. They must all have expected great things to flow from, and be protected by, their constitution.

        What happened, unfettered power in the hands of untouchable people?

    3. chivo243 Silver badge
      Joke

      Re: So

      @big_D

      It's called the CYA clause. Mandatory in all Gubbermint initiatives.

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Does US law have a definition of a "Criminal threat"?

    Or does the law cover using surveillance to stop canadians walking on the grass?

    1. Oninoshiko

      Re: Does US law have a definition of a "Criminal threat"?

      Criminal threat n. "The People"

    2. Vic

      Re: Does US law have a definition of a "Criminal threat"?

      Or does the law cover using surveillance to stop canadians walking on the grass?

      If those Canadians are walking on American grass, that's one of those "transnational" offences that is explicitly permitted...

      Vic.

  4. Uffish

    The NSA's finest minds...

    ...will be employed in drafting the NSA transparency reports.

  5. nematoad Silver badge

    ?

    " ...there's even a mission statement in the NSA HQ foyer reminding analysts how important privacy is."

    I'm sure there is, the question is, is it their privacy or ours?

    1. Amorous Cowherder
      Happy

      Re: ?

      " ...there's even a mission statement in the NSA HQ foyer reminding analysts how important privacy is."

      There's some really superb photos in our foyer at work, doesn't make any of us artists or photographers! Ha ha!

      1. Bob Wheeler
        Big Brother

        Re: ?

        "there's even a mission statement in the NSA HQ foyer reminding analysts how important privacy is."

        Is that just under the 30ft tall picture of Big Brother?

  6. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    reform

    to weed out whistleblowers faster, more efficiently, before they run away with something fishy. This will require a tenfold increase in budget.

    Approved!

  7. William Boyle

    Right!

    "When pressed, she said her agency was trying to ensure there are "no secret legal interpretations," and how the agency shouldn't rely on "cute legal interpretations" to extend its reach over the planet's inhabitants."

    Right! That and about 3 quid (5 USD) will get you a nice latte at Starbucks...

  8. John Smith 19 Gold badge
    FAIL

    "These gagging orders will now expire after three years."

    Unless of course the surveillance is ongoing, in which case they won't.

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