back to article Microsoft KILLS Windows 8.1 Update 2 and Patch Tuesday

Microsoft has at last revealed the date when its second major update to Windows 8.1 will ship to customers: never. Despite months of speculation that the software giant has been planning to push out another major update roll-up for its latest OS this year, much like it did with the oddly named Windows 8.1 Update in April, …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Coat

    And meanwhile in Munich…

    They run "Windows? Nein!"

    1. Trevor_Pott Gold badge

      Re: And meanwhile in Munich…

      Microsoft is the world's premier supplier of Contempt as a Service. Their offerings are unmatched, whether you reside in Germany, the United States, China, or anywhere in between. Subscribe today!

      1. SVV Silver badge

        Oh come on, don't be too hard on them

        After all, as a gazillion dollar company with thousands of the finest IT professionals on our dear planet, it's only going to take them another year to retrofit the Start menu into their operating system.

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Oh come on, don't be too hard on them

          You mean, their equivalent of `git revert` takes that long?

          1. This post has been deleted by its author

    2. The Vociferous Time Waster

      Re: And meanwhile in Munich…

      Nine? That many?

      1. This post has been deleted by its author

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: And meanwhile in Munich…

      "And meanwhile in Munich…

      They run "Windows? Nein!""

      Actually yes they still do for various specific things. Even after ten years of migrations they still have to support 2 environments!

    4. mmeier

      Re: And meanwhile in Munich…

      Actually they DO run Windows. Tons of Citrix clients, WINE and other crutches because a sizeable amount of the needed software does not run under Linux.

      There is a reason they have double the permanent IT staff of compareable german cities

      1. Chemist

        Re: And meanwhile in Munich…

        "WINE and other crutches"

        As you well know, WINE can be required because many software companies can't be bothered to produce Linux versions.

        Strange that Firefox, Thunderbird, Opera, GoogleEarth, Chrome, Skype, Open/Libre Office and others seem to be able to manage that.

        1. mmeier

          Re: And meanwhile in Munich…

          We are not talking "mass market" software here but specialist packages for city jobs. Those have a small licence base and are programmed based on customer request and profiles. If 99 cities say "Windows" and one says "Linux" the latter has to pay for each and every change it needs. And if the software needs certifications/checks - you pay fully for those as well unlike the other 99 who "share" the costs at least partially.

          And that assumes the software is written in a language that runs on Linux. Let's face it, if my main customer base is "Windows" there is no reason NOT to use the latest versions of C# and .NET (and no, Mono is NOT a substitute since they are n, n > 1, versions behind). I did some work for power companies and they demanded "native Windows software". Well, I programm what is payed and since Windows software is payed well, I do that.

          And all that is before we add the "financed by others" (OO) element and the "let's hook the trade goods so we can rip of their data" (Chrome, G-Stuff) elements.

          1. Chemist

            Re: And meanwhile in Munich…

            "We are not talking "mass market" software here"

            I've had plenty of experience in specialist scientific software packages with a VERY limited user base. Companies still managed, in many case to produce Linux/Mac/Windows versions although often Linux/Mac versions were only available as Windows wasn't deemed stable enough - this is Win2000 time.

            "if my main customer base is "Windows" there is no reason NOT to use the latest versions of C# and .NET"

            Then Windows is not your MAIN customer base its your ONLY customer base and by definition you are biased.

            As for the nonsense that is your last paragraph

            -

            1. mmeier

              Re: And meanwhile in Munich…

              Yawn. Those companies did offer that software because - CUSTOMER DEMAND! No companie that want's to stay in business and earns it's money through software would do stuff "because somewhere in the 1.4 percent user base one might be interested".

              I am not doing .NET as my main job, 80+ percent in the last 10+ years where JAVA, quite a bit J2EE. But if a customer is paying - I can do C# as well. Or PHP. Heck, I even do Fortran if I am payed. Mercenary all the way.

        2. TheVogon Silver badge

          Re: And meanwhile in Munich…

          "because many software companies can't be bothered to produce Linux versions."

          You mean because there is no demand / market and people tend to expect everything for free on an Open Source platform.

          1. Chemist

            Re: And meanwhile in Munich…

            "You mean because there is no demand / market"

            There's not likely to be a market if people can't be ar*ed to produce the goods. (Google "Chicken & egg" - you seem to have sufficient expertise with computers ). Plenty of commercial software for Android BTW.

            The scientific software I was referring to below (closed source for Linux) was VERY, VERY expensive but did the job - no problem spending the money. If some commercial software was actually significantly better than the free and/or open-source alternatives I'd have no problems spending on that. As it is I just donate.

            Getting back to Munich, they have it on record that one of the main drivers to go open-source was to have control of their future, saving money was a bonus.They just didn't want to be locked-in to Microsoft's vision of the world. Can't blame them for that. As for mmeier's comment about their spend on support - well, if true, they can certainly afford it with all that they are saving

            1. mmeier

              Re: And meanwhile in Munich…

              We are talking

              FULL time staff in germany! Where the taxes/healthcare etc. can easily be as high as the money you pay out to your employee.

              Still having to pay for Windows/MS Office/Citrix because they can not get rid of it

              Maintaining their own distribution

              They are definitly NOT saving money. What little they saved on licences (and no 1000+ units customer pays list price) they more than spend on personal.

              ==================

              As for chicken&egg: WHY should a company spend considerable manpower on writing software that no one asks for. We are NOT talking MS or SAP here, more the 50-500 employees range of software houses that offer "general base package + tailoring". So as said before:

              IF München wants a Linux version, than München has to order it and pay for it as well as for the additonal maintenance requirements. I am sure if the money is right the companies will take the job. Granted, it WILL cost a lot more than the MS Licences for Office up to Office 2033 and therefor may NOT fit in the LiMux plans.

              And if München wants that software to be general available - put that in the contract. The software houses LOVE that. One customer to pay for dev and every "extra" however (un)likely is a bonus

              1. Chemist

                Re: And meanwhile in Munich…

                "IF München wants a Linux version, than München has to order it and pay for it "

                I think they've done that and are happy with it The only unhappy people seem to be Microsoft and their sycophants

                1. mmeier

                  Re: And meanwhile in Munich…

                  No they have not. Otherwise they wouldn't need all those Citrix systems, Windows servers and WINE crutches. Ordering a Linux version of the software packages would have been very costly and LiMux preferred to hide most of the extra costs in ther personal budget instead of showing them in the software budget.

                  Other cities like Freiburg where smarter and checked the software costs BEFORE the migration. After the costs where tallied - they went with the solution that was cheaper.

  2. Hargrove

    When third parties have the ability to change program code on a weekly basis effective configuration management and testing become impossible. Security patches (many of which I'm convinced would not be required if sound software design practices were followed) are arguably necessary. Extending the scope of the changes to include updates to the Applications is going to produce chaos.

    It was bad enough having to try to figure out where MS had hidden the start/shut down button when they moved from W7 to W8. The demand for novelty and constant change has one inescapable effect. If an existing function is optimal, change can only degrade it. I can just imagine the fun of trying to figure out where they have hidden different functions on a week to week basis.

    Whatever happened to "do it right the first time" and "If it ain't broke, don't fix it?"

    1. This post has been deleted by a moderator

      1. James O'Shea

        "PS if anyone here knows Sinofsky, tell him he's a cunt."

        Oy! None of that, young-feller-me-lad. Cunts are useful,

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          "PS if anyone here knows Sinofsky, tell him he's a c*nt." Oy! None of that, young-feller-me-lad. C*nts are useful,

          Lol, you're right. I shouldn't have lowered the tone.

          I just have a lot of suppressed rage against the idiot that made making a living from windows software that bit harder.

    2. Phil W

      "effective configuration management and testing become impossible."

      Are you talking in a personal and/or small business context? Then maybe, but only if you have your update settings set to automatically download and install all updates.

      In an enterprise environment proper change management of software updates and testing can easily be managed. Turn off automatic updates in Windows and all your other software and deploy all your updates and patches with either a simple WSUS set up for purely MS updates or with even greater granularity and support for deploying other application updates using SCCM.

      You can't complain about Microsoft's update release strategy causing chaos if you don't use the available tools to manage it. Default automatic installation of all updates is only really a suitable approach for individual and small group users who don't care about managing their environment and experience.

      Don't want to check what each update does before installing? Just stick to only installing security updates, which can easily be done, as these rarely have any impact on UI/UX.

      1. Will Godfrey Silver badge

        Do you honestly believe that Joe Sixpack would understand a single sentence of that? There is where this will be a huge problem.

        1. chivo243 Silver badge
          Pint

          @Will Godfrey

          Have an up vote, but remember some admins out there could give two flying fucks about home/non-enterprise users.

          I know it's only Wednesday, but have a pint too!

          1. Phil W

            It's not that I don't care about home users, on the contrary. It's just that I haven't yet met a home user who was excessively baffled or inconvenienced by any cosmetic or functional updates delivered to them either automatically or through them clicking to accept them.

            I frequently support a number of largely computer illiterate friends and family who mostly managed to use Windows 8 (moving from Windows 7) with no great problems, just some minor grumbles about it being different, they were perfectly happy with it within a month.

            Moving from 8 to 8.1, caused them even less grief, they barely noticed the Start button had been added, but they did start using it. Similarly with 8.1 Update 1, they noticed no difference and it caused them no problems.

            For the type of person incapable or uninterested in managing and monitoring their updates at home, installing them all automatically will generally not cause them any problem, but may well offer them some performance or security benefits.

            For non-home users their are a variety of tools and methodologies available for managing updates.

      2. xenny

        I suspect that the next step from this will be to remove the separation between feature updates and security updates. That will make development easier, and going forward, MS' internally perceived competition is rather more nimble than they are.

        If they don't do this, testing a growing complexity of interaction between different levels of installation of security updates and UI/feature updates will become a huge problem. Look at the way they're dropping support for 8.1 pre update 1 - they're trying to manage the variety of system configurations they need to test against.

        1. Phil W

          "I suspect that the next step from this will be to remove the separation between feature updates and security updates"

          Won't happen, simply because of the rage it would cause from Microsoft's large corporate cash cow customers, many of whom will only ever install security updates.

          At worst they may remove the separation between them in the Home efitions of Windows, but I don't see it happening in Professional and Enterprise or Server editions.

          1. xenny

            "Won't happen, simply because of the rage it would cause from Microsoft's large corporate cash cow customers, many of whom will only ever install security updates."

            How would you describe the new IE patch/release/support policy then? There's Enterprise mode as a mitigation, but I suspect it won't be 100% - even the MS web site describing it says " designed to emulate Internet Explorer 8,"

      3. Phil_Evans

        That's a pack of codswallop. Even with the 'smartest' tools like MS SCCM, System Center Service Manager and all the other collateral that Microsoft throw at us in the name of 'configuration management', most folks wouldn't have a scooby how an impacts their environment. WSUS gives you the right to 'choose' what to update if you have an on-site instance and Service Manager and SCCM are dumb to the updates apart from their file extension and any wrapper that goes around them.

        And 'choosing' means 'deciding not to' in some cases for an update. Great! you know that you don't know what you're missing.

        I love Linux (which makes me a rabid, jihadist monk who talks in binary and awk) which comes in major builds (and stable LTS versions) which means every time I run a big update, it's all taken care of. Oh and I can have whatever interface I choose. Including Unity, which makes Metro look like a Fisher Price toy.

        meh.

        1. MyffyW Silver badge

          Linux Update

          @Phil_Evans agree with 99% of what you're saying. The only thing that routinely breaks for me with those Linux updates is Flash. But I gave up expecting an easy life from flash a very long time ago.

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      "When third parties have the ability to change program code on a weekly basis effective configuration management and testing become impossible."

      Linux seems to cope OK - but yes configuration management, update release coordination and testing do rather suck with many distros compared to Windows.

      "Whatever happened to .... "If it ain't broke, don't fix it?"

      People got an education? There is no such word as "ain't" and you mean 'broken'

    4. Robert Helpmann?? Silver badge
      Childcatcher

      Security patches ... are arguably necessary. Extending the scope of the changes to include updates to the Applications is going to produce chaos.

      Not applications, the UI is where the problem is. Applications can have security issues too or have additional functionality added without causing much in the way of distress, but if the entire menu system is rearranged (e.g. drop-downs for ribbon) there might be a bit of trouble. Decouple functionality from cosmetics and things will get a lot better for all.

  3. janimal

    How long until a functional update

    ...bricks millions of machines?

    I betting within 6 months.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: How long until a functional update

      Have a word with Paddy Power or Ladbrokes - I'm sure they'll be happy to help you put your money where you mouth is.

      1. Captain DaFt

        Re: How long until a functional update

        I'd take a piece of that, and say within 3 months.

        And secondly, how loud will J. Q. Public howl when his computer starts changing random functions every month?

        (Watch India's employment soar as tech calls from the masses go through the roof!)

        1. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: How long until a functional update

          (Watch India's employment soar as tech calls from the masses go through the roof!)

          You expected the new CEO to not look after his pal's back home?

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: How long until a functional update

      "How long until a functional update

      ...bricks millions of machines?

      I betting within 6 months."

      Linux seems to manage OK with a far less organised and more chaotic update system in many cases. Seeing as Microsoft patches get fully integration and regression tested unlike many Linux updates, they shouldnt be any worse...

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: How long until a functional update

        "Linux seems to manage OK with a far less organised and more chaotic update system in many cases. Seeing as Microsoft patches get fully integration and regression tested unlike many Linux updates, they shouldnt be any worse..."

        Please stop commenting on Linux until you actually have some real experience to back up your claims, because they certainly don't line up with my own experience.

  4. Bob Vistakin
    Facepalm

    Microsoft: The comedy gift

    That just keeps on giving.

    1. jglathe

      Re: Microsoft: The comedy gift

      More like a cattle prod with a really large battery. Set to nuisance.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Microsoft: The comedy gift

        nada .. la

  5. cosymart
    Megaphone

    Broke

    @Hargrove - 'Whatever happened to "do it right the first time" and "If it ain't broke, don't fix it?"'

    "do it right first time"!!! You mean you have never used any Microsoft software, or to be honest any software of any substance. If software suppliers produced cars it would look like a CV2 and arrive with no wheels, you would never be able to trade it in as you don't actually own it.

    It is broke and they are struggling to fix it :-( The only issue as I see it is that Microsoft's definition of broke is somewhat different to yours and mine.

    1. Jan 0

      Re: Broke

      > "do it right first time"!!! You mean you have never used any Microsoft software, or to be honest any software of any substance.

      Some of us remember Veritas software. That was an excellent example that showed it was possible to produce rock solid software. The trouble is that marketing wins over engineering, e.g Oracle vs. Ingres, Shimano vs. Campagnolo, Bose versus Gale. Marketing people don't believe that a design can ever be optimal.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Broke

        You mean Veritas that produced NetBackup? The most useless and unreliable backup software ever written.

        I don't think you could have chosen a worse example of rock solid software.

        1. Jan 0

          Re: Broke

          Yes I do mean that Veritas, the one bought by Symantec a decade ago. 'nuff said?

          Thankfully, the core of NetBackup is still rock solid, but I was thinking more about the Veritas Filesystem and Volume Manager as shining examples of the way code should be written.

        2. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: Broke

          hang on a minute I'm not having that EMC Networker holds that title!

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Broke

      "It is broke and they are struggling to fix it :-( The only issue as I see it is that Microsoft's definition of broke is somewhat different to yours and mine."

      My definition (and the dictionary's) of 'broke' as an adjective is out of of money. You must have had a sadly lacking education as you obviously meant 'broken'...

  6. John Brown (no body) Silver badge
    WTF?

    "allow you to leave your touchpad active even when a mouse is connected"

    You what? I never even considered that that might be a problem needing an update.

    My laptops, going back to an old but venerable Tosh SatPro PIII to a current SatPro, via a couple of Dells, has always allowed use of the touchpad and mouse at the same time. Of course, they were all running one version or another of Xubuntu.

    On the other hand, I've certainly used WinXP and later with two mice plugged in and/or two keyboards on a desktop PC, either or both of which can be used.

    Am I missing something about this update? Are MS talking about two independantly controlled pointers on screen?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: "allow you to leave your touchpad active even when a mouse is connected"

      Are MS talking about two independantly controlled pointers on screen?

      I can't see any possibility of that causing confusion.

    2. Gordon 11

      Re: "allow you to leave your touchpad active even when a mouse is connected"

      You what? I never even considered that that might be a problem needing an update.

      Neither did I, so I've just booted my laptop into Win8.1U1 (not something I do all that often - I mainly do it to ensure it gets the monthly updates...) to see that I already have a checkable option to "disable internal pointing device when external USB pointing device is attached".

      I also have the ability to "select whether right-clicks are allowed on the touchpad, and enable dragging by double-tapping." (although since I hate tapping - far to easy to do it accidentally - I turn it off.

      So Microsoft is going to give me an update to enable something that is already possible. Don't they actually know what their OS can do?

      Or is it that this is currently done by the Synaptics driver, rather than Windows? In which case I predict I'm going to have fun sorting out the resulting dog-fight with conflicting options in different parts of configurations menus (nothing unusual there for Windows).

  7. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Path everyday

    Microsoft has announced that you will need to reboot every day because you're running nightly builds in production .

  8. Ian Emery Silver badge
    Black Helicopters

    If I am reading this correctly......

    the author is suggesting that Win9 will probably be Win8.1 SP1.

    In which case I might be sticking with XP for longer than I expected!!!!

    (Still updating nicely since adding the "POS" entry to the registry)

    (I always assumed "POS" stood for "Piece of sh.....................................................

    CONNECTION TERMINATED

  9. Someone Else Silver badge
    FAIL

    If ever there was a reason to just shut off Windows update...

    ...this is it.

    Let us review, shall we? Now no longer can we expect the updates to simply fix critical problems, now they will also cram more of Microsoft's "View of the World" (more accurately, an ADHD-addled Millennial marketdroid with self-esteem issues's dystopia) down our collective throats.

    Consider this: Basically, nobody likes the stuff coming out of the Microsoft pipe recently, which probably really pissed off said marketdroids and their collective handlers. So they figured out a way to bundle the crap nobody wants with the other crap everybody thinks they need, and made it an all-or-nothing proposition. I don't know about you, but I know how I'm voting on that proposition.

  10. Dan 55 Silver badge
    FAIL

    So service packs are dead

    So near to Windows 8's EOL (it can't come soon enough) someone with a new system will need to update to 8.1, then 8.1 Update 1, then download about 900 patches, sorry, updates followed by Classic Shell.

    No problem for enterprise though, it's another reason just to stick with Windows 7... forever.

    What's going on inside MS? Does anyone know? Do they know?

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: So service packs are dead

      "No problem for enterprise though, it's another reason just to stick with Windows 7... forever."

      Any enterprise that goes with Windows at the next refresh is totally moronic. I can't think of one reason for that. Even the Exchange/Outlook pig is ready for culling.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: So service packs are dead

        We've got a business critical windows only (ties to DirectX, touches the hardware and has millisecond level timing requirements (which are already an issue with the new sound subsystem in Vista, 7 and 8) app which doesn't work properly in VMware.

        We are due to do a new deployment around Christmas, of machines which typically have 1-2 TB of user data on them and have an expected lifespan of 5+ years. The logistics of reimaging those machines midlife to prevent them having 7 on them past the end of support doesn't appeal. Neither does deploying them with 8.1.

        Deep joy.

      2. SundogUK

        Re: So service packs are dead

        You really don't live in the same world as everyone else do you?

  11. gerdesj Silver badge

    As it turns out

    "Any enterprise that goes with Windows at the next refresh is totally moronic. I can't think of one reason for that. Even the Exchange/Outlook pig is ready for culling."

    I've just found my first customer who don't do the Windows thing wholesale. They seem quite happy running Linux on everything - quite refreshing really. Things aren't perfect - as you'd expect - but the flaws are simple admin things and not OS related.

    They aren't anti commercial stuff, they just don't like MS's offerings. I've just P2V'd their systems into VMware with a dose of Veeam sprinkled in.

    This is in the north of Somerset (county) which, for the benefit of our ex-colonial friends, is a pretty rural part of the UK.

    Cheers

    Jon

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: As it turns out

      > "Things aren't perfect"

      When I recently made the switch, things where a lot better than people (Windows fans) said.

      I've stopped complaining about Windows 8.x, I no longer have to worry about how Microsoft's next brain-fart will screw things up. So a few Word documents aren't pixel perfect - who cares? I now have my computers back! I thought I'd miss Visual Studio - but they're destroying it, and it's only good for Microsoft tech, not the web.

      What I'm trying to say is, it feels such a relief to no longer depend on Microsoft.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: As it turns out

        What I'm trying to say is, it feels such a relief to no longer depend on Microsoft.

        I emigrated from the Microsoft world across to the world of Open Source some years back… initially I just spent holidays there, but in 2001 I packed my bags and moved there permanently.

        I'm in a much happier place. A place where I can give as well as take. A place where I'm in charge of my own destiny.

        Of course, I do sometimes travel back to the Microsoft world, but in most cases those are work-related business trips.

    2. This post has been deleted by its author

  12. Suburban Inmate

    Please don't bollocks it up.

    That is all.

  13. Fibbles

    Microsoft switches their OS to a rolling release...

    ... everyone who has never stepped foot outside of the Windows ecosystem loses their minds.

    1. sabroni Silver badge
      Headmaster

      Re: stepped foot

      it's "set foot" or "stepped.

      1. Fibbles

        Re: stepped foot

        Stepped foot is perfectly cromulent, even if it's not common usage. As is tread foot.

  14. Mystic Megabyte Silver badge
    Linux

    Just say no

    This company upgraded.....to Ubuntu!

    http://www.linuxnewshere.com.au/index.php/linux/bukwang-pharmaceuticals-cut-it-costs-created-business-value-with-ubuntu

    I like the last sentence:

    As Sang-Hoon Kim, President and CEO of Bukwang Pharmaceutical, explained: “At first, we just wanted to save money. But we never expected the free publicity that would result, nor did we expect to launch a profitable new business. For all our success so far, however, it still feels like we are at the beginning of our open source journey.”

  15. alwarming
    Paris Hilton

    You will never guess what she did ..!!!! :0 :o

    Thanks for the homage to the unsung clickbait writers with this faux-click-baity headline.

    Paris, coz you probably know what she did, but don't care.

    1. This post has been deleted by its author

    2. alwarming

      Re: You will never guess what she did ..!!!! :0 :o

      Umm.. I was referring to this sub heading in the article.

      "You'll never believe what it's called inst... actually, you probably can"

      (I suppose my joke wasn't very funny, but still not sure what inflammed the downvoters....)

  16. HKmk23

    So Tuesday's will now be known as.........

    Screw up Tuesday. No... I do not use W8 but MS's "W7 updates" forced me to image my pc every day so when the "updates" were installed I could repair the damage quickly and easily.

    Yes, I know I can choose to download or install or not, but until they are installed you do not know if they are harmless or not.........

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: So Tuesday's will now be known as.........

      ermmm why don't you just have a few test configurations running as VM's. You test your updates on these first and if they work then deploy them to your production. We NEVER deploy updates as soon as they're released either we always wait a week or so you tend to hear of any updates that might cause a major issue.

      And there is no need to image your PC either as Win7 will take a system restore image before the update is applied, so if the PC gets fecked up boot up in to recovery and restore to the last system restore.

  17. Tachikoma

    and the June update to OneDrive to improve your control of sync

    Ah yes, I remember that well, because OneDrive insists on bloody restarting and locking up the machine on every single boot...

  18. Anon123212321

    "Second, a new set of APIs will allow Windows devices to act as Miracast receivers."

    Finally, I'll no longer need to use Teamviewer to use my laptop as an extra monitor, should be able to use Intel's WiDi.

  19. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Can't provide a Start menu for Windows 8

    If they did, they would have no unique selling point for Windows 9.

  20. Avatar of They

    FFS

    Just when you think light is indeed at a tunnel somewhere being shined, they say 2015.

    My knowledge of windows 8 is limited to a three day trial and argument over licencing with MS. (As and upgrade licence that formats your hard drive by accident because the installer is written by a bunch of retards invalidates your licence and you need to buy a full licence.)

    However recently I have had a spate of relatives and friends with crippling viruses, the like of which I can only remove with a fresh install as AV won't touch it and they are hijacking browsers and rewrite the host file with 127. entries.

    But all problems in fixing it stem from the very poor design in how the system sets itself up. And how you navigate between areas.

    If it wasn't for Google and Safe mode (And my bought CD of windows 8) There would be a few more Windows 7 licences in use and less Windows 8.

  21. GitMeMyShootinIrons

    I don't think you'll see Windows 9.

    And not for the reason that most MS haters would wish for. I can seriously imagine a time not so far away when MS drop the number from the name and end up just calling it Windows. After all, nearly all of the current references to Office now refer to Office 365 rather than Office 2014 - it wouldn't be a leap to imagine Windows going in a similar direction and by moving to an incremental update model for features as well as updates is a sign of things to come.

    I wonder if Windows itself will move to an Office365 style subscription model too? Now that's a controversial idea...

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: I don't think you'll see Windows 9.

      Considering Nadella's cloudy background, I think Windows will move to a 'software as a subscription' model sooner rather than later. In fact, you can deduce this from Window 8's annoying habit of nagging you to sign in with your Microsoft account.

      Fortunately, for my fellow Microsoft-hating comrades, this will most definitely spell the ultimate end of Microsoft as we know it. If there's anything we detest, it is an operating system that we have to cough out money every month for and one that demands you to be online all the time. If Microsoft hadn't yet learnt from the Xbox One debacle, it is daft.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: I don't think you'll see Windows 9.

        "I think Windows will move to a 'software as a subscription' model sooner rather than later."

        It's already available from Microsoft. You can rent Microsoft software - over say 1, 2 or 3 years.

    2. Archaon
      Trollface

      Re: I don't think you'll see Windows 9.

      "After all, nearly all of the current references to Office now refer to Office 365 rather than Office 2014"

      That would be because the current version is Office 2013.

      1. GitMeMyShootinIrons

        Re: I don't think you'll see Windows 9.

        @archaon - typo on my part :-)

        Office 365 isn't the 365th release either. My point still stands.

  22. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Typical Microsoft

    This is a marketing decision. Microsoft knows Windows 8 is buggered, no point flogging a dead horse, so might as well entice users to fork out money for the next version of Windows.

    This was more or less the same reason why Windows 7 stopped at Service Pack 1.

    1. Mage Silver badge

      Re: Typical Microsoft

      and why SP7 was cancelled for NT4. I ran and tested preview NT4 USB stack that would have been in SP7. Win2K drivers / applications worked on it.

      Or why no SP4 for XP.

      They don't like SP since they moved to online updates. I'm amazed there were ANY SPs for any windows after XP SP3

      Lots of people still don't have Broadband. They need SP CDs.

  23. OGShakes

    Another MS story, lets shout mindlessly until satisfied!

    Why does everyone get so upset when Microsoft say they are doing anything? Microsoft could release windows for free and everyone would still complain.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Another MS story, lets shout mindlessly until satisfied!

      Because they don't do anything good.

  24. Malagabay
    Paris Hilton

    "release windows for free and everyone would still complain"

    For many "free" isn't cheap enough when it comes to the Great Eight and Ridiculous Ribbons...

    Perhaps they will move to "Suffering As A Service"....

    Where they pay people to "suffer in silence" each month...

    Would still only be attractive to masochists...

    But then there are a lot off them about [in the corporate environment]...

    CHORUS [you know you really want to join in]

    The Deadwood Redmond stage is coming on over the hill...

    Whip crack away, whip crack away, whip crack away

    Doesn't that feel better???

  25. Daniel von Asmuth Bronze badge
    Windows

    Let's not dwell on the negative

    In Redmond county, you thank Gates on your bare knees for any update that fixes bugs, but you curse his name for any update that brings new bugs^H^H^H^Hfeatures.

  26. Graham Triggs

    OneDrive

    Oh, there was an update to OneDrive in June? That might explain why recently it has been consistently crashing on startup.

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