back to article Ubuntu's shiny 10th birthday Unicorn: An upgrade fantasy

For a celebratory 10th birthday release, Ubuntu 14.10 is a bit of a damp squib. I've been covering Ubuntu for seven of the release’s 10 years and 14.10 is the first time I've had to dig deep into the release notes just to find something new to test. If you needed further proof that Canonical is currently solely focused on …

  1. Stuart 22

    A really great upgrade

    Updated 5 desktops so far with the 'K' variant. Nothing broke. This is as good as an upgrade can get. Maybe doing nothing is a good idea.

    Except that us non-unity folks did get an extra wallpaper - weehee!!!!!

    NB if you are not getting the 14.10 upgrade option - its probably 14.04 setting the updates to LTS only. Change it to Normal Release and try again.

  2. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Meh!

    Wot no flashy new stuff? No Innovation?

    Just like a certain fruity company's latest bits of kit & software

    It can't be long before they whole Ubuntu 'everywhere' ships starts sailing. The question is, will there be anyone on board apart from a few die-hards?

    How will Canonical make back all the money they have spent? The pockets of Mr Shuttleworth will sooner or later run dry and they WILL have to start charging for things.

    Where is all that money going to come from? Linux users are notorious freetards and don't even want to pay for their morning Coffee's.

    1. Mad Mike

      Re: Meh!

      "Where is all that money going to come from? Linux users are notorious freetards and don't even want to pay for their morning Coffee's."

      Mmmmm. Nothing like insulting a load of people. Maybe Linux users simply like freedom and quality rather than being hemmed in my Windows? Maybe they like an OS that runs and runs well on older/slower hardware? I think jumping from free OS to free everything is rather a leap without additional evidence.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Meh!

        Well as a long term Linux user, I don't feel instulted by the question.

        How is Cannonical going to monetize their product?

        Go Google for +ubuntu +monetization

        More than 2 million hits.

        I'm in the CentOS camp so the question is moot as far as I'm concerned.

        We all know how RedHat gets its $1B+ a year. The same goes for SUSE but how will Canonical sustain the development of Ubuntu. IMHO, that sooner or later something is going to have to give.

        What will happen if Mark Shuttlework decides to go do something else? Will the funds dry up?

        1. asdf Silver badge

          Re: Meh!

          >We all know how RedHat gets its $1B+ a year.

          Yeah too bad they weren't happy with that and foisted the freedesktop.borg, wayland, systemd hairball that has now ruined pretty much all the distros. All for mo money.

        2. Maventi

          Re: Meh!

          I think their plan is to monetise support and provide things like the Orange Box as well. They seem to be getting pretty big in the OpenStack space and already have some pretty big deployments out there so I'd say there is some source of revenue there. Their concept for the desktop seems to be turning it into a unified endpoint platform.

          Shuttleworth seems to be playing the long term strategy with Canonical, I guess a little like Bezos does with Amazon.

          This is all speculation through observation though. And I am little offended by the AC. I pay for proprietary software where it works well. Ubuntu also happens to provide a great desktop experience at no cost, and like most Linux distros it's very modular which makes it extremely easy to customise for a variety of situations.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Linux users are notorious freetards ... don't even want to pay for coffee

      http://www.techspot.com/news/51368-humble-bundle-shows-windows-gamers-are-cheap-linux-users-arent.html

      How does that square with your view of linux users as 'freetards' who won't pay for anything?

  3. GBE

    The best thing about Ubuntu is...

    The best thing about Ubuntu is Xubuntu.

    Thanks anyway, but I don't want to play endless rounds of "guess how this month's desktop works." I've got work to do...

    1. Anonymous Dutch Coward

      Re: The best thing about Ubuntu is...

      The best thing about Ubuntu is Debian :)

      ... though I wonder whether it will survive systemd...

      1. bill 36

        Re: The best thing about Ubuntu is...

        Mint

        And i don't mean Polos :>)

      2. Thecowking

        Re: The best thing about Ubuntu is...

        Personally, it's Ubuntu Mate for me rather than Xubuntu (I'm not averse to an XFCE desktop or two, but I prefer mate)

        But the _best_ thing about GNU/Linux is that we're all using it and we all have what we want, even if some people like Unity, it doesn't mean we have to use it. So that's nice.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: The best thing about Ubuntu is...

          we're all using it

          Really!!!

          Last time I looked approx 92% of people used Windows and 7% used OS X leaving 1% using Linux

          1. asdf Silver badge

            Re: The best thing about Ubuntu is...

            Sadly I use Windows part of the day too but it takes a decent salary to bribe me into doing so. What I love is this AC probably argues in another article forum about how people shouldn't be cattle and should give the low single digit market share Windows Phone a chance.

          2. tom dial Silver badge

            Re: The best thing about Ubuntu is...

            Yes. We are the 1%!

      3. asdf Silver badge

        Re: The best thing about Ubuntu is...

        >... though I wonder whether it will survive systemd...

        It will but it will be pretty much be like every other distro and eventually such a neutered tight hairball it will be hard to tell from Windows. *BSD looking better by the day. Still sadly before long a lot of FOSS won't run without systemd.

        1. keithpeter
          Windows

          Re: The best thing about Ubuntu is...

          "*BSD looking better by the day. "

          OpenBSD 5.6 CDs arrived this morning complete with Apocalypse Now puffer fish graphics and a song (a sub-cultural thing I gather). Official release 1st Nov (mirrors go live with binary packages then).

          Its..... not Ubuntu.

          E.g. printing: install cups and then create _cups group, give _cups group ownership of the printer device (in my case direct USB connected) the set cups to start as daemon having added your user to the _cups group...

          But interesting.

        2. Gene Cash Silver badge

          Re: The best thing about Ubuntu is...

          I've put Pin-Priority: -1000 for systemd in my preferences file several months ago. If it doesn't install/update w/o systemd, I don't need it.

    2. Craigness

      Re: The best thing about Ubuntu is...

      As a Unity (is the best thing about Ubuntu) user I understand how ignorant your comment is. As a Xubuntu user you will never know.

      1. keithpeter
        Windows

        Re: The best thing about Ubuntu is...

        "As a Unity (is the best thing about Ubuntu) user I understand how ignorant your comment is. As a Xubuntu user you will never know."

        Load LibreOffice and type the following keyboard shortcut: Alt-IOF

        Does the LibreOffice formula editor appear?

        If so, I may once again try Ubuntu as I rather liked 12.04.

        If not, well can we tell Mark to stop hacking the input manager?

        1. thames

          Does the LibreOffice formula editor appear?

          "Load LibreOffice and type the following keyboard shortcut: Alt-IOF Does the LibreOffice formula editor appear?"

          I just tried it with 14.04 Unity, and it worked fine.

          1. J 3
            Paris Hilton

            Re: Does the LibreOffice formula editor appear?

            I'm also running 14.04 (LibreOffice 4.2.7.2) but in my system pressing the left Alt then iof (with or without shift, just in case) just brings down the insert, format, and file menus in quick succession. Pressing the right Alt then iof just gives alternative characters). Am I doing it the wrong way?

        2. Henm2

          Re: The best thing about Ubuntu is...

          Yes just tried it. The formula editor does appear.

        3. SolidSquid

          Re: The best thing about Ubuntu is...

          Seems to work fine in Linux Mint too

  4. This post has been deleted by its author

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Cough Cough the best thing... Mint, make a quick exit.

  6. getHandle

    I'll just be happy...

    ...if it "Detects" a few less "System Problems"

  7. Steven Raith

    Bunged it on an Elitebook today

    Folio 1401 or something, I think. Everything worked bar the trackpad on/off shortcut button, but the actual trackpad system settings works perfectly. Was up and running in 20 minutes, all updates installed, propietary bits installed, dual monitors over Displayport working perfectly - happy happy.

    I could have gone with Debian (and I do for servers) but years of using Unity at home mean I'm used to it's layout and have a decent workflow sorted with it, so Umbongo it is for the works lappy. AS someone noted further up, I want something that works, and credit where credits due, if you aren't too fussed about being fully FOSS (the proprietary stuff sticks in some OSS peoples craw a bit - which is fair enough) then Ubuntu generally works better on more hardware than most other distros IME.

    Anyway, seems like a solid release. Carry on.

    Steven R

  8. thames
    Happy

    I'll probably stick with 14.04

    I'll probably stick with 14.04 as I'm more interested in using my computer than in playing with the latest toys. I like the Unity desktop, and I think the current version is very polished and easy to use and I have no problems recommending it to anyone.

    As for the applications, there's no need to upgrade to get the latest Firefox, as that gets upgraded automatically in 14.04 whenever Mozilla puts out a new version anyway. If you need (or just want) the latest version of some other application, then I suppose that could be a reason.

    The desktop version of Ubuntu is what gets all the publicity, but the server version is quietly getting a lot of effort put into it. Ubuntu is very popular in the cloud market, and there are a lot of new things to be found there, like new versions of OpenStack, Docker, MAAS and Juju, and better ARM64 and POWER8 support. The new kernel also apparently has improvements in the file system, networking, security, and virtualization.

    As for what they are doing in mobile, I think they are aiming primarily at what they see as the next big thing, which they call "converged devices". That is, they think that as phones become more powerful, they will replace desktops. The idea is that you will be able to drop your phone into a dock and use it with a monitor, keyboard, and mouse. When you are using it as a phone you get a phone UI, and when you are using it as a desktop it automatically switches to a desktop UI. The two UIs are related, but not the identical.

    Microsoft is trying to switch to this strategy after the "phone everywhere" concept flopped (Windows 8), and Apple seems to be trying to slowly evolve in that direction as well. I don't know if Google has a strategy for this with Android, perhaps they intend to bring Android and ChromeOS together somehow.

    All in all, I'm quite content.

  9. ScottME
    Linux

    Choice is good

    I've been loyally installing each successive Ubuntu release since 2007 but for the first time, I'll be giving this release a miss. I've only just installed 14.04 on a second-user ThinkPad X220 (£300 for a grade A refurb from Tier 1 online, better than any new laptop), and it works a treat on this older hardware for which the 14.04 software is properly sorted. 14.10 has nothing I need or want.

  10. Henry Wertz 1 Gold badge

    "Load LibreOffice and type the following keyboard shortcut: Alt-IOF

    Does the LibreOffice formula editor appear?"

    Yes, in Ubuntu 14.04 at least. But I'm using the "Gnome Flashback" desktop (which looks like "traditional" Gnome), not Unity. I don't know if that affects this or not.

    I must say this is one thing I like about Linux. I think Unity is awful, but, I don't have to use it! It's trivially easy to install alternatives (and if someone else *does* like Unity, they can log out, select Unity, and log back in, no fuss, no muss.) Imagine how much easier time Microsoft would have had foisting Windows 8 onto people if one could have just changed the desktop UI out for a better one!

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Actually ripping out the desktop (for NeXT) and using csh (via SUA/SFU) has been a long standing tradition here. And before Win 95, I was using others going back to Windows 2.0. Mi Amiga 2000's BridgeBoard firmly established once and for all that nothing was immutable. (It also ran BSD very nicely indeed.) It all comes down to what level of violence one needs (are comfortable with).

  11. Vociferous

    Linux Mint.

    Ubuntu done right.

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