back to article EMC: Kerr-ching! $430m XtremIO gulp's paying off... Hello, $1bn a year

EMC president Chad Sakac says the XtremIO will be the fastest product in EMC’s history to reach a billion dollar run-rate. A new release is coming to keep the momentum up. XtremIO was bought by EMC for $430m in May 2012, at which point it did not have a shipping product. The first product was announced a year later, May, 2013 …

  1. chrismevans
    FAIL

    Only EMC's View

    "AFAs are not right … for workloads that require mainframe support." - because EMC's product doesn't support it. There's no reason to say mainframe services couldn't benefit from flash and in fact in the 1980's we had Memorex and others (EMC also I believe) selling small scale flash devices for M/F.

    "AFAs are not right… for workloads that require "classic enterprise array" data services like huge at scale replication … There are no AFAs that support this (yet)." - because EMC's product doesn't support this. Again, just because EMC doesn't support it, doesn't mean it isn't required. Incidentally other vendors like HP 3PAR StoreServ and HDS HUSVM DO support these features.

    "AFAs are not right …for the "oceans of object storage" or for traditional (vs. new transactional and in-memory) batch HDFS use cases." - this is becoming less true - in fact object vendors are adding flash to their products to support high performance demands (see Cleversafe).

    It would be interesting to know how much of the $1bn run rate is newly acquired business and how much is business that would have been placed on other EMC platforms...

    1. DeepStorage

      No way to know

      Unfortunately Chris there's no way to know how many Xtremio deals fall into each of the following:

      1 - We bleed EMC and would buy whatever they are selling. VNX AFA or VMAX full of flash if XIO not available.

      2 - We use a lot of EMC kit and were looking at Pure/SF but EMC sold us XIO at deep discount to keep us from seeing how good alternatives are.

      3 - We wouldn't have bought EMC if XIO wasn't there to buy

    2. Michael Duke

      Re: Only EMC's View

      Except that HP 3Par and HDS HUSVM are NOT AFA's.

      They are hybrid arrays without disk, there are significant differences in latency between a hybrid box with just SSD (VNX/3Par/V7000/HUSVM) and a true AFA (Xtreme-IO / IBM Flash System / Pure etc.)

      1. pd_p
        Stop

        Re: Only EMC's View

        nonsensical pure-breds vs. muggle-born argument.. didn't make sense in the Rowling world and doesn't make sense here. After all, an array delivering hundreds of thousands of IOPS consistently at sub-millisecond latencies (as low as 300 microsec for random reads without cache hits and 200 microsec for random writes), with features like Dedup is nothing but an AFA. Care to show Pure/XtremIO "latencies".

        I think the best argument would be "if an array delivers six-nines availability guarantee, it CANNOT be an all-flash array"

        --------

        HP 3PAR Employee

      2. Rulon

        Re: Only EMC's View

        You need to check your facts. Or maybe you need to simply not fall into the trap of defining things according to a narrow definition that is a disservice to your customers and is calculated to blind them to legitimate competition. Basically, what you are saying is that there is some kind of inherent advantage in being built from the ground-up even if that 'ground-up' model is lacking features, has a really, really hard time with upgrades, very limited HA, and will be totally obsolete when the next super-fast disk technology hits the market. Being built from the 'ground-up' is only an advantage if it actually produces advantages. It's like telling people that only 8 cylinder cars are fast. That argument only works on customers who never drove a Porsche with a 320 hp flat-six.

      3. Man Mountain

        Re: Only EMC's View

        What utter nonsense. Nobody buys an all flash array because it is an AFA, they buy it because it is bloody fast. HP 3PAR is bloody fast (and can be described as an AFA if you wanted to be pedantic). And the advantage is it has all the functionality that EMC seem to think no one can deliver!!

      4. angryguy

        Re: Only EMC's View

        Is that why the 3PAR array is the only one to submit an SPC-1 benchmark with under 1ms latency response time?

        Is that why 3PAR has a much better RAW to usable than any other product except XtremIO? (Admittedly XtremIO does really great with RAW to usable but the fact that 3PAR smokes everyone else in this still debunks your point.)

        And last I checked, the 3PAR product is the only one whose 5 year warranty has NO caveats.

        I'm sorry but this nonsense about "true AFA" vs "hybrid AFA" is religious vomit and has no technical merit. It's just marketing bs spewed by the Pure's & EMC's of the world. Heck I'd expect EMC to spew this because the VNX & VMAX are so old there's no way they can address Flash the way a 3PAR or HDS can.

        1. bitpushr

          Re: Only EMC's View

          NetApp's flash offerings also offer caveat-free warranties.

          Disclaimer: I am a NetApp employee.

  2. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    leaving to PureStorage

    glad it's doing well, why are people leaving EMC and going to PureStorage on mass?

    1. M. B.

      Re: leaving to PureStorage

      "en masse"

      Also, Pure is full of VC cash, so I imagine they can pony up some big signing bonuses for top talent. People like money!

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      As Chuck Hollis of EMC fame used to say :-

      "They're raiding the roadmap".........

      This is simply intended to make EMC Customers hold off on that RFP / POC / purchase of Pure, 3PAR, Solidfire etc. What it's saying is EMC should have something competitive at some point in the future. Which although I'm sure is true, it completely brushes aside the fact that the other vendors (who already have these features) aren't standing still either. They have feature maturity today not in six month time and crucially they also have roadmaps above and beyond what V4 may or may not offer at some undisclosed point in the future.

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: leaving to PureStorage

      "leaving to PureStorage

      glad it's doing well, why are people leaving EMC and going to PureStorage on mass?"

      The promise of personal wealth, and professional growth.

      EMC is a big, mature company. Opportunity to grow can be stifled by politics and financial reality.

      Until recently Pure was offering compensation packages that defy economic constraints because they have none. When you are spending other people's private money you can pay a sales team $2M in compensation on $2.5M in sales. Same team at EMC would earn 1/5th the money.

      Now Pure has to scramble to clean up the evidence of the "party at Mom's house" and get ready for the world to have a look at the books. So the incentives to go there are massively different.

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Constant Attrition

    EMC has had to (and will always) continuously fight various cash-rich start-ups, pecking away at niche parts of their business. It is inevitable that some make more impact than others. Buying EMC is not always about the $/GB or the lack of a "special" capability it has now. RPO, Support, Integration & Skill base are often dismissed, but are just as important. Buying EMC is like the old Big Blue days - 'no-one got fired for buying IBM'. Except that, when you bolt a bunch of EMC tech together, you do actually often get more than the sum of the parts, which is usually a good thing. It's horses for courses and the courses let alone the rides, are all different. You pick the best product / solution that fits - nothing is better or worse than anything else, as everyone is an "expert" and everyone has an opinion.

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